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Manchester, Georgia
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January 30, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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January 30, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A GrLme. ll.klimlion Millard B. Grime41, PrelJdent MIKE HALE PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN Ktrrr, EnDAI ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOWN BUSINESS I,ff_ANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Is Bush's Patience Wearing Thinner? President Bush has com- mented over and over that his patience is wearing thin. It must be thinner than a sheet of paper by now. Last Thursday, the Bush administration provided its most detailed evidence yet that Iraq still retains illicit weapons of mass destruction and is hiding the evidence. A document has been pre- sented that indicates the United Nations officials have concluded that Iraq has not adequately accounted for more than 2.38 tons of bio- logical agents it formerly possessed, among other chemicals. , If in fact that is the case, then those items should be destroyed. However, we all know what it would be Like to prove they do exist, and if so, where they art hidden. Wile Bush's patience is wearing thin, I think so is the patience of most Americans. Our children go to bed every night with the threat of war looming over their heads like the cold weather we have experienced recent- ly. Every American is won- dering what's going-to hap- pen, when it's going to hap- pen and what the outcome will be. We have seen our econo- my, which was already stressed, continue to slide. The gas of price continues to increase. What about all the fami- lies that have been separat- ed because of this? All the deployments have wives, husbands and children won- dering ff their loved one will come home and if so, when. I'm not talking about just the ones who have been deployed overseas, either. Here in our office, one of our pressmen has been deployed to North Carolina. He has left behind his wife and two sons, ages five and seven• I could go on, but I'm sure everyone gets the message. It's a simple one: sometimes the threat of war can be dev- astating, especially when it lingers as longas this one has. SECRETARY OF STATE Colin Powell says he is con- vinced that even without approval of the United Nations, the United States will have plenty of other countries join in the fight should war break out. I'm not so sure that is the case. Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov says no evidence has been presented that jus- tifieg an attack on Iraq and has urged the United States not to launch a war without international approval. The Bush administration may be right, but it could be wrong. It would be a tragedy for the United States to enter such a war and not have allies fighting it with them. I'm not saying that war might not be justified, I'm simply saying that it is a fight that the United States should not have to fight alone. THE SAD PART of all of this is that the United States had an opportunity to end this thing once and for all back during the Gulf War. We had already invaded, we had them on their knees and chose not to finish it. Had we finished it then, and shown that we will not tolerate such action, things might have be different "day. The tragedy of September 11 might have even been avoided. That's hypothetical, of course, and I have no way to prove it would or wouldn't. I'm sim- ply saying that had we shown we mefint business all those years ago, terrorists and countries like Iraq would probably view us much dif- ferently today, and honestly be afraid of the conse- quences. I remember during the Gulf War how America gave to the people of Iraq. We sent food and supplies to them. We all knew the people of Iraq were not our enemies, only that crazed maniac that we allowed to walk away with- out even a paper cut• We showed that we were sympathetic and a caring nation and what did it get us? The same people who were eating our food was alsoburn- ing our flag. I PERSONALLY think it's time for the United States to stop fighting the wars of the world. We need to take care of our own. If we go to war because our nation is at risk, or because of an incident like September 11, then I'm all for it. I agree that allowing a country with a crazy man in leadership, like Iraq, deserves it, but what price are the American people sup- posed to pay when the world doesr't want to B get involved? THE HOGANSVILt,E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company• a division of Grimes Publications• at 3051 R(wsevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere• Prices include all les taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR SUBSCRIPTIOP¢ call (706) 846-3188 t)r write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications• P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. Pos"ruts-n,a: Send ',address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .............................................. 'at .............. Mike Hale As,,x:iate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldstcm Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Karen Grant Composing .................................................................. Valinda lvery. Dewayne FIowet Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager. .................................................................................... Judy Crews Production Manager ................... ; ........................................................ Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom ........................................... Darnell McCauley. Joey Knight. Larry Colleges CORPORATE OFFICERS President ............................................................................................. Millard B+ Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ............................ .'. .......... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer .................................... ................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counl and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JAN. 30, 2003 Having a IS-Year Class Reunioira00t00: , prVice Written in 1978 head librarian. CA smudge on We'll listen to the *de A. The fellow who was pres- ident of my high school sen- ior class called the other day to ask a favor. He wants me to write something witty and clever to be used as an invi- tation to our 1S-year class reunion next summer. We never had a 10-year reunion, which was probably just as well with me. The prin- cipal's office statute of limi- tations probably doesn't run out in 10 years. They might still have had something on me. Like there was the book I never got around to return- ing to the school library. The posse didn't come back until around the early 70s. Our librarian was also the princi- pal's wife, and she ran the library with an iron hand. Nuclear power plants are maintained with less regi- mentation. I WAS remembering some of the library rules at my high school: --Thou shalt not touch a book unless your hands have been scrubbed clean and thoroughly inspected by the a book is an insult to litera- ture.") -- Thou shalt not wear wristwatches or bracelets into the library because a wristwatch or bracelet could make a scratch on one of the library tables, God forbid. (I am