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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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January 13, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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January 13, 2000
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A Grimes Publication Millard B, erimim, President USPS 620-O4O MInE HALE PUBI,ISI IFPJAI)vEItTISIN(; DIRECI'OR JOHN KUYi;NI)AtJ, L;S( g: INI'I-: PUBI ,ISl IEII )FI' )R ASS X'IATE EI)IT()I JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAt ;ER Phone (7(}6) 846-3188 Fax (7(}6) 846-221}6 E O, Box 426 t togansville, Georgia .)230 'Take Me Home, Country Road' Well now we were just sit- ting around and I thought of something: "Wife, I sez, "Do you remember our young edi- tor of The Hogansville Herald, Bill Lowe (pronounced how), wanted an article on dirt roads?" "Yes," replies the wife, "but do you know diddly about dirt roads?" "Wife," is my witty reply, "I don't know diddly about half I do, but I do have my memo- ries." I do remember the beauti- ful old dirt roads we use to have. Roads would turn and twist, trees would be on the edge. Wild flowers on the banks, and when it rains; mud everywhere. In those days they used men, mules' and scoops and would work for years, it seemed, on just a short stretch of road. You even got to know the mules by name. Now-a- days the great machines move more dirt and rocks in five minutes than you can shake a stick at. We have mentioned before the long mud hole between here and Montgomery. The mud man had to travel through! He must have done real well for right beyond the mud hole was a beautiful colonial home with statues of two mules pulling an Edsel through the mud. Underneath the statue was a sign stating "Mule Power is Beautiful". I loved the old roads. You got to know the people. There was one country store we stopped at often. In the tree shade we would eat our fried chicken and deviled eggs, then we would top it off with moon pies and Nehi Orange. The roads had character, and you knew them. now-a- days they all go straight and look alike. You think you are going north on the "big road" and don't realize you have messed up until you see the sign "Welcome to Florida". The only place you can stop is in the emergency lane, and by that time it may be too.late. But dirt roads did have some disadvantages. For one thing, they were narrow. Say one car met another. Especially if ruts had formed, someone had to give way and go down among the pines. There was sort of a caste system. The poor gave way to the rich, the young gave way to the old, but the women gave way to no one. (This was only after they let women start driving.) You would meet a woman driving a car and both would stop. She would not look at you, but stare in the distance, fix her face, fluff her hair and sometimes do her nails while she waited for you to get out of the ruts and go amongst the pines and mud so she could get by. There is a hang over from this to this very day. Watch women at a stop light. They will fluff, or push up, their hair while they wait. They claim they don't have a handy place to scratch like men do. In 1925 Hogansville was dirt roads. Even our main street was a sea of mud in wet weather. The paving company that build us the nice street we now have went broke in the process, but it's been a long time since anyone has had to back up main street. So many roads to go a-rid- ing with the firls if you had a girl, wheels and 50 cents for gas. How many remember going over thrill hill? Your stomach in your heart! If we had landed sideways we would have rolled from there to eter- nity - but we didn't. When was the last time you parked on observatory hill? The lights of Hogansville wink- ing in the darkness in the dis- tance. What plans were laid, what dreams were made on observatory hill? What was done there in the darkness on what is now Rails Road? Those who were there then are like- ly old and gray now, and they are not about to tell - would you? The road we now live on, Mountville Road, was dirt. I used to come courting out this road to see the girl who is now my wife. This was some 40 years ago, but it was "the" coun- try road. The wife remembers as a small girl walking behind the road scraper and feeling the soft moist clay going between her toes. Try that on 185 sometimes. Many things change, but there are still country roads lined with trees, their leaves falling like a gentle rain in the fail. There are still those who remember the colors of a coun- try road, the smell, the beauty. There are still those whose hearts feel uplifted when they hear the song, "Take Me Home Country Road." Tin: Hi K,,svtt,t,l-; I'IOME NE sis published weekly by the Star- Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Rooseveh Highway, Mmlchetcr, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040, Subription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether. Talbo or Harris Counties: $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage prod at Hogaasvillc, Georgia 30230, FoR st'as(llffrtoNs call (7()6) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. TMANTER: Send address chmges to E O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. SIFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publishox and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall As.iale Editor .................................................................................................. Byan (;ccr Business Manager ........................................................................................ Jayne G()[dton Staff" Writers ........................... Caroline Yeager/J. Dan SIouVLee N. HoelllBilly Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Li:is Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lesler llologr'aphy .