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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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January 10, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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January 10, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62o-o4o A rime lhbliatin Millsrd B. Grime& MIKE HAl Pu BLISHERIADXT.RI ING DR JOHN KtrVKENagALL AS..)C.TE PUBLISHER]EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSLSTA.rr EDrrOR JAYNE GOLtl6"IDN BusL' MANAGER e Phone (706) 846-3188- Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 HogansviUe, Georgia 30230 Snow No Fun When Working Did you enjoy the snow that blanketed the area last week? I didn't enjoy it that much because I worked right through it. That's the thing about working at the newspa- per, it has to be printed and delivered no matter what. So, when bad wea comes.., we just work right through it. The kids sure enjoyed it though. There were lots of snowmen and (being politi- cally correct) snow women throughout the area. I even noticed a couple of children had build igloos in the snow. Funny thing about snow is that it makes all of us feel like a kid again. Even if we don't like the mess, the cold and all the other things that go with it, we all love to look at it and (if we tell the truth) like playing in it. Since we don't get snow here that much, we some- times really don't remember how beautiful it is. Looking out the window was a treat because of the beauty the snow left behind. Uqfortunael, with the beau  :lndS the ba things, we spend a lot more money heating our homes, there are always lots of acci- dents on the highways and insurance rates usually increase because of the claims, etc. So while the snow is beautiful, it's also a little frustrating and costly. I had a lot of fun though for the two days that snow covered the ground. We had a number of employees that were unable to make it to work and I answered the phones for two days, what a hilarious couple of days. ON WEDNESDAY, the day of the first snow, a gen- tleman called in and wanted to talk to someone in accounts receivable. I told him we did not have any in that depart- ment because of the inclement weather and he began to laugh at me I won- dered just what he thQught was so funny, so I asked, "Well," came the vhice from the other end, "rmin New York. I don't think the weather there could be half as bad as here." I had to chuckle myself to think about it. I mean New York- is buried in snow and ice. On Thursday, a gentle- men called and vbanted to know when his subscription would expire. Again, I explained that there was no one in that department due to the weather. Again, a chuckle. I couldn't resist, I had to ask. "Ohio," he said. "We're used to snow up here. Guess it kind of puts a halt to things in the south. I was gonna call the Rome newspaper next, but they probably are not working either." Well, we're just not used to snow here in the south. I mean, when it snows we think we should get a vacation from work. It's dangerous driving up and down the roads. I wouldn't expect someone from the north to understand that. Snow is a every day occurance for them. WHILE THIS wasn't one of the biggest snow storms I've seen here is Georgia, it was a one. r ber was in 1973. The reason I remember it so vividly was because of the time it hit and where I was. I had just turned 16and got- ten my driver's license. I had a dentist appointment in Columbus and my mother had volunteered to take me. However, being 16 with a new driver's license, there was no way that was going to happen. So, I checked out of Harris County High School in Hamilton about 12 noon and drove to the dentist in Columbus. While I was at the dentist, a snow storm hit and it dumped a lot of sleet pret- ty quickly. The roads froze over very fast and then the snow began to fall. Before I left the dentist Office, the roads were covered. I drove all the way home to Shiloh from Columbus in that snow. Luckily, I was driv- ing a straight shift and man- aged to make it. It didn't take me long to learn to drive in the snow. I just had to remem- ber not to touch my brakes. So, it was easy for me to drive to work during our recent snow, even though I don't own a four-wheel drive. All I had to remember was to shift down to stop and not used the brakes. ThaCs the trick to driving on snow and ice, never touch your brakes. I'm thankful for that experience as a young man. It's proven to be valauable. THE HOGANSVlI.LE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercu, Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Medwether Counties: $26 a year el,where, Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical ixvtage paid at HogansviUe, Georgia 30230. FOR StmSCRn call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASaXR: Send addre changes to E O. Box 426, Hogzalsville. GA 30230. SAfv Publisr and Advtising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher arm Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Busi Manager ........................................................................ Javne Goldston Assistant Editor: ..................................................................................... Rob Richar&on StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Mager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ...................................................................................... :.Linda Lester Composing ........................................................................ Valinda lvery, Lauren King Legals ......................................................... : ............................................ Jayne Goldston Pressman ................. : ........................................................................ Wayne Cmhowski Pressroom .......................................................................... David Boggs, Larry Colleges ConrtmAT President. ............................................................................................ Millard B. Grirn Vice Presidenu ......................................................... .. ..................... Charlte S. Grimes Secretary .......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garreu Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JAN. 10, 2002 "1 Life In tieorgla Involves Risks (Written in 1991) A recent study of the life spans of men and women showed that Georgia is near the bottom in a ranking of states. Hawaii and Minnesota were the states where people live the longest. Hawaii, of course, fea- tures a warm tropical climate where people sit around drinking various exotic con- coctions made with pineap- ple juice and watch lovely young girls in grass skirts move their sensuous bodies to ukulele music. The only drawback to liv- ing a long time in Hawaii is you get very old and your eye- sight eventually goes, but you still have to put up with all the ukulele music. As to Minnesota, nobody really lives a long time there. It's so cold it just seems like it. Being a Georgian, I natu- rally was concerned upon dis- covering I can't expect to live as long as people from other states. Georgia is a marvelously diverse state, with mountains and seashores and charming small towns and, of course, bustling, exciting Atlanta. So what makes us die ear- lier than other Americans? I put some thought to this ques- tion and came up with the fol- lowing: ATLANTA TRAFFIC: Other cities have traffic jams; Atlanta has traffic wars. General Sherman burned this city. The highway department is dismantling it piece by piece. There is so much highway construction in Atlanta, motorists have to wear hard hats. Rather than face anoth- er day in Atlanta traffic, a lot of people simply die to avoid it. GNATS: Gnats, tiny bugs, are the cause of a number of deaths in south Georgia each year. Some of these deaths have been attributed to swal- lowing a large number of gnats while talking or eating. Some also think the rea- son a lot of south Georgians disappear and never are heard from again is they are carried off by giant swarms of gnats and drowned in the Okefenokee Swamp. KUDZU: Nothing grows faster than a kudzu vine. It has been known to cover entire homes in Georgia while the families are asleep for the night. They are then trapped inside and can't get to a convenience store so they starve. Those who try to eat their way out of kudzu quickly have their innards entangled in the vine, because no matter how much you chew it the blamed stuff just keeps on growing. THE FALCONS: The Falcons lost a game to the Chicago Bears, 36-0, and the Falcons' coach blamed it on poor officiating. The Falcons have been big losers most every year they've been in Atlanta. A man fell out of the stadium during a Falcons game once and was killed. I think he jumped after anoth- er Falcons holding penalty. LIVING IN BUCK- HEAD: Buckhead is a tiny section of Atlanta, similar to those in other large metro- politan areas, where about 11 million people under the age of 35 live. Each evening all II mil- lion get into their Mercedeses and go to trendy Buckhead bars and talk to one another. Here is what a Buckhead bar conversation usually sounds like: "I was like, 'Wow!' and he was like, 'Really?" Dory Hoga eepti( eDoll These people might die Mr 1 from .... wearing their designeiof--"1 jeans too tlght, choking o . qdthe hearts of palm while eatmgrvic e their salads or being tram o h" fy pied by a polo pony s e m] The study furthe Sur revealed at what time of y . ealtt most Georgians die. It's wheq of the legislature is in session. !mess ghte BY SPECIAL Aim00GFff= o MENT wrrH HIS WlDOV00ada DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS I00lsisu CARRYING SEI2ECqI]d ten COLUMNS BY THE LATE IEWI GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NEARBY MORELAND, ANII I BECAME THE MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA WRITER O[ I-HS TIME. GRIZZARI rs. BEINGED TO AI AMERIC.-I nFat BUT HE PARTICULARL 8 "ax B00NGED TO TInS AREA R GEORGIA, OF WHICH H]f/i C t WROTE SO OFTEN, ANn B WHERE A PORTION OF I-8 d )rr tu FROM NEWNAN T R," inl HOGANSVIIJ IS NAMED Ic } HIS HONOR. THE LEWI l a GRIZZARD MUSEUM WAI 9 8 FarABUSHED tN MORELAm00 he IN 1996, AND A WRITING ANI,  EDITING LAB IS BEING DEDI A CAZZDTOmS00O00ATHIS BELOVED UNIVERSITY Oet rs GEORGIA.GRI72ARI)'S BOOle xii AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAI v 'aslU( ABLE FOR SALE THROUGII h t t( BAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS, POkes nox 009100s, ATLANTA, 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK ANItis t MUSIC STORF NATIONWIDbov You Thought I Wasn't Looking... Frances and I have two dear friends who are the par- ents of two grown children. One of the children has been very successful in life, mar- tied with a very nice he and family. The other chad hasn't d6H"s"6 rdl], falling into bad company at a young age, developing some bad habits and never really get- ring control of life. Both children were raised in the same loving Christian home. Both were taught right from wrong, edu- cated (as far as each would go), loved and churched. They both were raised iden- tically, no favorites. Our friends are thankful for both children and love them equally. However, sometimes they (especially the father) beat themselves up worrying about what they might have done, or could have done differently, in the case of the child that has not done so well hi life. Could the y have been better