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Manchester, Georgia
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January 20, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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January 20, 2000
 

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OP'I N ION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JANUARY 20, 2000 t ( THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 MInE HALZ PLrSLiSrm/ADVTISING Dn'roR JOHN KLaT, Zr,L ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER]EDITOR BRYAN GgrER ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS IANAGFR - Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Offwiol Legal Organ, City of Hogama,ille Do Seatbelts Really Help Save Lives ? I make no quip about it! I do not like to wear seatbelts. I was not brought up to wear them around my waste and shoulder when I'm driving. I never have liked them and I probably never will gel used to them. Teenagers and small chil- dren seem to have no problem 'buckling up'. I guess it is what you get used to. I don't buy into "Buckle Up, It Saves Lives." I do not believe you are going to die until the Lord gets ready for you. When he gets ready for you a seat- belt won't save you. I do agree seatbeats may keep you from having'broken bones or being ejected from the vehicle ff a wreck occurs. The only reason I do wear the strap is to prevent paying a traffic ticket. Then I hear the same law- makers Who passed the seat- belt law.say it is a priviledge for one to have drivers licens- es. They continue by saying, "don't lose that priviledge" by speeding, driving and drinking or taking drugs. I'm for laws to prevent speeding, drinking and driving, and drugs. But a seatbelt has never caused a person to wobble or dip across the centerline. It has never caused one to lose con- trol due to excess speed. What would happen if we all lost our licenses. The ear dealers, gas stations, resta- raunts, retail outlets would probably go out of business. Look at what the driver does for our country, our state, our county and our. city. We keep America going. We buy licenses, insurance, tags, tires, and p for the vehicle, jilst to namea few, to be able to drive on our roads which are paid for with our taxes. And ta that a priviledge? "A seatbelt has never caused a person to wobble or dip across the center line. It has never caused one to lose control..." They tell us how to drive, where to drive and when to drive. I am in favor of child safe- ty seat laws and helmets for young bicyclists, even though we didn't have them when I was young. We got along without them. But why are the taxicabs and vehiles operated for hire exempt by law from safety restraints and belts? Why are pickup trucks, motorcycles, motor-driven cycles, vehicles equipped for off-the-road use exempt? Did you know if you had a written statement from the doctor, if you operate a vehi- cle in reverse, delivering news- papers, driving a vehicle model prior to 1965, rural letter car- riers in passenger vehicles while performing duties for the United State Postal Service, or a passenger vehicle perform- hag an emergency service you do not have to wear a seatbelt? If our lawmakers are so concerned with our welfare, let's in return pray for our offi- cials, because is there so much alcohol consumption and immortality in Washington D.C. It is our duty to pray for them. No doubt, they need the prayers and we need the prac- rice. "Husbands Have Been Wondering" Well now, I just got to think- ing, how many of you men, espe- cially husband, understand women, especially wives, and how many men, especially hus- bands, understand womens', especially wives', purses, or bet- ter known as pocketbooks? If your answer is "I do" or "Maybe" I strongly urge you to go to Church this Sunday and beg for forgiveness for you have broken one of the Commandments (Exodus 20:16). Don't blame yourself, for it all started with Adam and Eve. to deviate a bit I sometimes won- der if Eve wasn't made first. Here she was, in the garden with nothing to do but frolic and play with snakes and be happy, but she had no one to admonish, "I wouldn't do that, if I were you," or "You said you would do that yesterday" or "You should go to the doctor," so Adam was made to take up the slack. Anyway, it all started there and has been going on ever since. After they ate the apple, some changes were made and Eve went out and put on a few fig leaves and made herself a little fig-leaf pocketbook to put more apples in, and when she came back to Adam he wondered, "What has Eve got hidden with those fig leaves and in that little green pocketbook," and husband, we have been wondering ever since. A pocketbook is a woman's own and man's had shall not enter there-in. Say you are going on a little trip and you get in the car and wait while the wife digs in her pocketbook for the car keys. After going through sev- eral pounds of various and sundry, she says, "The. keys must be in my white pocket- book." You say, "Just wait here and I'll get them." She jerks and almost screams, "O no, I'll go!" she doesn't want the husband to go into that pocketbook. What is in it? Has she won the Publishers Clearing House