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Manchester, Georgia
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January 16, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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January 16, 2003
 

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Opinions & Idea,: THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O4O A C6rim uhlkau Millard B. Grimes, Predclent MIKE HALE PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRECFOR JOaN KtWKENDAI ASSOCIATE PUBLISHEEDITOR ROB 17dCI',ARDSON ASSISTrr EDn'o JAYNE GOLDSTON BUStNVS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Criminal Activity Is Drug Related If you haven't seen it, there's a great commercial on television that talks about how drug money helps fund terrorism and other criminal activity throughout the world. Unfortunately, the com- mercial doesn't touch on many of the other things that come from drug sales. A major portion of the criminal activity in the United States are drug related. A large num- ber of the thefts and violent crimes in the nation, and the world, can be attributed to some type of drug activity. While none of this comes as a surprise to anyone, the cost of the criminal activity to you the taxpayer is astounding. Because of the thefts, your insurance rates on your home and cars are on the increase. That's right, because of the theft in homes and items such as CD play- ers and electronics being taken from cars, and the theft of cars as well, have sent your insurance costs up. Unfortunately, that is not an estimated 35,800 firearm- related hospital admission nationwide. The GHA study, using data from a similar time period, shows that Georgia had 5,181 admissions. In 1996, Georgia ranked seventh in the nation for the number of firearm-related deaths. THE GHA STUDY also found that: * In 1996,1,249 Georgians died from the use of firearms. This translates to 16.9 deaths per 100,000 people, which is above the national average of 12.9. *The average cost of treating a patient injured by a firearm in Georgia ranges from $15,000 to $20,000. An intensive care stay for such a patient can cost as much as the only barden;tahe taxpay-': $150,000 to $200,000, er has to deal with. It is not * Eighty percent of just the tax payer that suf- fers, businesses suffer as well, especially hospitals. AS WE ALL know, crimi- nal activity is certainly the reason for most violenk crimes in the nation, espe- cially those that are gun relat- ed. Most gunshot victims come from robberies, street violence, etc. and most of those occur because someone is trying to finance a drug habit, or over a drug deal that has gone bad. Those incidents cost us greatly, because of such eases involving people who do not have insurance, our hospital costs are going up just like our insurance costs. A national study released recently, found that injuries from gunshots cost hospitals $802 million a year. A student by the Georgia Hospital Association (GHA) has com- pleted an internal study indi- cating that gunshot injuries in Georgia cost hospitals in the state almost $54 million each year. The study found that 38 percent of the costs incurred, roughly $205. mil- lion, were not covered by insurance. The national study, which was published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, tracked 1997 hospital admis- sion data, the most recent year with complete data, .and determined that there were patients who suffer injuries from violence are uninsured or eligible for government medical care assistance, where payment my be only 40 to 60 percent of hospital costs. I WAS DISCUSSING this with a friend the other day and he asked, "Are you one of those people that think we should do away with guns?" Certainly not. In Georgia, just like most of the south, most men like to hunt. Hunters don't go around shooting people, they shoot game. Besides, it's not the people that purchase guns at a reputable dealer that go out and shoots people. It's the guns that are bought on the street that are used in most violent crimes. This column in no way is about gun control, it is about drug control. Illegal drugs are slowly, but surely, eating away at our nation. This is just one example of what it cost us, there are hundreds of others. The point of this column is a simple one. Since we all know that most criminal activity is drug related. We must do a better job educat- ing our children about the hazards of drugs. The only way to win the war against drugs is through educating our children and keeping as many of them as possible off drugs. TilE HOANSVILLE HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing C(npany, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR suRscmm-torcs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manago= Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. P'rMAS'rER: Send address changes to P. O, Box 426, Hogansv file, GA 30230. STAFF F'ublisher and Advertising Direc!or. .............................................................. Mike Hale Asvziate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson SlaffWrite .