examples? I hardly think so. Even though they were not perfect parents, and none of us are, what they appar- ently fail to see are the many things they did over the years that were good examples for their n compared to the qer-) few things that might not have b/z. SOMEONE wrote the fol- lowing that puts their situa- tion and many other parents as well, in perspective. It is titled, "When you thought I wasn't looking." *I saw you hang my first painting on the refrigerator, and I immediately wanted to paint another one. *I saw you feed a stray cat, and I learned that it was good to be kind to animals. *I saw you bake my favorite cake for me, and I learned that the little things can be the special things in life. *I saw you make a meal and take it to a friend who was sick, and I learned that we all have to help take care of each other. I saw you give of your time and money to help peo- ple who had nothing, and I learned that those who have something should give to those who don"t. *I felt you kiss me good- night, and I felt loved and safe. *I saw you take care of our house and everyone in it, and learned we have to care for what we are given. oI saw how you handled your responsibilities even when you didn feel well, and I learned that I would have to be responsible when I grow up. *I saw tears come from your eyes, and I learned that fGa I laness ndct YOU SEE, our childre and others watch us muct closer than we think, and the L._.._ don't only see the few ba things we might do, they als see the many good things They see the importanl things we do when we thi that no one is watching. A Need to Teach the Word of God00 This past weekend our hearts sank in horror as we heard the report of the fif- teen-year-old young man who stole a single-engine Cessna and proceeded to crash it into a bank building in Tampa, Florida. I do believe that it was only by the grace of God that no one was in that office at the time. In years past, the nation was astounded at the news of teens not only taking firearms to school, but using them to actually murder teachers and classmates. Now, in what appears to be a copycat of the dreadful events of September 11, a teen has used a plane to make his statement. In a song by the Southern Gospel singing family, The Steeles, a line says, 'qktat has happened to our young people?" Indeed, what has happened to some of our young people? I will be the first to stand up for the young people of our nation. In spite of all the 'oad apples" we hear about, there are some fine young people in this country. I have two boys. One is fourteen and one: will be eleven in a few months, and they are two fine young men. Many of you reading this can vouch for the integrity of young people that you know. Even some of the ones "gone bad" need defend- ing. Although they have made mistakes and even commit- ted crimes, some of the responsibility has to be placed at the feet of the par- ents. In many instances we hear of how terrible the pub- lic school system is, how lax the teachers are and how the education received by the children is substandard. Granted, there are some teachers who probably need to be doing something else; there are some schools which need overhauling; and there are standards which need to be raised, but in the end the responsibility for the educa- tion of our children and young people is again to be placed in the lap of the parents. The greatest problem our school systems have (in my opinion) is the home. Our homes are not what they used to be. I do not know anything about the young Bishop boy's (the boy who flew the plane mentioned ear- ller) parents, but I do know many of our teens would be in less trouble if the home was like it ought to be. Our teachers need the support of the parents. I remember growing up, if I got in trouble at school, I was in twice the trouble at home, no questions asked. The teachers need support and our children need support. Ask them about their day, get involved with homework, and know what they are being taught. There are those who leave the secular education to the public school teacher and there are those who leave the spiritual education to the Sunday School teacher. The Bible tells us that children are heritage from the Lord. Being a pmamt carries a great weight of responsibility and just as there are juvenile delinquents, there are also parental delinquents. We as parents have the responsibil- ity to teach our children the Word of God, but our childr also have the need to be taught the Word of God. It "Corn may be that some yo_g peo ple need a change in the things surrounding them, but all our young people need # I change in the things inside .,,,. them. In order to change th /L way our children act on outside they first need changeontheinside that only comes from a sonal relationshi Christ, which can only through the Word of The apostle Paul in ing to young Timothy said 2 Timothy 3:15-17, from a child thou has the hol3 able to make thee wise is in Christ Jesus. All ture is given by of God, andis doctrine, rection, for instruction righteousness: That the be perfect, nished unto all What our children need equip tumble world ahead of around them is a life ed upon the truths of Bible. sometimes things hurt, am it's all right to cry. oi saw how you cared I wanted to become thing that I could be. *I saw how you workect oftentimes tong ,hbrS, , to se that our material nds werd met. oi saw how you tried you/ best to put God first, famil and friends second, and 110 finances third, and I learned from that. *I learned most of life'S lessons that I need to kno . to be a good and productiv*- person when I grow up fron -X,'-J { you. *I looked at you and want. ed to say, "Thanks for all the things I saw when yo thought I wasn't Iooldng."