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Manchester, Georgia
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January 23, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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January 23, 2003
 

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Opinions &amp; Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVI HOME NEWS - JAN. 23, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 620-040 A (6rilttce lhtSlh:atm. Millard B. Gdmes, President MInE HALE PUBLIStlER/ADVERTISING DIR JOHN K ASSOCIATE PUBLISHIGR]EDITOR ROB RICHAgOSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOWN BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 E O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Officials Should Be Given Respect I love sports and most of my readers know that. I've played, coached and even spend time when I can offici- ating, umpiring and referee- ing, but lately I've had second thoughts about continuing the time I spend as an official. There was a time when officials were respected and coaches, players and fans would grumble a little about calls. Today, however, it is going far beyond that and frankly, sometimes the con- frontations get out of hand. A prime example, this past year while officiating youth football, I had a coach scream onto the field, "If he holds you again, break his arm." Now, if a coach can take that attitude about an oppos- ing teams nine year old play- er, imagine the kind of abuse he can give an official. Because of the alarming number of physical assaults they face, Bob Still, commu- nications manager for the National Association of Sports Officials (NASO), has folders on incidents from across the country, and his folders keep growing. He gathers reports of despicable parents, co,h-" es and players attackingoffi-- cials or threatening them with bats, knives and guns. "We happen to live in a society where we tend to blame other people when things don't go our way, and to me, that's a major reason why so many sports parents blame the ump if. the kid strikes out," Still says. "It's not a question of whether the kid ever learned how to hit properly. He struck out look- ing because the ump didn't know the strike zone. The ump has become an easy target for frustrated parents who want to blame someone." This does not mean that all parents, coaches and play- ers are guilty of unsports- manlike behavior. Thankfully, most spectators and partici- pants understand that they must respect the official and his judgement at all costs. But, a large number do not, unfor- tunately. WHEN AN OFFICIAL takes to the field or court, he's usually very confident. He realizes that the game does sometimes rest upon the close calls he makes, but he relies on his training and experience to help him do a good job. He understands that when he makes a call it's going to make .50 percent of the entire attendance happy and the other 50. percent unhappy. But, he walks away feeling confident he made the best call he could. It does not mean it's always the right call, but it's the call he felt was right. Coaches, players and par- ents often forget that officials spend countless hours prepar- ing, just as teams do. Most attend seminars, training ses- sions, etc. in an effort toget better at what they do. The other thing that people some- times forget is that a play on the field, with you close up, sometimes is not actually what someone might think they see from a different view. HERE IS A good example of that. One day, while calling the plate in a senior boys game, a runner came fast and furious to the plate from third base on a ball that was hit to the first baseman. The first baseman tags the bag and sling ,the ball home to the' catcher. The catcher bent down and the player slid into the tag. "He's safe!" I yelled. The entire stands on one side of the field erupted. Folks were screaming at me for being blind. The coach came running out of the dugout screaming and hollering. Never called a time out, never asked what happened, he just wanted to tell me how blind I was. I listened for a couple of minutes and ejected him from the game. After the game, he asked me why I called the opposing player safe when it was evi- dent his catcher had made the tag. I explained the catcher didn't have the ball, A week later, the coach walked up tQ me and told me his wife was taping the game. When he got home and saw the tape, it was clear the catch- er didn't have the ball. But, there was no way he could have seen that from the dugout. Officials, contrary to pop- ular belief, do not do it for the money. It costs them much more in equipment and trav- el than they usually make. They do it for the love of the game, and because they want to stay close to the games they love. They do make mistakes, but all humans do. However, it is important to remember that without them, there wouldn't be any games at all. "[lie HO(;,NSYIt.I.E HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchesten; Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in "fi-oup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR SUSSCRWOrCS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Gecngia 31816. Pt rs'l'M,.<rtm: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Busine Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Fxlitor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWfito .......................................................................... Bryan Getcr, Billy Bryant Assistant Advelising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Karen Grant Composing .................................................................. Valinda lvery. Dewayne Flowers Lcgals ....................................................  ................................................. Jayne Goldston CinYculation Manager. .................................................................................... Judy Crews Pnxtuction Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager ........................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressrm ........................................... 11 McCauley, Joey Knight, Larry Colleges C.om,oPr OmcE Fh'esiden! ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice Iesidenl .