Sweepstakes and it was crammed with big bills having pictures of Jackson or Grant on them? does it contain letters from old boyfriends and pic- tures of Burr Reynolds? You will never know for a woman's, especially wives', pocketbook is off limits for all men, especial- ly husbands. I know of a case in point. My uncle, Jim Bob, enjoyed shoot- ing a little pool. He was always short of change so he would send Aunt suzy out to the barn to cheek on the cow, and while she was out he would go into her pocketbook to garner any change hidden under the"stuff". Now Aunt Suzy knew he was doing this and didn't like it worth a nickel. Knowing Uncle Jim Bob was deathly snakes, she caught snake and put it in book. The next sent out to check just waited in the heard a loud scream Bob came running house ing the snake. He toward the Alabama crossed it, not ferry, snake and all. reached the Limits and fell down ly exhausted. said he held the up and looked him saying, "Son, if you bite, go ahead, for as we are going Jim Bob never Suzy's pocketbook a that matter, ever game of pool. So, let's face never understand their pocketbooks glad they are around 1 understood. People Who Need Higher Taxes There's a big cry out there to tax the rich. In Congress they scream, "Tax the rich!" They don't mean it, of course, since they're all rich, but it sounds good and might get them reelected so they can come back to Washington and get even richer. They say President Bush doesn't want to tax the rich. That's because he doesn't know anybody who isn't rich, and that wouldn't be a very nice way to treat your friend. On the other hand, he could change his mind. AS fOR 'r'00e000000ainly think the rich should do their part. But I don't think you can just say, "Tax the rich!" Not every person who is rich got that way by the same route. The rich should be taxed at rates they deserve, and I have devised my own plan. I don't think people who got rich because they were smart and thought of a great idea and then busted their tails to make the idea work should be harsh- ly penalized for making a few million honest bucks. I don't think people who rose from meager beginnings and worked eighteen hours a day, seven days a week for years until they finally made it should suffer unduly, either. BUT THERE ARE groups "I don't think peo- ple who rose from meager beginnings and worked eighteen hours a day, seven days a week for years until they finally made it should suffer undu- ly, either." of rich people I think we should stick it to. Send the IRS in with guns and just take what we think we need to help get us out of this financial mess we're in. You asked for it, and here it is -- The rich People I'd Tax Out of Their Assets: THE LUCKY-SPERM- CLUB RICH: These are people who just happened to be born in the right place at the right time, the ones who caught the old Fallopian Tube of Fortune. I'd nail these people, too. 10% of their annual earnings for every sofa in their man- sions that looks like it once was practors. an animal that lived in or near a jungle. THE SLIME-BALL RICH: This would include dope and smut dealers, almost every- body currently involved in the film industry (Jessica Tandy being one of the exceptions), anybody who made a lot of money on the polyester hoax that was pulled on the country in the seventies, and the Rev. Al Sharpton. If he doesn't have a lot of money, just take what THE JOCK RI Tyson, all boxing pr 1 Jose Canseco, Deionl  , and anybody who hold F 117 .days and then $20.3 million and later|  credit to the Lord fo b I him win the game. An{ Steinbrenner. THE ADVEIt RICH: Find all the peal got rich after being et 1 public office. First, le he has for being loud and obnox- ious. : ,:L,uc THE COULDN'T-WE- HAVE-DONFWITHOUT- THEM? RICH: Rich chiro- EveryOody  1 plan can help by ;o'tk'I an incumbent everylI they get. .... II ..... I I |1 I ...... FDR Explains Some Causes of Inflation to Reporters FYank Roosevdt was for- ever explaining problems and policies ia terms of personal experiencs, These anecdotes were so well suited to whatev- er point he was making at the time that they provoked a fair- ly widespread mspickm that he was sometimes creative in these endeavors. The ever skeptical press corps certainly felt that way and even needled the President about it at tim. "Once during World War II, Rdt explain away infla- tion by tlltag the reporters about a "foreman" friend of his who complained about the high cost of living. The President intetrogated  and found out his complaint wU based on the high cost of out of season straw- berries. The President lectured his foreman, or so he told the press, and thus through the press, the nati Lat at a press conference (on May 30, 1944) a question arose regarding, raising the price ceiling on certain com- modities and textiles. He began a sort of free auoclation remi- ninisce about how certain Goor00 wanted higher cot- ton That led to rmawks that he, himself, speaking as a tree farmer, knew that the $29 per thousand board feet he was then getting for his lumber in Georgia was a good price, but "thinking personally and self- ishly, I would like to see lumber selling at $79 per thousand. Well, I suppose we all have that streak in us. If you pick out cotton, you will have somebody else on your neck, and then - then you will get inflation. But if you do it for one - I suppose one out of ten - you ought to do it for almost any- thing that grows. "Substantially the price that asparagus and some other things bring is ,a pretty good price, and I know it has made the cost of buying asparagus in the White House awfully high. This is the asparagus season. "Which reminds me of a friend of mine, a foreman of one of the substantial trades, who came in last January and said to me, 'I have an awful time when I go home,' he said. 