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Manchester, Georgia
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February 6, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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February 6, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - FEB. 6, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 ., mne lh$lk'atmu Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE HAIZ PUBLISHER]/LDVERTISING DIRFJ2TOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR RoB RmHAmSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOWN BUSINE&S MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Pax (706) 846-2206 E O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia :=230 When the Past Meets the Future I'm sure by now, if you read my column each week, you know there are two hobbies that I really enjoy. The first being sports of course, but most people don't know that I've always loved music. Growing up, my family was very musical. My Dad played the guitar and sang, and believe it or not, even someUmes made a good living do it. At about the age of seven I decided I want to play drums. My dad bought me a set and I learned to play. He would never pay for les- sons. "If you really want to learn to play them, you'll teach your- self he said." I did. In my teens, I became involved with gospel music. I learned that I really loved it and always wanted to be involved in it. Eventually, my love for music landed me job with a group. I went on the road a few times and then realized, it was not what I thought it would be. To make a long story short, I eventually decided that I no longer wanted to be involved in music for any other reasons than the fact that I enjoyed it and wanted to use the talent that the good Lord had given me for his use. My family and I got back into the gospel circuit and for a few years, we really had a good time doing it, but eventu- ally life began to take a toll on the group my sisters children got older, and we finally just decided to part with music all together. About the only time I would sing, was a solo or two at church occasionally. Then a few years ago, due to a health problem, I had to stop that and I decided then that I would just forget music and move orL RECENTLY, there has been kind of a push and an urge to get back into music. Many people that used to enjoy my music have asked me why I'm not doing it. Then, there also seems to be a little tugatmy heartstrings from the Lord to get back into gospel music. I'm not sure of all the rea- sons, but the desire to do so is alive once again. I've told myself how diffi- cult it is going to be, and I real- ize how much work it will take. You see, singingis just like play- ing sports and other things, if you don't stay in practice, you forget certain things and those notes you .nee found easy to reach are very difficult because you haven't forced yourself to do that in a while. The fact that I'm much older and the voice is more ras- tured isn going to make things any easier either. But, in spite of all of that, I'm going to try. IT'S KIND OFFUNNY, but I didn't realize until recently how much I really miss music and how much I really enjoyed it. I don't know why, now of all times, I would feel the need or the desire to return to music, but I know one thing, some of the happiest times, of my life were spent behind those old drums or in front of the mic. As I pondered this, I real- ized somethingvery important. Each of us have something we love, a gift from God that should be used for his glory, not ours. However, we allow life to begin to dictate to us our priorities. While I loved music, it became a low priority due to all the other things that were going on in my life. I'm sure that everyone reading this column has at some point in their live, given up on something they really enjoyed and made them happy only to learn later that it is a part of you, it's what makes you happy and in many ways is a outlet for you. Then, you think, that's not me anymore, but that's not true. What you have been is just as much a part of you as what you do and enjoy today. It's this lit- tle thing that I like to refer to as "the past meeting the future." Everything you've done in your past has helped mold and shape you into the person you are today. It has helped you to grow, develop and learn. So, why should we let the past go, when it's actually a part of the future? Having talked about get- ting back into music enough, and boring you out of your skull, let me get to the. moral of this little story .... Life is too short as it is. We should enjoy life and cherish it. You should do the things that make you happy and help you enjoy life, but above all, do what God would have you to do. So, ff you see me out there in some church singing, you know I'm doing what makes me happy, and what I feel God would like for me to do. So, my advice to each of you is, if you want to be happy in life, do what makes you happy, but more importantly, what makes God happy with you. TIlE H(;ANSVII,LE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roomvelt Highway. Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Tmup. Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Pedodic',d postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FOR StIIISCRIPI1OI call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mcrcmy Publications. P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. P,'TMn,',,'rI: Send aress changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF F'ublisher a Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ Jn Kuykendall Business Manager ..................................................... : ........................... Jayne Goldston Assistant Falitor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriteJ .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Lmrie Lewis Adve,'tising Sales ........................................................................................ Karcn Grant Composing .......................... ? ....................................... Valinda kery, Dewayne Flower Lcgals ....................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Managem: .................................................................................... Judy Crews Pnxluction Manage.r ....... : .................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Gmchowski Ihessnun ........................................... Damell McC'auley, Joey Knight, Lan'y Colleges CORPORATE OIq.'lCl,:lts President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice Presideut .