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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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February 3, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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February 3, 2000
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A Grimes Publk:ation MIllrd B. Gdrrms, Preldde usPs e20.040 Mn HA PUBLISADvrLSG DmF_LR JOHN KLK)aL AssoclAaX PUBUSH/FrrOR BRYAN GE'IXR ASSOCIATE EDrrOR JAYNE GOWN BuslNKsS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 * Ocial Legal Organ, City of Hogtmsvil!e Groundhog Day Every year on February 2, : Americans observe . "Groundhog Day." Most of our concerns about this day is whether the ground- -. hog saw his shadow or not. : : For ff he did, he will go back : ; inside his burrow and the weath- !i ; er will be wintry for six more : weeks. If he doesn't see his shad- ow, he will remain outside and spring is right around the cor- ner. In "1723, the Delaware Indians settled Punxsutawney,  Pennsylvania as a campsite ' halfway between the Allegheny and Susquehanna Rivers. The town is 90 miles north- east of Pittsburgh at the inter- : section of Route 36 and Route 119. The Delaware Indians con- ,sidered groundhogs honorable !ancestors. According to the original ::creation beliefs of the Delaware :Indians, their forebears began ilife as animals in "Mother iEarth" and emerged centuries later to hunt and live as men. When German settlers arrived in the 1700's, they brought a tradition known as Candlemas Day, which has an :early origin in the Imgan cele- !bration of ]bolic. ...... It came at the mid-point ibetween the Winter Solstice and i!the Spring Equinox. Superstition held that ff the iweather was fair, the second half of winter would be stormy !and cold. For the early Christians in Europe, it was the custom on Candlemas Day for clergy to bless candles and distribute them to the people in the dark iof Winter. A lighted candle was placed in each window of the home. The :day's weather continued to be :important. If the sun came out February "2, halfway between Winter and Spring, it meant six more weeks of wintry weather. : If the sun made an appear- :ance on Candlemas Day, an ani- mal would cast a shadow, thus predicting six more weeks of i :Winter. Germans watched the badger. i i InPennsylvania, theground- hog was selected as the replace- ment. :: They determined the  igroundhog to be the most intel- i igent and sensible animal and therefore decided ff the sun did appear on February 2, so wise an animal as the groundhog would see its shadow and hurry back into its underground home for another six Weeks of winter. Pennsylvania' s official cel- ebration of Groundhog Day began on February 2, 1886 with a proclamation in the "The Delaware Indians considered groundhogs honorable ancestors." Punxsutawney Spirit, by the newspaper's editor, Clyner Freas: "Today is groundhog day and up to the time of going tO press the beast has not seen its shadow." The groundhog was given the name "Punxsutawny Phil" and his hometown is called '%Veather Capital O f the World." The legendary first trip to Gobbler's Knob was made the following year. Since the movie "Groundhog Day" was release in 1993, more than 35,000 visitors come to Punxsutawney. The groundhog, also known as a woodchuck, is a member of the squirrel family. They eat :sucmdent green plants such as dandelion, clover and grasses. According to handler Bill Deeley, a local funeral direc- tor, Phil weighs 15 pounds and thrives on dog food and ice cream in his climate-controlled home at the Punxsutawney Library. Up on Gobblers's Knob, Phil is placed in a heated burrow underneath a simulated tree stump on stage before being pulled out at 7:25 a.m. to make his prediction. Phil's Winter prognostica- tions for the past 113 years has been somewhat low, being cor- rect only 39 percent of the time. He has seen his shadow 89 times and seen no shadow 14 times. Nine times in the 1890's no records were kept. Punxsutawney Phil is grow- hag in fame. In 1981, he wore a yellow ribbon in honor of the American hostages in Iran.In 1987 he met Pennsylvania gov- ernor Dick Thornburg, the same year he met with President Ronald Reagan in the Oval Office. In 1993, Columbia Pictures released the movie Groundhog Day starring Bill Murray. Phil appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show in 1995. Since 1995, record crowds exceeding 30,000 have visited, Gobbler's Knob in Ptmxsutawney. I think Phil came out last week and saw his shadow according to the cold wintry weather we are having! THE HOeANSVILLE Hom NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. US PS 6204340. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR SUBSCRIPTIONS call (706) 846=3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POS-rMASrl: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAW Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Business Manager. ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldslon Staff Writers .........................  Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Strider Composing ............................................................................. Valinda lvery,  Smith l,egals .............................................. ; .................................................................. Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ........................................................................................ .Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................ David Boggs and Wayne Groehowski Coma Orncs President ............................................................. : ..................................... aMillard B. Vice President ........................................... . ............................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................. . ............................................... Kathy Grimes Garretl Legal Counsel and Assistant Secreany .................................................... James S. Grimes , , ,, , OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - FEBRUARY 3, 2000 "Never Again By The Flood" Well now, I was just think- ing about first one thing and then another. I feel something should be said about the great Snow-In. You recall it started Thursday morning. Now Thursday is the day the Hogansvile Herald comes out so, of course, I had to go to the post office to see if "Allan Sez" was still up to his nonsense. While there, I went into the "Bear" for a few things and found to my surprise so had most of Hogansville. The line I was in reached all the way from where the tic-tac man starts until where he ends. To show you how long I waited, the tic-tac man passed me three times, ticing and tacing and laughing as if his heart was overflowing. NOW I WILL MAKE an admission; a man my age does- n't stand in aline very long with- out feeling a strange urge to wiggle, stand first on one foot and then another and his eyes take on a glazed and pained expression Some remarked on why did I wiggle and change legs and look glazed. My answer was that it was a return of the Saint Vitas dance that has been in the family for 800 years. They shook their heads in sympathy. I FINALLY reached a checkout counter and headed home with the bird seed. The most beautiful part of the snow, I thought, was the coming of the birds. We had hundreds in our yard and they all ate well. You know, I think birds are like flowers with wings. They can fly to be seen by all, and I thank God He gave us flying flowers. But the old mill still runs on. MOST OF US HEARD the "State of the Union" message the other night. I reallythought it was a good speech, delivered well, but what did he say? Reagonomics is working fine and aU we have to do is wait fifteen or twenty years and everything will be just lovely. I wonder if there are some who can't wait that long ONE ISSUE he didn't men- tion was "junk mail". You know "The most beautiful part of the snow, I thought, was the com- ing of the birds. We had hundreds in our yard and they all ate well. You know, I think birds are like flowers with wings. They can fly to be seen by all, and I thank God He gave us flying flow- ers." so called "junk mail" adds greatly to "stuff". Some throw it away at the post office, some take it home and put it in the trash, some take it homand read it and some even answer some. Junk mail is a lem. In some homes adds to "stuff" time, take over the THE FIRST TI c came old Noah built| a: keep his feet dry. that this time we will[J_ t in junk mail and "stn' can just see ,ul r around one day andi ' will say, "Let's us g Mr. and Mrs. Lain, I uI they have a flag s!l: where they live" I" ,,. dl( i reply, rme an air how will we get out till" the junk mail and stUi replies, quick as a cat, crawl through the hoUr yesterday and the t make it for I left fl Mountville Road." We go and find I house but we can't ge' their hole, so we ha visit yelling through they have made. YES, JUNK MAIL will inherit the earth./ did not say, believe me, it will happen. REA Born in Warm SpringS00momo00;o0000:a;e00:t00t:Cotta 1 You can be sure that He said that one of the most Roosevelt discovered a lot successful New Deal innova- about Georgia in trips around tions, the Rural Electrification power, providing Oti the area in his hand-operated Administration, was a Georgia built his own transmis autos. It is not farfetched to baby, born in a cottage in Warm Moore did it at Ro speculatethathe"learned"over Springs. expense, of course. steak at Jim Peters's that all "Fourteen years ago," he $351.32. Almost. all t Georgia children went to school told a Georgia audience at the came for 18 poles at $ a full term -- then learned in dedication of the Lamar County and two miles of coppe the hard clay front yard of a Electric Membership $140.30. farm shack that they didn't. Corporation in 1938, "a Most farmers in He learned from firsthand Democratic Yankee came to a "...one of the most the rest of the South experiences in New York, of neighboring county in your SuccessfuZ,New, D,al where