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Manchester, Georgia
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January 31, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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January 31, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS MI HA PUB LISltEPJADvTRTIS ING DmEOrOR JOHN KtYVKALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISIt}3_)rIR ROB RICHARDSON ASSL''TANvr EDITOR JAa GorY'toN B UStNF,'kg MANAGER Phone (706) 846-,3188. Fax t706) 846-2,.'@6 O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 302.) Locks Are Still For Honest Folk What makes people see an opportunity and seize it, even if they know it's wrong and they shouldn do it? That's a million dollar que tim,., that men with inch more wisdom that I, have been try- ing to figure out for years. Prisons are full of people who did not intend to commit a crime, but did so on the spur of a moment becausetheoppor- tunity presented itself. Case in point, two Callaway High buses were ransacked and personal items belonging to students were taken during a basketball game recently at Manchester High School. There is no doubt the decision to do this was made on the spur of a moment. If it had been thought through, the subjects would have probably realized that teenagers are not going to leave any really valuable items in gym bags on a parked bus that is not being watched. However, the person or per- sons that stole the items did make off with a few electron- ic items, some clothing and a few other personal items belonging to the students. For what? Are they going to sell the items and make a ton of money? No. However, if they are caught, theyql go to jag and probably for a good little while. Which means, the few dollars were certainly not worth the jail time. For those whohadtheir per- sonal items taken, it is a hum- bling experience to say the least. You feel as though you have been persovy violated when someone does this. You don't want a stranger going through your personal things, and the last thing you want is to have someone you consider to be of some value taken from yotL It will be a good while be fore these students will leave anything unattended again. THIS INCIDENT is only the tip of the irg as far as theft crimes  today. Near Pine Mountain recently, a man stopped at a stop'#gn and a man jumped from+a vehicle behind him, pulled agun and robbed him. Things like this are fairly common today. In big cities it's almost a common practice for some robbers to bump the back of a person's car and when they exit the vehi- cle to investigate the damage, the robber will draw a gun on them and take their money and other valuables such as jewel- ry. , I guess what I'm trying to say is that in today's society, criminal activity has become as common place as our daily tripstoand from work We hear about it, we hate that it hap- pened, but we accept it and go on. As I was pondering this, I begin to think about the way life was in Harris, Meriwether, Talbot and Troup counties when I was growing up. I real- ly started thinking about how much things have changed. WHEN IWAS a smaU child growing up in Harris County, we seldom locked the doors to our home. People were simply more trustworthy back then. We were not afraid that some- one would eat er our home while we slept to rob and kill us. I think one reason for that was the discipline that we received as children. In those days, if I was at the next door neighbors and did something wrong, the neighbor would spank me and when I got home, I would receive another spanking. Now, before you go think- ing I'm about to say we should whip our children more, that is not my intent. I'm just say- ing that when I was a boy, that is usually the way it happened. Although I will admit, the fear of those whippings my Dad could dish out kept me out of trouble alot. I would rather'oe good" than have to face his "razor strap." Actually, what I'm saying is that when I was growing up, we either didn have as much crime or we simply didn hear about it as muckL Some say it's'because we didn have as high a popula- tion hack therL Others say we areamore violent society today than we were back then. I'm not sure what the true cause is. However, I doknowtherea- son crimes such as this do hap- pen. It's about money, and usu- ally money to purchase drugs. To tell the truth, I don't think there is a way to stop such things from happening, I do believe we can take precau- tions to prevent it from hap- pening so ofterL However, it is also impor- tant to remember that while locks will keep honest folks out, they are not exactly a strong deterrent for true criminals. A criminal is going to find a way to take what he or she wants. That's just the facts of life. HOGANSVILLE HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publicati at Y051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Gexgia 30230. FOR suBScrtos call (706) 846-3188 or VTite to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Mam'hester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASR: Send addre, changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230. STArt" Publisher and