'My old lady is ready to hit me over the head with the dishpan.' "I said, `what's the trouble?' ''he costof living." "Well, 'I said,'what for instance?" ''Well, last night I went home and the old lady said "What's this I went out to buy asparagus and do you see what I got? Three sticks. A dollar and a quarter. it's an outrage.' "I looked at him and I said, 'Since when have you been buy- hag asparagus in January, fresh asparagus?' "Oh, 'he said. 'I never thought of that.' "Well I said, ell that to your old lady with my compliments" A reporter tried to interrupt. "Mr President, is that_" Roosevelt continued over the question. "You get a lot of that." The reporter finished his 'question. "is that the same foreman who bought the straw- berries in winter?" There was what the official stenographer described as "(Much laughter)." Roosevelt plowed in. "It hap- pened to be a different one, but it's all right. Still makes a true StOry." Reporter: "I just wondered if it was the same foreman that came in then." (More laughter) Judge Rosenan, who wrote many of Roosevelt's speeches, said that the President made many characters and meetings. Rex Tugwell thought he at least "overworked" his firsthand knowledge of common people, but Tugwell agreed that Roosevelt did in fact learn a "...I would like to see lumber selling at $79 per thousand." great deal from encounters with them in everyday situations - more so in Georgia than in New York. Marvin McIntyre, the President's White House aide, once said. "The story of a farmer who had been ruined by a bank failure, told him at Warm Springs that it had much to do with the law insuring bank deposits." In fact, Roosevelt personal- ly knew several Georgia farm- ers whose lives were greatly harmed, ff not actually ruined, by bank failures, including the Doyle family, whose farm he bought. Bank failures began early in Georgia. They were wide- spread.The Georgia Warm Springs Foundation lost $1416.09 due to a bank failure. Roosevelt apparently lost some personal funds the year before when a chain of small Georgia banks, including sev- eral in the vicinity, closed. He witnessed a bank failure there even before that. After 1927, he began bank- hag in Manchester at the bank of political operator James Peters. Roosevelt had met Peters earlier and became a reg- ular visitor to the ste ] seminars at Peters ' Roosevelt did a lot of 1 as Georgia business cussed their experienc local hard times that w r, binger of the national t probably did more tall listening, but as in his[ sation with forema asparagus, both sides t edly learned somethin (next Week; Georgi 70 years ago) T Hocsvn HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Pub Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Mane Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Seco postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR SUCRWTIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manage Meuy Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manches, Georgia 31816.. R: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 3 Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Associate Publisher aad Editor ................................................................ John Kuyla Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne C Staff Writers ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy ] Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie A.dvedsing Sales .............................................................................................. Lmda l#aotoy .............................................................................................. Michael C. Composing .................. . .......................................................... Vatinda lvery, Deborah l.egnls ................................................................................................................. Valind Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Clet Production Manager ......................................................................................... Roland l Prmmmm ........................................................... :.....David Boggs and Wayne Grocb ax Oms President ........................................  ........................................................... Millard B. 6 Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. sam ................................................................................................ Laura c, an 1Mmsurex ............................................... ............................................... Kathy Grimes 0 Counsel and Assistant Secretary ..................................................... James S. O