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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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January 15, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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January 15, 2004
 

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[ Opinions & Ideas JOHN KVYKENDALL PUBUS~mR/EDrroR LAtrinE IZ'WlS ADW.R~SU~G DIRECTOR Oa~rr OAVaROOK ASSOCIATE EDITOR RoB RiCHARI~ON AS.S~'TANT EDrrOR JAVNE ~N Busn~ss ~[AN AGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O, Box 426 HogansviUe, Georgia 30230 Millard B. Gdmes, PreMdent Do You Remember? I Sure as Heck Don't Then, it hit me, I'm not the only writer who does not remember his own personal columns. Once, while at the daily newspaper, I was able to meet the famed Lewis Grizzard. I told him about one of his columns that I thought was the funniest he had ever writ- ten. With a blank look on his face, he just replied, "Really, I don't remember that par- titular piece of art work." Dink's column mentioned above was an award winner for him in the Georgia Press Association's better newspa- per contest. When speaking with him not too awful long ago, I mentioned the column to him. He did remember the column, but noted he didn't remember it being as funny as it was and had even for- gotten about the puppy and I GUESS the point is that no matter what columnists write about, how famed they become for their works, or how many awards they win, they simply don't remember many of the columns they write or what possessed them to write them in the first place, even though there is usually a point behind each and every column. There have been many weeks since beginning my career in newspapers that I didn't feel like writing a col- umn, some weeks that I sim- ply had writer's block and some that I couldn't wait to write a column, but I've always managed to sit down to the computer and bang one out anyway, even if it was ag "ablst my better judgement. I will say it m~kes me feel good when people tell me they read my column every week and that they actually did learn something from the col- I think, if memory serves me correctly, that it was for- mer Georgia Press Association President Dink NeSmith who wrote a column about spreading his ashes in the ink of the newspaper that printed his obituary. It had to be one of the funniest columns I've ever read and remembered for about 20 or years. The column described how he was going to request- that upon his death, his body be cremated and the ashes spread into the ink. NeSmith went on to write about how he knew, but it was all right with him, that peo- ple would use the newspaper for wrapping fish, training puppies and lining bird cages. You can see why it was funny and well remembered. Over the years, I've writ- ten many personal columns. Some funny, some down right stupid, some controversial, some educational and some not worth the ink and paper it took to print them. But, because I was required to, I managed to write a column every week Even when I was with a daily newspaper, that once per week ~task never ~ alluded me. If you will notice, I referred to my weekly effort as "my personal column." That is because it is the one place in the newspaper that allows me to share my thoughts. When one writes news, that person must keep their personal feelings out of the story. Another reason I call it a personal column is because I write about things that are personal. I think this gives my readers a way to get to know me as an individual. This past week I stopped by the Manchester Woman's Club to snap a photograph of their guest speaker and almost everyone there com- mented on my columns. The comments were pretty much the same.., they appreciated my column because it was about things they could a~so- ciate with. For instance, One lady stated she really enjoyC~d my column about remodeling\, From Lewis Grizzard's collection "Kathy Sue Loudermilk, I Love You" Written in 1978 I was having a conversa- tion with an airline stew- ardess. We were not in an air- plane, however. I avoid trav- eling by airplane. Don't get me wrong. I'm not afraid to fly. It is crashing and burn- ing that bothers me. If God had intended man to fly, He would have never given him the rental car and unlimited mileage. "That's silly," said the stewardess when I told her of my aversion to air travel. "Don't you know that you are safer in an airplane than in an automobile?" ,I've heard that bunk before. Anything that goes five miles into the air at 500 miles per hour and they make you strap yourself inside canX be safe. Automobiles are much safer than airplanes because they :don't go as high nor as fast, and they can be pulled over and parked and aban- doned, if necessary, at a moment's notice. Try pulling an airplane into the emer- nology career advisory com- mittee meeting at Central High School in Talbotton. Frankly, I have never felt more ill equipped on an assignment in my life. I felt as lost as a "Betsy Bug." Very seldom am I ever at a loss for words. I know I read a l~and make every effort bird commenL.~ .......... J~Q ke~c~cer,W~he mpdern world, l~ut I found out I have a way to go. I have never been tech- nologically minded and it sure showed at this meeting. I had the poorest notes from this meeting I can remember. How in the world will I ever inform'our read- ers what's going on in. our technology department if I don't understand myself. Many thanks to Melissa Mitchell, secretary of the local committee, for making her minutes available to me for the newspaper. I realize that all of us have talent of some kind, but very my home. Another comment- '~, unto or could associate with the column. Even ff I don't remember it. As I said earlier, every column should have a mean- ing and this one does, as well. The meaning behind this one is simple. My owner tells me I have to write a column each week and here it is. It's deft- nitely not my best work, but it does put food on the table. Tune in next week, maybe I'll have a real column for you all. ed on a column I had written several weeks prior about my grandson. Funny, I always get a lot of comments when I write about my grandson. ANYWAY,~ to keep (rom boring you to death, as I lis- ; tened to the ladies talk about ; my past columns, it surprised t me that they remembered [ more about the columns that I did. I couldn~ imagine tlmt. TIlE HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the S~r-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchcs|er, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere: Prices include all ~les taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia ~230.Single copy FOR svesc~noNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. POb'TMASTi~: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansviile. GA 30230. Publisher and Editor ........................................................................... John Kukyendall Advertising Director ................................................................................. .Laurie Lewis Associae Editor ..................................... . ................................... . ......... Clint Claybrook Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldsu)n As~istant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson S~.ff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan G~, Billy Bryant Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers. Robert Weans, Gad Young, blood Legals ................... ~ ................................................................................. Jayne Goldgon Circulation Manager ............................................................ ~ .............. Tracy Lynn Wya, Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grocllowski Pressroom Assislants. ................... /.arty Colleges. Z~ldi Dixon,Darnell McCauky Mailroom Distribution ............................................................................... David Bcggs Comm~a~ O~noms P~esidem ............................................................................................ 2dillard B. Cremes Vice President .................................................................................. Charloue S. Executive Vke President and Secretary ........................................ [,aura Grimes Cder Trefisarer ....................................................................................... K=hy Grimes Gm~ Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................. James S. Grimes gency lane when the engine overheats. I ONLY FLY in airplanes in extreme emergencies. Like when the train doesn't go there, the bus company is on strike or I go temporarily insane. I even hate airports. First thing you see at an airport is a sign that says "terminal." Airports are noisy, crowded and usually a $15 cab ride from the hotel, plus tip. The stewardess said she has been flying for 12 years. "I've only been in one real emergency," she said. "I was in a two-engine prop and we lost power in both engines. We were directly over Palm Beach so we just glided to a safe landing." Nothing to it. But engines don't always goout over Palm Beach. Try gliding into Brasstown Bald, for instance. I have tried to overcome my difficulties with flying. I decided drinking before boarding would be the answer. I scheduled a flight and then went to the airport bar. A day before the flight. There isn't enough booze on earth, I discovered, to make me relax on an air- plane. A NUMBER of bad things have happened to me on air- planes. Once, I stepped on a woman's violin case while try- ing to get past her to a win- dow seat. She called me awful names for two hours and tried to hit me with what used to be a violin. Another time, I had to sit next to a religious nut on an airplane. I had rather be hit on the head with a broken vio- lin than sit next to a religious nut. "Brother," he said to me, "do you know the Lord?" I said I knew of Him. "Are you ready tomeet Him?" I looked out the window. We were 20,000 feet and climbing. "I thought this was the Milwaukee flight," I said. When I fly, I like for pilot to have gray hair arrival at our Something to live for words. "I dated a pilot for years," said the "I'll never forget the day broke up. He called me the airport, just before off. We had an awful fight; I hung up on him." "Was he/nad?" I "Was he mad?" He the plane away from the and rammed one of the into another plane. was one to pout." A pouting pilot. I am going to be sick. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, HOME NEWS IS CARRYING ED COLL~bINS BY THE ] GRlZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN BY MOREIAND, AND BECAME MOST WmELY READ WRITER OF HIS PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND WIDE. Technology: I'm Lost as a Betsy Last Tuesday evening I ~t2~ntS,,have"wellround ~'Oo~gpTPmlestaW~lken.OteS~l~ was assigned to cover a tech- Just recently I read where some county high schools planned to require 24 units for graduation from high schoolafter this school year. Reasoning given for more units was to expose high school students to a greater variety of subject matter. tion. ..$IXTY,.~ YFARS~ AGO' when:I Was ~: senlor inhigh school, we were required to 4aass 16 required college prep courses ff we wanted a diplo- ma that would get you into any college. You could earn a certifi- cate with 16 units of subjects not considered college prep at that time such as art, music, health, agriculture, mechan- ics and other subjects that deviates from "reading, writ- ing and arithmetic." Now the trend in educa- tion is to requir" e all students be exposed to a great variety of subject matter to broaden the students' education. "I look on these children with envy and realize what I have misset " I am a perfect example of a mistake in education of the past. Very few could be less equipped for modem tech- nology than I, but it is grati- fying to know that today's 50 Years Ago I WAS SHOCKED to le~ the state will no longer p for instruction in keybo~ ing in either middle school high school. Now this must be tau~ ~ from Pre-K through elem~ M tary schools. My 10-year d C( granddaughter makes If" C; feel stupid with her kno~ ~pt edge of comp/~ters that associated with modern te~ nology. I look on these childr~ with envy and realize wh~ have misse~ Someone asked recently how I got along the business world for tho many years with very lit~ mechanical knowledge. I them I had the very best pc pie working for me at Veneer plant and married best mechanical minded son I know to take care of a~ problems that might arise~ home. Inthe Hogansville Herald Pree~um~tothe~t~mt~ *HE WAS RIGHTI - An article in the Jan. 4,1954 Hogans HerOd about a spae by Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. quoted him saying, ~Economic hardship and disadvan- continue into the future if present govem- ment recommendations affecting the textile industry are carried out? Allen apparently knew what he was talking about, as evi- denced by the hundreds of workers at mills in LaGrange learned 50 years later when' West Point Stevens last week announced lhe closing of two mills there plus another in Valley, Aia. UNDERSTANDABLE MOTIVATION - An inside blurb noted, "Now that color TV i has had the FCC's green light for produc- Mon~ in colo( TO THE LIMff - A large display ad ~o( new Tdple Economy 1954 Ford dump Imeks pointed out lhat they could "haul all the load the law allo~." A TIME FOR LAUGHS- Comedies were booked at the Royal Theatre, apparently to offset the gloom of winter. Movies included Bob Hope in "Here Come the Gifts" and Abbott and Costello in "Africa Screams." In i addition to several westerns, James Cagney in =A Lion in the Streets" was also offered. FROM THE CLASSIREDS-" Wanted: old single and double face red seat V'~oria phonogra~ records..." PRICES FROM THE GOOD OLD DAYS - Jack's Cafe advertised barbecue sandwiches for 15 cents, and free delivery on all orders of $1 o~ mo~.