convinced anybody caught scratching a library table at my high school would have been dragged out behind the auditorium and shot, not to mention having his or her library privileges taken away. --Thou shalt not talk while in the library, nor gig- gle, nor grunt nor pull a chair from under a table so as to make the noise a chair being pulled frdm under a table will inevitably make. Irregardless -- which isn't a word but was used a hundred times a day by one of the coaches -- I still look back on my high school years with favor. I was on the baseball team and the basketball team, and I was in the Key Club and I had a steady girlfriend, which is another reason I wasn't par- ticularly disturbed when we had no 10-year reunion. The last time I saw my steady girlfriend, who later became much more than that, she was loading our living room furniture, my stereo, the bed and the washer and dryer into the back of a truck. Who knows what she might still have been in the market for? FRANKLY, I am puzzled as to what to write witty and clever for the invitation. I can say we'll all drink a few beers, likely, and we won't have to hide behind Robert's and Alf's drive-in to doit. We'll take a look at one another and say thihgs like, "You haven't changed a bit" when what we really mean is "I wouldn't have known you in a million years because the last time I saw you, you had hair. tl songs and tell a lie or two.i Reve And maybe for old tired in Mc sake I'll even have a da with my steady girlfridVIr. W • who later became much mS resi than that while someboansvi sings"In the Still of the Nighs in E treh in COME TO THINK of! 15 years later is a perfect turvi to have a high school reuni daugl It's short enough period , Bill the good memories to be frder, Ca and the ravages of age to hr-in-l taken only a soft toll. ece, I And long enough to h Hunt forgiven an overdue librdrhe ( book, a punch in the belly ansvi even the night I walked i# an empty house and found  for the first time adultha isn't all it was cracked up! be. No BY SPECIAL ARRANGEM WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, THE H0 NEWS IS CARRYING SELECI COLUMNS BY THE LATE L GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NS. BY MORELAND, AND BECAME MOST WIDELY READ GEOR WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZA BOOKS AND TAPE.S ARE STILL AVJ ABLEFOR SALE THROUGH BADI PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191J ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BooK AND MUSIC STORES NATII WIDE. tic ta na t l at. F tn OU La t is a[ 3€  r.  i of the ,n. He lerabe Can There Ever Be a Lasting Peace00s0000 A good while ago, while the early morning news was on, the anchor of CNN's Headline News was giving the headlines of the latest overnight happenings. During the telecast, the lat- est innovation in newscasting was streaming across the bot- tom of the screen. While the anchor was speaking, a con- tinuous line of news ran across the bottom of the scan. On,'Of those lines gav, e a statement by Secretary of State Colin Powell in regards to the recent and escalating vio- lence in Israel an_d Palestine. The statement said some- thing to the effect that he hoped the latest events would be the beginning of the end to the violence in the Middle East. Along with the reports of our military operations in Afghanistan and the buildup of troops in relation to Iraq, the news media has found much to report on the fight- ing between Israel and Palestine. We have seen pic- tures and heard reports of the bloodshed in Israel, and like Colin Powell, most of the world hopes that with each breaking story that will indeed be the beginning of the end to the violence. There have been many schooled and experienced individuals who have tried to settle the dis- putes that so often arise in that part of the world. We want to see the fighting end, but will it ever? I will be the first to admit that I am no diplomat at settling disputes, nor am I an expert O foreign affairs. HoWever, I believe i have the answer to the Middle East peace question. Yes, there can be and yes, there will be lasting peace in the Middle East. Before you throw me off as a Miss Cleo disciple, my answer is not from my own future visions or some prophetical wisdom. The source of my information is not unnamed, restricted or of any private nature. The source of my information and the basis for my statement is found in the Bible. The Bible has much to say about the fate and future of Israel. It is good Bible tells us in Matthew 5, "Blessed are the peacemak- ers•" We may be able to cur- tail and promote periods of peac m that r $oa=!mt onkv one, will be ab'l et> establish a lasImg peace and"put the fighting to an ultimate end. The one is the Prince of Peace, the Lord Jesus Christ. It will take more than armies, treaties, and promis- es to finally bring peace to the Middle East. War has been waging there since Bible times and no human govern- ment can finally stop it. It will not be until Jesus himself comes again, sets up his king- dom, and rules from Jerusalem on the throne of David that this world will ever see lasting peace in the Middle East. The Bible says that we as Americans send envoys to the Middle East to try to stop the violence. The _ebr,e brc rebel against his autholeWilli. Yes, peace is possible, I Car++ only Jesus can bring pea nepll Likewise, many readTh e ( today could probably C.%ansx tbr- - less if there is peace in , " Middle East, you would like peace in your heart. wonder ff you can ever rience a lasting sense of and contentment The is again a resounding yes' one man has stated, is not in th:absnce of tff ble, but in t ps/fie o' +"°' Savior." Just as there will+,+ A ! no lasting peace in the Mi " " East until Jesus comes, tM can be no lasting peace inI10" hearts of men until Je comes into their hearts. I  t not saying there will be  "-" more troubles in your life, I am saying there will I I lasting calm in the midst the storm. Today, if you 1 that deep sense 0f abiding and peace that you so m long for, bow your head, r ize your need of a Savi+ repent of sin, believe Je died, was buried, rose ag  put your trust in him for S + I that Jesus will rule with a rod . vation, ask him to save y of iron and will break in andbelieve that he will. Je pieces all those that would is truly the Prince of Pea( / l[ _** 5o IL Ago... 00th, In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor to the Hogansville Home Ne Comrm • BIG EVENT: "Natural gas was o cially turned into The City of Hogansvi distribution system at 11 a.m. on TuesdaP, Jan. 27th (1953.) The ceremony place at the City Odorizing Station adj cent to the Southern Natural G 70(  Company sub-station about 2 miles fr the city on Lone Oak Road." . I • BIGGER SCHOOL: Bids for t . construction of the 13-room addition  / 9 the Hogansville High School are bei I sought by the Hogansv e City Board  Education. The building, which will co prise 16,000 square feet in area, Wf {04 include classrooms, a large library, coc+ ing and sewing rooms for ics." *MOTHERS'MARCH: "The March on Polio will l on Thursday, Jan. 29. Approximately ladies will begin a of Hogansville. The siren at the city will be used to remind everyone hour has come to turn on' if you care to make a contribution to tff March of Dimes." • MINISTER MISHAP: "Dr. Willis Howard were on their way Carabele, Fla. for a short vacation they had a slight tangle with another cle."