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Gan'ctt Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretu'y ............................................... James S. Grimes t nd Here's One for Bill Written in 1978 Athens -- Winter quarter was a sinus headache that seemed to linger on and on. The glory of fall and football had passed. Springtime on the University of Georgia cam- pus was always brightness and color and cold beer in tall cups and young things from Fitzgerald and Dalton whose mommas would have fainted had they known their babies were parading around in pub- lic dressed like that. And would it all ever return again and save us from January's gloom? There was only a trickle of people about the campus Monday. Joggers ran up Lumpkin Street. Will this gen- eration's legacy be a pair of worn running shoes and a green sweat suit? " The Campus Crusade for Christ is presenting Master of Illusion this week. One of the sorority houses has a banner hanging outside congratulat- ing a sister for being accept- ed to the Harvard Law School. Girls used to go to college to find a husband. But things change. There is even a sign now at the entrance to the athletic department training room in the Georgia Coliseum that reads, "Women are in the training room. Remember to wear your shorts." I was thinking of some names like Rissmiller and Swinford and Ridlehuber as I read that sign. Would they have stood for such encroachment? Women in the training room, indeed. Who can come back here -- even in the depths of the winter doldrums -- and not launch himself into a senti mental journey. Boys become men here. Gangly, chirping girls become sophisticated women. How many of us had that first, heady taste of sin on these grounds? I recall being anxious to leave. I was out of my mind. Bill Johnson loved Georgia. He loved everything about it. We were in the same overloaded boat. We both had school, and we both --by choice -- had work as well. Bill Johnson was employed by an Athens radio station. I worked for an Athens news- paper. How do friendships begin? He was "the voice" of Athens High School sports. I was second on a two-man sports department totem pole. The boss covered the Bulldogs. I had Athens High. My friend Bill Johnson and I were together in a thousand rickety, crowded press boxes in places like Gainesville and Augusta and Hartwell and Elberton. He was good at what he did. Bill Johnson was barely past 20, but there could be no question as to his promise as a sportscaster. His voice was smooth, yet strong. There were those nights after games we would drive back to Athens and fantasize bout our futures. "Do you think," he would ask, 'e'll ever get to the big time?" I reckoned that we would. We promised if one of us made it the other did not, the friendship would last. I never made a more sincere prom- ise. There is something about "Do you think, "he would ask, "We'll ever get to the big time?" those days of dreaming. There are no limits in an ambitious mind. Bill Johnson would be as good and as important as Ed Thilenius someday. And I would be paid to write a story about a ball game for an Atlanta newspa- per. The last time saw Bill Johnson w Is the da he grad- uated from Georgia. We had a few last beers together and said how much we would miss each other. He also had-to leave a young wife in Athens for a short military obliga- tion. But then he would be back and look out, Lindsey Nelson. That was March 1966. Spring quarter was beautiful that year. We wrote back and forth. He was stationed some- where in Texas. Came the autumn and a wonderful Georgia football team. You remember. Kirby Moore, Kent Lawrence, George Patton and Bill Stanfill. p, There was the sedpart,, half comeback at Auburn I gave Vince Dooley his lurclr Southeastern Conferurc title. Undefeated Geniec Tech fell the next wee), h Sanford Stadium. sm Georgia would go on tOtO: Cotton Bowl and belssl Southern Metha-.--.. University.  Somewhere tucked 1 I have Bill Johnson s las ter. He was ill, he said. I the first I knew about it.  C" crazy blood infection. B da.. said don't worry. He saiP ni doctors were thinking o1[ Jam ting him go to Dallas t0 env Georgia in the Cotton B t A week later, d:a? December 7, Bill Jol  . died. He was 23. gich The church up Summemrille, his was him through town to cemetery, the old stopped and covered hearts with their young widow Monday, as I across the campus, bered another promise. I Bill Johnson I him one da ever got a job with a paper. This is that for a friend, a long time BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATE L GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN BY MORELAND, MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL .A PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 SolyeSptr tual, Not Material, Need Someone has made the statement, "People buy things that they don't need, with money they don't have, to please people they don't like." "lly we live in the most materialistic world we have ever seen. Whether it is the "keep up with the Joneses" mentality or just simply try- ing to find satisfaction from possessions, material things are being looked to more and more to fill the needs in the hearts of people. Those who look to mate- rial things quickly find out that those earthly treasures cannot and will not ever fill the void which they have. In their place, material things are all fine, well and good, but to try and use them to fill the empty places in men's heart is an attempt to circumvent the will of God. God created men with specific needs and one of those needs is a spiritual need. The spiritual need of man cannot be filled with physi- cal things. Since the material cannot meet the need of the spiritu- al, are human beings destined to have a void that can never be filled? The answer according to the Word of God is a resound- ing NO. The Bible tells us in Matthew 5:6, "Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled." GOD has promised to meet the spiritual needs of man. God promises that if we seek after righteousness as we hunger and thirst for  [ we will be satisfied. [ r God has never tu anyone away who tl]l sought to be right with "u John 6:37 says, "All thatl Father giveth me shall a to me; and him that cot to me I will in no wise oot." The Bible tells us many are hungering thirsting after satisfae but it also tells us that nO are being filled. The only ones who finding real peace and faction are those who seeking says will fill their need. Over le Top; ' t rl;00 Hogansville Herald ]111 i"7" *SUCCESS: At the regular wee meeting of the Kiwanis Club, Presid ! == George Funderburk announced that1 ,.:i _.. .,_-.' -"'=. ==- !LL i,.  -!,=.-, -.-,- ",..= - 1953 March of Dimes drive had been 0 i LZ"E'E'-',:.@ "-:'.r.7'- '--''"" ..... 7.; ..... ' ..... "'"=:Z,,,,, '*i,  cluded with a total $1,600 having be &dtt  .. :%:.i=,:. , turned in this week." *COUNTY RIVALRY: Hogansville High boys basketball will play the West Point High School teams in Winter Game competitionto held Saturday evening." .RUNAWAY CAR: "Mrs. R.C. of Route 3, Hogansville, was driving car at the intersection of Askew Johnson St. when the brakes gave and caused the automobile to curbing and roll into the yard Collier, 47 Johnson St. The front of Mr. Colliers home was sli agod ." *HIGHEST HONOR: "J.R. HogansvUle ws m-elected the West Gerogiaa Council of America at the annual meeting last eral hundred Scouters in attendance." MILESTONE: "The W.C. were the first family in the benefits of the city's new natural,