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Karen Grant Comlx)sing .................................................................. Valinda Ivery, Dewayne Flowers Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager ..................................................................................... Judy Crews Production Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski lhessroom ........................................... Damell McCautey, ,loey Knight, Larry Colleges CORPORATE OFFICERS president ............................................................................................. Milhu'd B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. .................................. '. ................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counl and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILI00 HOME NEWS - JAN. 16, 2003 Can't Deny It-No Spot Is So Dea!00s Written in 1978 On a cold day last week, I stood outside the church in my hometown of Moreland that is so dear to my child- hood and tried to remember how long it had been since I was inside. Ten years? At least that long. But if there weren't still roots here would I come back so often in my mind? Church was about all we had. Sunday school was at 10, but preaching was only twice a month. We shared sermons and the preacher with anoth- er flock down the road. What did they call it on Sunday night? MYF? We had a couple of rowdy brothers in town that broke into a store. They were juvenile first offenders. Their punishment was to attend Methodist Youth Fellowship for six months. First night they were there, they beat up two fifth: graders and threw a Cokesbury hymnal at the lady who met with us and always brought cookies. She ducked in time and then looked them squarely in their devilish eyes. Soft as the angel she was, she said, "I don't approve of what you boys did here tonight and nei- ther does Jesus. But if he can forgive you, I guess I'll have to." She handed them a plate of cookies, and last I heard, both are daddies with steady jobs and rarely miss a Sunday. That was the first miracle I ever saw. Revivals at the chiarch were the highlight of the sum- mer. I remember a young vis- iting preacher talking about the night he was converted. "I was drunk in an Atlanta bar," he said, "and I was lost. But Jesus walked in and sat down beside me. Praise His name, because that's the rea- son I'm here with you tonight." That frightened me. If Jesus could find that fellow in an Atlanta bar, he certain- ly wouldn't have any trouble walking up on me smoking behind the pump house in Moreland. I always took an extra look around before lighting up after that. Workers were smoking one day in the attic of our church. They left a cigarette. It took less than an hour for flames to destroy that old building. I didn't cry, but grown men did. We built it back  of brick this time. Country folks will dig deep in the name of the Ird. THE BEST fried chicken I ever ate, the best iced tea I ever drank were the fried me at the same her I would and I haven't. altar. I Homecoming Day at the church. Dinner on the grounds, we called it. The chickens had been walking in someone's backyard earlier in the morning. The tea went into a galvanized washtub. A piece of block ice kept it cold. The day Red Murphy died, they announced it in the church. The congregation wept as one. Everyone loved Red Murphy. He ran the lit- tle post office and took chil- dren on pony rides. Maxine Estes taught my Sunday school class. In rural Georgia in the 50s, she was big on being kind to your neighbor no matt the color of his skin. I learld to sing Hymn No. 153, "Love, Mercy and Grace," in that church. And "What a Friend We Have in Jesus." And the one I till break into occasionally today, "precious Memories." They do linger. My mother married my stepfather inside that church. And one hot Saturday after- noon a long time ago, a pret- IT'S EASY to fall from the church, no the closeness in times I have done it. So have Grown people can do as please. The 10:30 morning movie is excus{ ni a lot earlier. I never could myself to walk inside my church last week. But Sunday I will. And maybe I'll put in the collection plate, maybe they'll have and iced tea, and maybe aft ward I'll make a habit of i There is a new coun{ song out. An old man singing to a group of fel] derelicts. "Lean on Jest goes the chorus, "before leans 5n you." I'm not one to panic, it's something to think abd BY SPECIAL ARRANGEM WITH HIS WIIW, DEDRA, THE HI NEWS IS ,CARRYING SEIC1 COLUMNS BY THE LATE LE GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN N] BY MORELAND, AND BECAME 1 MOST WIDELY READ GEORI WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZAI BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STH.L A ABLEFORSALETHROUGH BAD B{ PRODUCTIONS, p.o. BOX 191 ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NAT chicken and iced, tea on ty 19-year-old girl married WIDE. p The Valley of the Shadow of Deat[ Probably one of the most familiar chapters in the Bible is Psalm 23, and that Psalm contains probably one of the most familiar verses in the Bible. Aside from John 3:16, Psm:-'c've r y well be one of the most popular verses of scripture. At almost every funeral home you can find the 23rd Psalm displayed somewhere or quoted on an information cai:d about the deceased. The point is, many a heart has sought refuge in the 23rd Psalm. As I sit here this morning and ponder the deaths that have touched the lives of our church members the last year, I realize that many peo- ple still have questions about death. Just a quick glance at a mall bookstore and the world's fascination about the unseen world of the dead will be obvious. Even in the old- est book of the Bible, Job, questions arose about death. However, most of the inter- est in death is on the spiritu- al side of things rather than the physical. Due to the great advances in medical technol- ogy, there aren't many ques- tions that are left unanswered in regards to physical death. There has been some debate in the medical world as to what constitutes death. In no way am I prepared to settle that issue, but one thing I can say is thaf th is not a ceasing to exist. The Bible teaches that death is a separation. In scrip- ture three types of death can be found. The first and maybe the most obvious type of death is physical death. Physical death is a separation of the soul and spirit from the body. The body dies, but the essence of that person lives on. On a less familiar side is spiritual death. Spiritual death is a separation of a per- son from God. In Ephesians 2, the Bible calls it being dead in trespasses and sin. In most church circles spiritual death is described as being lost or unsaved, a condition that Christ came to remedy on the cross. The third and final type of death is what the Bible calls the 'second death.' Revelation 20:14 says, "And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death." II ;[::::?:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: This death is an eternal sep- aration from God. If not remedied by the blood of Jesus, spiritual death will lead to the second death. AS MACABRE as all of this may sound, there is a bright spot, a ray of hope to encourage us. The apostle Paul tells us in I Corinthians 15:55-57, "O death, where is thy sting? 0 grave, where is thy victory? The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ." This is why David can call the valley of death but a shadow. When Jesus died on the cross, was buried and rose again, the sting offdeath and the power of the grave were defeated. Now to the child of God death is but a shadow through which he must pass. Death is door that leads to a place. Just as a shadow dog cannot bite, for Christian dying death has no bite. Now for those of us W are left behind;there will a sense of loss and a time! mourning. We do miss 0 friends and loved ones our hearts are heavy. But! someone has said, "Christi 1 mourn for their saved lo ones, but they do not have! grieve as those who have . hope.". The Bible teaches t there will be a reunion of = saints of God in Heaven. when death touches our li just remember David s when he walked through valley of the shadow of de he would fear no evil beca "thou art with me thy rod thy staff they comfort m Alt of those three deat mentioned at the beginni were of those who had the timony of being saved. those families let me say fl the grave is not the end your loved one, but only beginning of a wonde eternity with God in Heav 50 Years Ago... In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor tothe Hogansville Home News *CALL RIPLEY, QUICK: des were featured on the front page of the 15, 1953 Hogansville Herald. Mr. and Lem Gay of South Highway raised a turni that weighed over 28 pounds. cluded that Mrs. Gay "fears they will be ing turnips for some time? Also, a collie dog whose rabies tag traced to Hogansville was found wandedn( Austin, Texas. NEW HEAD HONCHO: "Mr. Crawford was installed by Col. Fleming" for two-year term as Hogansville mayor. ACTIVE CLUB: "John I. Todd Post. 152 of the Amedcan Lec earned a Meritorious Service Citation enrolling more 1953 members by Dec. 31i 1952 than the previous peak membership the Post for an entire year." FUTURE STARS: New officers for the Hogansville Teen-Age Club included Fran Reeves, president; Nita Fay Craft, vice-pres' dent; Earline Pike, treasurer; and Carolin Brock, secretary."