would have be eourse. Therewerebar|_kail- stateinsearchqfapoolofwarm ..... dened by the expens t ures in New York when he was waters wherein he might  innovations, the Rural least some of them' Governor, which he had to deal his way back to health... His new E l e c t r if i c a t i o n it. The cost for poles a was much higher whe$ with firsthand. Some rural neighbors extended to him the Administration, was a from private utilities. schools in his native state were hand of genuine hospitality... also underfunded and provided "There was only one diseor- Georgia baby, born in Roosevelt explain poor education. This came to dant note in that first stay of a cottage m Warm how rural property own his attention when he was a state - mine at Warm Springs; when SpFtns." time in New York, senator, the first of the month bills came described a new eotta$ On anotherissue, rnralelec- in for electric light at my little E 1 e c t r i f i c a t i o n built in Dutchess Coun trification and public power, cottage, I found that the charge Administration." strip and creosote an "d Roosevelt undoubtedly learned was 18 cents per kilowatt hour ROOSEVELT ESTAB- pole" for $10, but how a plenty from his New Yorkexpo- -- about four times as much as LISHED the REA by executive pole bought from the rience. He had a lengthy, bitter I paid in New York. That start- order in 1935. It was permanent company would cost $4 fight over hydroelectric power ed my long study of proper util- by statute the following year. It is the whole basis of t while Governor. He lost it, but ity charges for electricity and provided transmission systems thing. The REA is bei the utility companies' victory the whole subject of getting for electric power to communi- in large part, of coursa convinced Roosevelt that the electricity into farm homes ties that private companies farmers themselves in way to get cheap power to the throughout the United States. would not serve -- or would erative way." people, particularly in sparse- So it can be said that a little cot- serve only at prohibitive cost. ly populated rural areas, was tage at Warm Springs, Georgia, By 1934, Roosevelt's (Next week: Gettin with federal, rather than just was the birthplace of the Rural Georgia farm had been electri- to Warm Springs) Pulling the Wool 01 ,er My Eyes I found my old high school letter jacket the other day. I was looking for something else in the back of a closet at my mother's house and came upon it -- blue and off-white leather sleeves and a block N sewn on the front I had forgotten it even existed. I suppose that twen- ty-four years ago when I grad- uated from high school, I sim- ply cast it aside as I leaped into the more material colle- giate world. "I put it up for you and kept it," my mother said, "in case you ever wanted it again." I PLAYED BAbIKETBALI and baseball at Newnan High School. I lettered in both sports, which is how I got the jacket in the first place. My number, 12, is stitched on one of the sleeves. The face of a tiger  our mascot  is on the other. Enough years have passed now that I probably could lie about my high school athlet- ic career and get away with most of it. I know guys who barely made the varsity who've man- aged to move up to all-state status with the passing of enough years. But I'll be honest. I was an average tthlete, if that. I averaged maybe ten points a game in basketball, and shot the thing on every opportuni- ty that came to me. "Grizzard is the only per- son who never had a single assist in his entire basketball career," an ex-teammate was telling someone in my pres- ence. "That's because he never passed the ball." I HIT OVER .300 my senior year in baseball, but they were all bloop singles except for one of those bloop- ers that rolled in some high weeds in right field. By the time the ball was found, I was around the bases for the win- nmg run. "Why don't you take it home with you? My mother suggested after I had pulled the jacket out of the closet. "Maybe you'll have some chil- dren one day and they might like to see it." I reminded my mother I was forty-one and down three marriages, and the future did- n't look that bright for off- spring. But I suppose a moth- er can dream. I did bring the jacket home with me. Alone, up in my bed- room, in front of a mirror, I pulled it over me for the first time in a long time. A LOT OF NAMES came back with the jacket. Clay, "I was an average athlete, if that. I aver- aged maybe ten points a game in bas- ketball, and shot the thing on every oppor- tunity that came to rrt e . " John, Buddy, Russell, Richard, A1. And Dudley and the Hound, who's still looking for his first base hit si was fifteen. And then there was of course, the best high shortstop I ever saw ground ball hit a pebl day and bounced up am his jaw. EVER HEAR THAI ing song "Where Are t] I used to Sport With?" They've all got ] guess, and their moth happy. It's funny about m et. It still fit well on m and shoulders, but I c get it to button anymo I guess some shr can be expected af those years of neglec closet. i ........