Advegising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... Jobn Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston" Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWdters .......... : ............................................................... Bryan Gemr, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ....................................................................................... Linda I.ester Composing ................................................................................................ Valinda [very Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Gotdston Pressman .................................................................................. : ....... Wayne Grochowski Pressroom .......................................................................... David Boggs, Lan'y Colleges President ............................................................................................. Millaxd B. Grimes Vice PresidenL ....................... ; ......................................................... Charlotte S. Secretary .......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOME NEWS - JAN. 31, 2002 That OldHigh School Letter (Written in 1987) I found my old high school letter jacket the other day. I was looking for some- thing else in the back of a clos- et at my mother's house and came upon it--blue with off- white leather sleeves and a block N sewn on the front. I had forgotten it even existed. I suppose that twen- ty-four years ago when I graduated from high school, I simply cast it aside as I leaped into the more materi- al collegiate world. "I put it up for you and kept it," my mother said, "in case you ever wanted it again." I played basketball and baseball at Newnan High School. I lettered in both sports, which is how I got the jacket in the first place. My number, 12, is stitched on one of the sleeves. The face of a tiger--our mascot'is on the other. Enough years have passed now that I probably could lie about my high school athletic career and get away with most of it. I know guys who barely made the varsity who've man- aged to move up to all state status with the passing of enough years. But I'll be honest. I was an average athlete, if that. I averaged maybe 10 points a game in basketball, and shot the thing on every opportu- nity that came to me. "Grizzard is the only per- son who never had a single assist in his entire basketball career," an ex-teammate was telling someone in my pres- ence. "That's because he never passed the ball." I hit more than .300 my senior year in baseball, but they were all in bloop singles except for one of those bloop singles that rolled in some high weeds in right field. By the time the ball was found, I was around the bases for the winning run. "Why don't you take it home with you?" my mother suggested after I had pulled the jacket out of the closet. "Maybe you'll have some children one day, and they might like to see it." I reminded my mother I was 41 and down three mar- riages, and the future didn't look that bright for offspring. But I suppose a mother can dream. I did bring the jacket home with me. Alone, up in my bedroom, in front of a mirror, I pulled it over me for the first time in a long time. A lot of names came back with the jacket. Clay, John, Buddy, Russell, Richard, Al. And Dudley the Hound, who's still looking for his first base hit since he was IS. And then there was Wingo, of course, the best high school shortstop I ever saw until a ground ball hit a pebble one day and bounced up and broke his jaw. Ever hear that haunting song "Where Are the Men I Used to Sport With?" They've all got kids, I guess, and their mothers are happy. It's funny about my jack- et. It still fit well on my arms and shoulders, but I couldn't get it to button anymore. I guess some shrinkage can be expected after all those years of neglect closet. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD, GREW UP IN MORELAND, AND THE MOST WIDELY GEORGIA WRITER OF TIME. GRIZZARD ] TO ALL AMERICA PARTICULARLY TO THIS AREA OF WHICH HE OFTEN, AND WHERE A TION OF 1-85 FROM TO HOGANSVILLE IN HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD IN 1996, AND A WRITING EDITING LAB IS BEING ! ICATED TO HIS BELOVED OF AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 191266, ATLANTA, GA 1266 AND AT Spending Our 'Dash' Through Lff My number two grand- daughter reminded me the other day that she would be 16 years old in just over two months. That will be a big day for her because she will be eligible for those long await- ed driver's license and any other benefits a sixteen year old might have coming her way. Those comments made my mind wander back to the days of my youth, and you know what, I couldn't wait until my 16thbirthday so that I could single handedly get behind the wheel of that auto- mobile. It seemed that big occasion would never arrive. Then, after celebrating that big day, my thoughts turned to the next big day, completing as much educa- tion as possible and getting out into the world on my own. After that came the chal- lenges of business, married life, raising a family, buying a home and so own. Seems it was just one big day and one big goal after another as life ticked away. Folks would tell me to enjoy th0se years because the older one gets the faster they pass by. I didn't pay much attention to that advice until a few years ago and then I ,realized how right they were. Life does move by so quick- ly, and when it does, we begin to look back over those years to see if we have accom- plished any of the really important things. Thefollowing article appeared in "Good Stuff" magazine. The author is unknown, but it pretty well makes the point I am trying to make today.  