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Here I Am, Interviewing Written in 1978 chemical dump. I am using Isitastrainon an IBM Selectric II type- I getlettersfromjournal- writer that make strange Absolutely not. I 1l:: u ismstudentsandotherassort- sounds like a semi hauling migraine headaches, st{ie ' ed weirdos wanting to know hogs through Holly Springs, ach pains, dizzy spells, ni&: howI goabout puttingtogeth- Mississippi, on a hot July mares, hallucinatidL_ column five days a week. afternoon: ingrown toenails, smok__ era'I have to write a paper "Grrrrrrrrrooooooooink!" cough and my back is sll  for my JRL 101 class," began When your IBM Selectric Other than that, I am in 1 one recent letter, "and I have II typewriter makes that feet health for a 65-year chosenyouasmytopic.Iwant sound, what do you think of? Youbetcha.Justinthelast malaria victim. to know, in at least 2,000 The odor of overcrowded two months, I have been to Is it necessary to drir Gel words, how you go about put- hogs in a steam bath, and pos- Memphis and Birmingham. be a good columnist? . ting a column together five sible death by electrocution. Memphis was closed after That is a common m#er days a week. Has anybody ever suf- dark and under martial law, but a young person settk. "I need your response no fered serious injury or even but the hotel in Birmingham out on a career as a col Ou: later than two weeks from death in an accident involv- had one of those neat revolv- nist should avoid drinkin_s ol Friday. Please double-space hag an electric typewriter? ing restaurants like the Hyatt all costs. It is certainly IV. Sl and try to avoid typographi- Yes. One daya skinny reli- Regency in Atlanta. necessary to drink to Ith. cat errors as the instructor glen reporter got his tie hung Unfortunately, the one in good columnist. It is a grgr h, counts off for that." in the paper roller of is elec- Birmingham was in the base- help on the days you are aU Ou: The student who wrote tric typewriter. In a vain ment. one, however, es the letter will probably grow attempttoremoveit, herolled Last year, I got to go to In summary then, whahnt to be a good columnist. Getter his head into his machine and the Indianapolis 500 automo- the most difficult part of th. other people to do your work was typedto deathby alower bile race. What an interest- ing a daily column (a) s. is a cornerstone of this pro- case 'j' and an out-of-control ing event that was. It was the research; (b) the actual xriot fession, ampersand, most mental illness I have ing; (c) the need for a 0chi] Since it is impossible for Do readers sometimes seen at any one time. stant flow of the creatt be me to answer all such callandsuggesteolumnideas Approximately what are juices; or (d) crazies thrCS inquiries, I have decided to you? your working hour,2 ening to break your handi'd t today to interview myself on Every day. Recently an I am on call24 hours a day. Admitting to myself t[Ha the subject of writing a col- anonymous caller suggested No story is ever too big or too I can't hold down a reffOo umn for the benefit of inter- I do a column on the most small for a good columnist, job. ITa ested students and my boss. handsome, best dressed If the bartender forgot totell [1 be I know my'boss is inter- sportscaster on Atlanta tele- you the office called, howev- BY SPECIAL ARRANGEM hW ested because just the other vision, er, it's not your fault. WITHmSWIDOW, DEDRA, THEItUa: NEws Is CARRYING sgIC]ny day he asked me, "Grizzard, Did you follow the sug- Who are the most diffi- COLUMNS BY THE LATE LI" how canyou do this to me five gestion? cult people to interview? GmZZARO, WHO GREW UP IN r_ u days a week?" Of course not. I knew it Those whose names BY MORELANO, ANn BECAME pu. Here, then, is the inter- was Harmon the minute he recently appearedin the obit- MOST WmELV READ GEOho WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZAI_ l view, conducted in my office, mispronounced "Robert uary column, anybody in BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL Ao n which is located near the Hall." Harrison's on Friday night ABLEFORSALETHROUGHBADI tn men's rest room and which is As a columnist, do you with a wedding ring in his PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 19JtCk GA 31118-1266 ANVjt o- 00S,CSTO00SNA00 recently got new carpet the have opportunities for excit- pocket and Korean soccer BOOK AND color of river water near a ing travel and adventure? players. WINE. i g 4S., --,I tybq Being Thankful for a Pretty Lady g iouAs:eghdlJ;smlsspereihnt;: hasFretnhep;Sprl2viYeeeers: ! ill busflme=a:earl:ea./ piness to those around you. cover the Manch ste  : greeted everybody wmr ",= 1 you:, :Wo'subhota- smiIM.y.eleetela  oo rorwara to every unaay pner wnere uoutse serves as ad  " morning at Manchester First a "greeter" with her usual me how to find him in ca# Baptist Church is the pretty smile, an emergency. ', smile of Louise Smith as she Unless the job he wasl strolls down the aisle greet- MANY TIMES I had to at the time was equally prd ing friends enroute to her caU the Smith home in the ing, he would find a stoplJ accustomed place in the pew. middle of the day or night for place and come running. :J l Louise Smith's friendly a machinery breakdown that smile when she greets you is required the expertise of a ONCE I had to call nothing new. skilled electrician before we repair a bubbling fountaff._. She has been greeting couldresume operation at the our back yard, where a so friends and acquaintances in Veneer ml. "Louise Smith's event was planned later in this manner since l first knew Louise Smith would  smile when day. I believe this time LotP "' her, which will be 44 years in always greet me with that she greets you is tracked him down ha May. friendly voice and usually morning coffee with frie It was not only through knew where we could find nothg new." but she found him and s the church I got to know and him. this problem was solved. appreciate Louise. She responded to my call Louise Smith's frie# Her late husband, Jesse as if she understood the prob- smile is evidence of a ha W. Smith, was a friend and lem and the necessity of life she enjoys with her G served asour electrician dur- tracking down her already many called him was locat- her church, her club, ing our early years in busi- overworked husband, ed, it was only a matter of friends, and family. ,- ness at the Veneer Mill in Once Jesse W. Smith or time before my immediate Keep smiling, Prd Manchester. J.W. Smith, the electrician as problem was solved. JW's Lady! 50 Yea00 Ago ' It iit In the Hogansville Herald ,c Predecessor to the Hogansville Home New, HAPPY ENDING: The lost collie ' mentioned in the previous week's paper, ' was identitied as belonging to Mrs. John Cranston. The local pooch had beer - found wandering in Austin, Tex. but hi, F. rabies tag helped authorities identif I ( him. "Shag is being put throughthe dghl I channels to get back home." I I COLUMBUS MAN HAS MISHAP: I "Joe Bailey, Columbus, brother in law I of Dewey Evans, took a tumble in his I 1952 Ford sedan at Flat Creek on the Lone Oak Road Saturday night.' , I TRAFFIC CATASTROPHE I "Seven automobiles were involved ir a tangle at the Rock Hole last week when the heavy early morning fog caused the lead car to come to a com,Ii  plete stop, and five other cars and on(liB truck piled up behind the parked auto.m No one was injured. E GAS WHEN WILL TH BE TURNED ON? The . F. Wilder. Construction Company is asked this question on the average of 20 times  day by local citizenry and always answer has to be 'we don't know."