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Manchester, Georgia
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January 27, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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January 27, 2000
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVZLLE HOME NEWS - JANUARY 27, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A Grimes Publication Illard B. Gdmes, President USPS 62O-O4O Mn HAm PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOaN KtWgZNDJ.L ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR BRYAN GETER &c, SOCtaTE EDrmR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 O,ial ll, gal Orgm, City qf Hogan.wille Super Bowl Sunday The most watched and talked about sporting event of the year airs this weekend; The SUPER BOWL. I enjoy a good football game, but why does the big game always come on dur- ing church time? Some churches will call church services off due to the fact most of the congregation will not be there. What a shame! Others will start church ser- vices an hour or so earlier, where they can see the kickoff at 6 p.m. That's an idea! Some will even go to the extreme of bringing a big screen T.V. to the church's fel- lowship hall and have soup and sandwiches. I wonder how many will be thinking about the Lord's service, how many will be thinking about the Titans or the Rams and how many wiU be thinking about the sandwiches. Others will just plain, "lay- out" of services Sunday night- some with excuses and others with none. I hope the Holy Spirit is mov- ing this Sunday night like He did last Sunday night at our church. No Super Bowl can compare to the service we had at our church. I remember the first Super Bowl game. My family was vis- Ring relatives near Warm Springs.Theoldblackand white television was on. It was a game between the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas Cit] Chiefs. The date was January 15, 1967 at Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles. The late Elijah Pitts scored the first ever Super Bowl rush- ing touchdown for Green Bay before 61,946 fans. The Packers went on to win the contest, 35- 10. Bart Starr, the Packers quar- terback went 16 for 23 for 250 yards with two TD's and one interception. Vince Lombardi coached the Packers and Hank Strata coached the Chiefs. On August 14, 1959, Lamar Hunt, a Dallas businessman, called for the formation of the American Football League. It was organized and began play in 1960. Others in football thought the idea of a new conference was so crazy that they referred to the new conference teams as the "Foolish Club." As it turned out, the American Football League had a profound effect on profes- sional football. On June 8,1966, the AFL and the NFL announced a merger and the two new conferences played against each other at the end of the 1966 season in the first ever Super Bowl The Dallas Cowboys have appeared more than any other team,eight times, in the Super Bowl, winning 5 times and los- ing 3. has appeared six times but has only won twice San Francisco 49ers (5) and New York Giants (2) are unde- feated in Super Bowl play as are the New York Jets and the Chicago Bears. Both of the lat- ter teams have only appeared once in the Super Bowl. Buffalo and Minnesota are winless in four super Bowls tries. Cincinnati and New England have lost twice each while Philadelphia, LA Rams and San Diego have each lost their only appearance at the big dance. Atlanta lost its only appear- ance in their 33 year history in Super Bowl XXXIII. Individually, Joe Montana has gained more yards passing than any other quarterback. In 1989 against the Cincinnati Bengals, Montana was 23/36 for 357 yards. Steve Young leads the Super Bowl with six touch- down passes in 1995 against the San Diego Chargers. Timmy Smith leads the Super Bowl in rushing yards in 1988 as he he carried the pigskin 22 times for 204 yards and two TDs, when the Washington Redskins defeated the Denver Broncos, 42-10 in Super Bowl XXII. Roger Craig in 1985, Jerry Rice in 1990 and 1995, and Rickey Watters in 1995 all for San Fransisco, and Terrell Davis in 1998 for Denver all scored three touchdowns, mak- ing 18 points a Super Bowl high. Don Chandler in Super Bowl II, 1968 for Green Bay hit four field goals and three PATs for fifteen points, a record for a field goal/extra point kicker. The largest crowd ever to attend a Super Bowl was at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on HoGsvn HOME N is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rams by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes, Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. Foa SUBSCRIPTIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mcu Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchesler, Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to P. O Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAff Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Business Manager ........................................................................................ jayne Goldston Staff Writers ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linch l.ester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snidcr Composing ............................................................................. Valinda leery, Deborah Smith Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda leery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ......................................................................................... Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Groehowski COneOTg OmcEns President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte  Grin Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura  Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ..................................................... James S. Grinaes 'Who Has A Benjamin Air Rifle?' Well, now, I believe it was Thomas Wolfe who said, "You can't go home again." For what- ever it's worth, I disagree with old Tom. You can go home again; the only thing is you might not know it when you get there I remember the first time I went back to the big house in Antangaville, Alabama, where I lived until we moved to Georgia in 1925. The house had a long hall where you could ride your tricycle for hours. Out in the back yard was the biggest oak tree that ever grew. Well, I was back, but the "big" house changed to just a small frame house. The long hall where I had ridden my faithul tricycle to rescue girls in distress was so short that if you were not careful when you sent in the front door you would step out into the backyard and see that the giant oak was just ordinary and could be found all over Georgia and Alabama. Such things do happen even in later life. Back years ago some of us would save a few bucks and go to Panama City, Florida. There I knew where the best shrimp were and good deviled crabs. Knew it, as they say, like the palm of my hand. The wife and I went there for our first honeymoon and I did- n't know up from down. If it had not been for the wife find- ing our reservation, we would have spent our first night parked by the Gulf talking, no doubt, about the great oak I knew in Alabama. Last year, we went back for a third honeymoon, but that time I played it smart and did not open my fool mouth until we were safely in our reserva- tion. Things do change, some- times in the mind, sometimes actual, and as we approach senility, who can tell the differ- ence? Sometime back, we tried to do a bit about dirt roads and there is one I left out that has haunted me ever since It was not really a road, but a cow trail. It started at the Ware house and went to the pasture where we played ball. So far as I remem- ber, we never had a real base- ball. We bought some McConnels, but they were stuffed with cottonseed hulls and after a few Licks they were knocked flat and whompy- jawed. We made our own by wrapping string around the core of a golf ball and they did very well. The road started as bit. For some reason ii now (I guess the devil lct'o do it), I put in just tw fte and shot Crawford w _ sits down for break ,c yowled, jumped andd[: e S a red I trmd to hi . . . 11 Benjamin rifle to Sa us but he refused. Crawfng-v.]l, 1 th back ready to do battl E h is hard to do battle w le , S bing your taft wxth botlei r Crawford was huffy f0[ly days, but we were sti11'o I think it did him good, - he was elected as outl';" sentative, where he haS[e,,L yOU turned off the highway at the Ware's house. A car could drive down in dry weather. On the left was the cotton gin and a few other buildings. On the right was the Ware house, with Robert Ware's scrap pile I remember many a day going all over town to find scrap iron to sell. The proceeds were spent at William's cafe. One day, returning from a hard-fought baseball game, I was walking behind Crawford Ware. It so happened I had Frank Latimer's Benjamin air rifle in hand. You don't see them now, but the BB was propelled by compressed air and, with well and with dignity. 'or Well, I went back agt dirt road is now the cotton gin is gone, Ware house is gone. ball field. Houses along Ware Street, as called. Nothing tnle. rye often wonderedi put in four pumps, if C would have been elect{ ernor. But perhaps it isi now. The target is soa larger now, but I sti miss, and world would I find air rifle? Lessons Learned About Georgia Schools President Roosevelt told cottage in which I lived, a very might have been misle people in private meetings as young man came up to the the true state of affairs] well as in public ones that he porch and said, 'May I speak not been the sort to ssl learned lessons from simple to you, Mr. Roosevelt?' and I such experiences. He Ulrs made is conversations. Roosevelt once said, 'Yes.' so. In 1938 heGeorgianla told Fred Botts (according to "He came up to the porch speech in ( o Athens) Turnley Walker), as they and asked if I would come over University in " relaxedinfrontofthefireplace to such and such town  not he said this: in his cottage, "Down here at very far away from here-- and "Years ago, whe Warm Springs I can't general- deliver the diplomas at the came to Georgia, I wasp ize the way a politicians sup- commencement exercises of a distinguished citizennI posed to. A national problem the school. State that public school strikes me as simply people "I said, 'Yes'; and then I somewhere needing help. What asked, 'Are you the president "...children, whose becausetin waSthereWellwasPrOvid{"'a la a people? Where? What kind of of the graduating class?' He parents who wanted perhaps it was in th help?... The national farm prob- said, 'No, I am principal, of the them to wor,]ff, ad Constilaonitm,- p lem? What about Ed Doyle up school,' of going to School, that every child shout6 there on Pine Mountain? The 'I said, 'How old are you?' full school year -- an 4 t bank? Well, what sort of trou- He said, 'Nineteen years.' could stay away from attendance for each ' ble does Uncle Henry "I said, 'Have you been to school