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ............................................................................. Valinda Ivery. Deborah Smith Legals ................................................................................................................. Valmda h.ery Receptionist and Classilieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager. ........................................................................................ Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs u Wayne Grochowski Comm vr): ()VVW:R President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grime Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grime Scrlary .............................................................................................. [.aura Grimes C(,ler Tretsurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrctt Legal Counsel and Assistant Scretal T ..................................................... James S. Gnmes OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JANUARY 13, 2000 Georgia Lottery Has Its Pros and Cons When I go into a convenience store to purchase a coke, a loaf of bread, a gallon of milk or even to pay for gasoline, I usually have to wait in a line for other customers to "play their num- bers." It seems nearly everyone is playing the lottery -- young and old, black and white, male and female, rich and poor, especial- ly during the noon hour, when most people are on their lunch break or around 6:30 p.m. when folks are on their way home from a hard days work. It really aggravates me to have to wait in line. Of course I could go across the street to another store, but the grass is no greener over there. I'm not debating whether the lottery is right or wrong. There are many thing s worse than playing the numbers. Each per- son has to decide for himself. Those in favor of the lottery say 'It is my business what I do with my money.' Since this is America -- the land of the free, I agree. Except we have a responsibility to God, to our families and to ourselves. What really bugs me about the "numbers" is when I see a mother or daddy go into a store, spend all their money on lottery tickets and buy nothing for their bare footed and ragged-clothed children, or buy lottery tickets and then take food stamps to purchase the necessities of life. Those against the lottery, say it is gambling. I have to agree. God wants us to depend o n Him more and more. I don't see much difference between the lottery and seniors Editor class at church making a quilt and selling chances on it for a dollar, or the brotherhood hav- ing a turkey shoot and men pay- ing two or three dollars to buy a chance to hit the closest to the x on a target to win a turkey. Another negative to the lot- tery is the litter on the premis- es of the stores. What an eye- sore that can be! Since the lottery is here to stay, I say we use the monies the best possible way. There is no doubt the lottery has helped the school children in Georgia. I think every every school in enough computers. the law-makers to using the funds to schools and throughout the state. This would no cut property taxes for ers throughout the with taxes for everybody. The monies cou uted according to each county spent on I personally voted the lottery and would if it came up for a But since it is here the dollars are used best for everybody. Was Pine Mountain Experiment a The year after Roosevelt attended the pageant at Pine Mountain Valley, Harry Hopkins transferred the three rural communities over to the Farm Security Agency. Colonists were allowed to buy homes with federal loans. The next year Gay Shepperson left. Defense production and the growth of economic opportu- nities around Fort Benning at Columbus created jobs that lured colonists out of the com- munity. In 1943 congress looked into the FSA and concluded that it and the communities were no longer needed. It ordered liquidation. At Pine Mountain Valley, you could buy a nice five-room house with a barn and 30 or 40 acres for $400 down and get a 20- or.3Oear loan on the remainingS2,,000 at 3 percent interest: The result, 30 years later, is a pleas- ant, rural, suburban-type com- munity of homeowners, few of them early colonists The final balance sheet on Pine Mountain Valley showed that in 10 years it cost the fed- eral government $1,400,000 or $7,000 per colonist-family. Straight relief would have been slightly less. Does that mean it was a failure? That depends on what was expect- ed. Roosevelt expected the effort to save money and to bring about a permanent self- sufficient community, neither of which came about. But many lives were improved; hope was kept alive; and it was certainly the sort of gamble worth taking. It could have worked. Roosevelt for all his enthusiasm never doubted that this sort of thing was a gamble. "If a community of [this] kind can be made somewhere around 80% self-sufficient," he told reporters in Warm Springs in November 1934, "it proba- bly can be made a go of. But the point is that, obviously, pri- vate capital won't go into that... Private capital "won't do it because there is too much risk." The government alone was /i /i/ii!!