The title is 'q'he Dash." "I read of a man who stood to speak At the funeral of a friencL He referred to the dates on her tombstone From the beginning to the end. He noted that first came her date of birth And spoke the following date with tears, But he said what mat- tered most of all Was the dash between those years: 1934-2000. For that dash represents all the time That she spent alive on earth... And now only those who loved her Know what that little line is worth` For it matters not how much we The cars...the house...the older one gets the faster they pass by." If we could just slow t enough To consider what's and real, And always try to stand The way other people_est Aud be less quick to a- ++ And show appreci, . ] ,+ , f..a00 And love the people lng lives , ,:;J+l Like we ve never  before. 1 If we treat each other d  "Folks would tell respect, ej enj:oy those And more often we00e00a a. me to .... years because the Remembering that ee special dash cash, What matters is how we live and love And how we spend our dash. + So think about this long andhard... Arethere any things you'd like to change? For you never know how much is left, That can still be rearranged. Might only last a wh So when your euh being read With your. life's actio rehash Would you be proud things they say About how you spent dash?" H angi nd c 'ete ) pr rese anie No doubt it is to provide for your leave things better than you found them; but it's important to show tion and love for the in our lives. Goc that we spend "our way. Winning the Battle for the In our modern day America, there is a battle rag- ing, that if lost, will change our nation in a way that we do not want to see. The bat- tle referred to is the battle for the family. There are those who identify it as the traditional family while still others refer to it as old fash- ioned. The best term to describe the family that is under attack is the biblical family. As we look around, the family that is described in the Bible is being attacked with all kinds of hellish missiles. For those families who are scripturally put together, Satan has launched the mis- sile of divorce. For those who have yet to begin their own family we can see the missile of deviation. In order to keep us from formAng biblically based faro- flies, Satan tries to entice folks to deviate from the Word of God. One way people deviate from the Bible, is living together out of wedlock. God established the family by the marriage union and it is only in that union there can be a right and proper family. Still another way Satan has drawn people away from the bibli- cal concept of marriage is the homosexual relationship. God created a man and a woman to form the family. Before someone labels me a homophobe or a hatemonger, let me go on record by say- ing this. Jnst because a man stande against sin, whether it be the sin of homosexuality, adul- tery, gambling or whatever, it doesn mean that that man has hatred in his heart for the person involved. Although there are some with such atti- tudes, there are those who truly care for the people involved in those Satan per- petrated lies. It is true you can hate the sin and love the person. If one would closely examine the Bible, this fact can easily be seen. John 3:16 says, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten son, that whosoev- er believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Romans 5:8 says, "But God commendeth his love toward us in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." The point is there is a battle for the family. AS we look around and see all the violence of children "One way peop00 deviate from the Bible, is living together out of wed- /ock." and young people, there are those who wonder why and what can be done. It is my op'mion that the violence and delinquency of these young people is nothing more than a symptom revealing the breakdown of the biblically founded family. May this pastor submit that ff weare to see a cease fire among our nation's young people, the fight for the ilymust be won. The: to win this battle strengthen the families are already established As Father's approaches, may there revival of manhood. placed man as the lea the home and in the battl the family, the husband take his rightful place. The husband is to b e ing, living leaderof his l He is to take the respor ity to see that hi famf properly taken care of, a rially as well as spirit0 As a result of the father hag his responsibility, the ond way to win the batO the family wig automa ly come into play. It is the responsibil the parents, especiall fathers, to see to it the.ir dren are educated i truths of the Bible. I thank God for d wonderful families that up this beautiful little t  But these familie,, attack and today may fathers stand up to lenge and fight for wives and children, the future we can nation turn back to