with complete year through all the y Kimbrough have with his Little college?' He answered, 'I had grade school and into ! bank over there in Chipley?" my freshman year at the immunity..." schools was compulso One of Roosevelt's favorite -University of Georgia.' were teaching under him were "But I soon discove tales about what he learned in "I said, 'Do you figure on gettingless than three hundred as I might have known Georgia encounters had to do going through and getting a dollars a year. I said to myself, should -- that school with education. He told it many degree?' He said, 'Yes, sir, I will 'Why do they have to pay that school in the rural distr times in public and private, for be teaching school every other low scale of wages? ... I began was open only four mo$ simple as well as sophisticat- year and going to college every realizing that the community five months a year -- a ed listeners, varying it a little other year on the proceeds.' did not have any purchasing too small to hold all tM but not much. This is a 1937 "I said, 'How much are they power..." dren that wanted to go t version, from a dedication paying you?' And the principal NOW, OBVIOUSLY could not employ e speech for a black school in of that school said, 'They are Roosevelt could have learned teachers -- or that chi Warm Springs. very generous; they are pay- about the sad state of educa- whose parents who W "IT WAS WAY back in 1924 ing me three hundred dollars tional facilities and the lack of them to work instead of [his first visit] that I began to a year.' purchasing power in the rural to school, could stay awa learn economics at Warm "Well, that started me think- South in other ways. But such school with complete ira Springs. Here is how it hap- ing. Three hundred dollars for firsthand experiences were ty..." pened: One day while I was sit- the principal of the school. That probably better learning expe- (Next week: The birtl ting on the porch of the little means the three ladies who riences. For that matter, he of REA) January 30, 1983 when 103,667 ml, i i i paid to watch Joe Gibbs e Washington Redskins defeat DonShula'sMlamiDolphins,27- You Gotta Drawer the Line Somewh 17, in Super Bowl XVII. On January 9, 1977, 103,438 paid to see Bud Grants A report by Knight-Ridder Soldier came to $1,452.10 WOULD BE to try and f. Minnesota Vikings lose to John newspapers said it's costing There were a few things in war while wearing dt Madden's Oakland Raiders, 32- 14 in the second largest crowd $750 million a day to operate the graphic I had to question, drawers. at a Super Bowl. It was also Operation Desert Storm. One is, why does a canteen You can't just stop played in Pasadena. Of course, the U.S., which cover ($8.95) cost more than desert, pull down your dl Sunday night at 6 p.m., the stands for Ultimate Sugar the canteen itself ($,5.45)? trousers ($14.40), and p NTC Champions, St.Louis Rams Daddy, is paying for most of it. And if we issue a soldier a your droopy drawers. will face the AFC Champions, It is difficult for me to deal belt ($6.60), why does he also I couldn't locate a mi Tennessee Titans in Atlanta in with a notion like $750 million need suspenders ($6.95)? expert, retired or otherwiJ SUPER BOWL XXXIV. a day. Even "$750 million a The thing that concerned speak on this subject. Hope to see you in church- month" is bewildering, me most, however, was what There's nothing were all tied up with th thereis always the second half! I probably could handle we're paying for a soldier's worse than a cheap works. "$750 million a decade," drawers, pair of drawers. Wear But I think it is a darnl shame we don't think en because that's what the aver. Out of the $1,412.10 being them a couple of of our boys on the battlet age baseball player makes spent on the combat outfit, a these days. measly $1.50 is spent on a sol- times and the elastic to give them a proper, I was further confused by dier's underwear, waistband stretches tional pair of drawers. a graphic that accompanied the Knight Ridder article. HAVE YOU PRICED men's and suddenly you're 1T'SSUSTLIKEOUR, It pictured an American drawers lately? Put a "Calvin wearing ... "droopy ERNMENT to go hog-wi male soldier in full combat gear Klein" or "Ralph Lauren" tag drawers." canteen covers and and what each part of that gear onthem andthey cost youtwen- penders, but basically ignC cost. Here're some examples: ty bucks or more. of clothing, commonly known much more important it Nondesigner drawers cost as "droopy drawers." underwear. Desert helmet: $103 anywhere from ten to eighteen Ten times a day they fall I don't know what we Helmet cover: $2.50 bucks, down from the waist to just do here a home unless it's Boots: $33.20 And the ones we've giving north of the knees. You have to If you've got a man iri Socks: $1.65 our soldiers cost only a dollar- go to the men's room, take off desert, send him some ct M-16 rifle: $475 fifty? your pants, and pull up your ers. _, Two-quart canteen: $,5.45 drawers. Even if you can't aft Canteen cover: $8.75 THERE'S NOTHING This causes the loss of valu- Calvins or Ralphs, there Belt: $6.60 WORSE than a cheap pair of able time in the workplace, not many more less expe Suspenders: $6.95 drawers. Wear them a couple to mention considerable irri- fruits of the looms avail of times and the elastic waist- tability, and they won't become dr0 THE TOTAL ESTIMATED band stretches and suddenly Operation Desert Dra COST of outfitting a U.S. you're wearing a most annoy- IMAGINE HOW IT It's time to act. | ,,..,