/ ii :i! ii ii ' /" big enough to take such risks. TAP BENNETT stayed to the end, resigning in December 1944. He wanted to stay in Pine Mountain Valley, even then; he bid on the large, handsome manager's home he lived in during his steward- ship. His was the high bid, but it was turned down as too low. Henry Kimbrough, a local politician and long,time friend of Roosevelt, as well as a mem- ber of the Pine Mountain Valley Community board at one time, urged the President and Hopkins to intervene. On January 5, 1945, .Roosevelt. wrote Hopkins, "Do you think there is anything we can do?" Nothing was done. It requires no leap ination to assume t] Roosevelt not been, trying to manage war in history, he wot seen to it that his o1( and servant Bennett he wanted and INFORMATION articles on Pine Valley were drawn following sources: Paul Conkin's Happened in Pine Valley," appeared Georgia Historical March 1963. It is an ei study of the subject Tugwell intervi( Bennett at length in tl and the author For the 7,enera  t sary to understandin other chapters which economic realities in the 1920s and Emergence of the Ne by George Tindall i: good. When Lewis Learned to Drive When I was growing up, "peeling rubber" was referred to as "getting a wheel." For a boy-man driver of an automo- bile, it was sign of weakness if he didn't "get a wheel" at every opportunity to do so. Leaving school was a very important time to get a wheel. Only pissants, science-club members, and other social mis- fits didn't get a wheel when they left school. Most of them also usually were picked up by their mothers and driven home for their piano lessons. Not so, the cool, mature guys. When school was out at Newnan High (class of '64 here), it sounded like the Indy 500 time trials in the student parking lot. I'm convinced the cool, mature types single- handedly kept the Goodyear Tire Company in business between the years of 1960 and 1964, when I was in high school. Getting a wheel involved putting your car in low gear, holding down the clutch, and revving g on the engine for a good two or three minutes to build up the momentum. Then you released the clutch and were doing 65 in a heartbeat. But that was only on your speedometer. Your tires were doing 65 in one place. The result was that about half the tread on the tires your father bought you if you promised never to get a wheel was fly- ing through the air. The result- ing "errrrk" sound they made on the concrete turned every head. Once a car did lurch into forward motion, if you could get a wheel when you chatlged gears a second and third time, it meant you likely would end up on the cover of Time mag- azine as Man of the Year. I RECEIVED MY driver's license at the LaGrange, Georgia, State Patrol head- quarters on Saturday, October 20, 1962, my 16th birthday. The Newnan Georgia State Patrol office was a lot closer to Morelandl six miles, but that post didn't issue driver's licenses on the weekend. Wait until Monday to get my driver's license when I'd been counting the days until this moment since they took the training wheels off my bike? No damn way. My relationship with females began to go downhill the very first night I had my driver's license. I had a date with the woman who would later become my first wife, the lovely Paula, Naturally, our date was to go to the drive-in. I'd cruise by the Dairy Queen, now that I finally had come of age to do such a wondrous thing. THE CRUISING PART went well. Friends saw me behind the wheel of a car, which gave me status and acceptability. But when I start- ed to pull out onto the highway for the drive-in, the trouble began. A couple of my friendsl who were sitting atop the hoods of their cars at the Dairy Queen because every mother in the county wouldn't allow their daughters to date them on account of their reputations as reckless driver, screamed at me, "Hey Lewis, get a wheel!" As much as I had wanted to get my driver's license, I did- n't do a lot of studying or think- ing about automobiles before- hand. I didn't know one thing about carburetors, glass packs, Earl Scheib, painting flames on the side of your car, hanging foam rubber dice over your rearview mirror, or putting your name on the dri- ver's door and your girlfriend's name on the passenger door, which a lot of guys did, as in "Ducky" and "Sylvia." And there was another problem. The automobile that I was driving had no clutch. It had an automatic transmis- sion. It was a 1958 blue-and- white Pontiac. I actually pre- ferred an automatic transmis- sion, because a straight stick involved three foot pedals, instead of two, and a lot more mechanical knowledge and ability than I had at the time. (I'm still suffering from being mechanically impaired, as a matter of fact, manifested by the fact that i usually have to have an attendant come out to show .me how to operate the pump when I pull into a self- serve filling station.) SO THERE I WAS, my moment to shine. To join that great fraternity of wheel-get- ters. To follow in he steps of some of the great wheel-get- ters and reckless drivers like Dudley Stamps and Raiford Smith, famed tire-tread destroyers, both. I stopped before pulling out onto the highway, but I felt a deep panic. I'd never gotten a wheel before. I knew it had something to do with stomp- ing on the accelerator as hard as you could from an idling position. Bit was I supposed to put the gear in "L" first or would "D" suffice? I knew"D" was for "Drive." But what was this "L" thing? I decided, in my panic, "L" probably stood for I pulled it down to,L," the accelerator, an across the street into trash receptacle in West's Body Shop, located across the the Dairy Queen. My first thought were my girlfriend and or had I totaled the Pontiac. It was, did wheel? I was fairly certai n't. One, I hadn't "errrrk." I had heard "huuuuuume!" --the s( '$8 Pontiac makes low gear and s( es the accelerator all to the floor and it lurct from a Dairy Queen an( ly misses a collision duce truck loaded with i greens and sweet crashes into a trash cle at West's Body I then looked rearview mirror to see the reaction had been first attempt to get a They were doubled laughter, some lay hoods on their beat on the hoods fists, howling and I didn't get Out of the i check any damage. I leave that place as quic possible. So I put my "R," backed into the s nearly colliding with Greyhound bus Carrollton, turned it t the drive-in, the movi( Robert Mitchum in Th Road, where Robert Miti played a guy who drove loaded with moonshine mountain roads. The lasted about an hour and At least three quarters ol were taken up by r( Mitchum getting Wl throughout the entire st Tennessee.