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Manchester, Georgia
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February 8, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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February 8, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 62o-o40 A Gflms publ{catton  B. Grim Prmlt MIKE HAI PUBIJSHER/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSff)CIATE PUBLIStIER/EDITOR BRYAN G'l AssoctAaX EorroR JAYNE GOLDS1DN Bus MANAGER Phone (706) 8463188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O, Box 426 H411e, Georgia 30230 Teachers, Coaches Need Fair Shake It's that time of year when educators and coaches begin to worry. The schools have made the downhill turn for another school year and are beginning to think about next year. That means contract considerations and time for educators and coaches to be a bit nervous. It appears that sometimes educators and coaches (espe- cially) are not judged in all fair- ness. Sometimes, evaluations and other methods used to measure how good a teacher or a coach is, doesn't give a complete pic- ture. Some educators may be good at their jobs, but are judged on personality or other things that should never be con- sidered. As in any job, we are not doing it to win a personali- ty contest or to be liked by everyone, they are there to do the job to the best of their abil- ity. MANY GOOD COACHES have been fired over trivial mat- ters. There was a coach at my high school that lost his job sim- ply because a board member felt he was being unfair to his child. The truth of the matter was, he wa one of the fairest coaches I'd ever met. Believe me, I played for a number of coaches during youth sports, elementary sports and middle school. By the time I was in high school, I knew if a coach was fair or not and this man was very fair. He treated everyone the same and held each of us to the same set of rules and stan- dards. Some coaches have lost their jobs because they were consid- ered to be "too much of a disci- plinarian." While it's a well known fact that disciplined teams perform better and usu- ally have a good winning per- centage. My point is coaches are judged on factors like.., how want to enjoy the game. Contrary to popular belief, kids like playing first and winning second. Another thing that should be considered is what rules the coach plays by. Does his rules apply to everyone on the team, or just certain players? Everyone should have to follow the same rules and suffer the same consequences, regardless if the team is winning or losing or ff the player is a starter or a substitute. How much does have the players lear-ned and improved should come into play. Tradition does not come over night and neither does a good solid pro- gram. Another thing that should be considered is the coach's char- acter. Does he or she display good morals and instill those same morals in their players? THE LIST could go on and on, however to put it simply.., a coach should be judged for much more than a win and loss percentage. After all, superintendents and principals are charged with the same responsibilities as coaches. However, they are not judged solely on s like the school's student graduation per- centage, the percentage of the students who dropout, whatper- centage go to college or if the children have all the necessary skills to make it life. They are judged on overall performance, it should be the same with coach- many games they've won, what es. type of personality they have, When a coach makes a mis- and so on and so on. I would be take, thousands\\;of eyes are the first to admit that a coach watching. I understand that needs to win, but other factors should be considered in the equation. The talent a coach has to work with should be considered. The type of competition his team has to play is another. There are far too many others to list in this column. However, when principals and board members are consid- ering whether coaches should be granted a contract renewal or not, there are several key fac- tors that seem to never be con- sidered. First of all, how well is the coach liked by his players? To tell the truth, most players t because it is the sae way in the print industry. \\;\ when the average person makes a mistake on their job, maybe two or three people know. When a coach or newspa- per person makes a mistake, many know. I WOULD HOPE our local schools would'.consider more than wins and losses when con- sidering contracts for local coaches next season. I would hope character, ability and their attitudes toward their players and students would also be con- sidered. HCX;ANSVUJX HOME NES is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgla 31816. USPS 620-040. Sukscfiption rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriweffer Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes, Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Cngia 30230. Ftm SL'BSCnlFn call (7) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Merc. Publicati, E O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. PAs'rER: Send addretctmnges to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 34)230, STAFF Publisher ar Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Aiate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John KuykeaxiaB As)ciate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Pdchardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ................ : ...................................................... Michael C. Strider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ....................................................................... .Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ..................................................................... : ........................... Lon Camp Assistant Editor .......................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, tauten King Legals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Receptionist and Classifieds ................................... ........................................... Clem Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Llfn Pressroom ................................................................ aavid Boggs and Wayne Cavchowski Im otnct.ns President ................................................................................................... .MiUard B. C, rirr Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S, C_ain Secretary ............................................................................................... J.at Grimes corer PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - FEBRUY 8, 2001 D Flag Pays Tribute To All State Heroe0000! lurch What is most uplifting about Georgia's new state flag is that it pays honor and tribute to all of the state's heroes, from the gal- lant militiamen who fought at King's Mountain against British troops and German Hessians in the Revolutionary War to the GIs who battled from Pacific island to Pacific island and stormed the beaches of Normandy to stem the fide of tyranny in World War H. They deserve tribute as surely, or more so, than those Georgians who fought in the uni- forms of the Confederacy, and the new  properly recognizes that fact - and who can speak against that tribute? As Gov. Roy Barnes point- ed out, the Confederacy is part of Georgia's history, but it is not two- thirds of it, as the flag adopted in 1956 proclaimed - loudly and bla- tantly. In the 267 years since Gen. Oglethorpe and his colonists came ashore, Georgia has been a British colony for 43 years, a U.S. state for 263 years, and a state of the Confederacy for just four yea. THUS, THE NEW flag is a far more accurate portrayal of Georgia's heritage and history. The forebears of many more liv- ing C-eorgian fought or lived through World War H, the Korean War and the Viemam War than fought in the Civil War. For some reason, there is no Sons of World War II veterans, despite real sons still alive of those veterans. The new flag recognizes those gallant Georgians, "the greatest genera- tion" who saved democracy for the entire world. The '%attle flag" was never the official flag of the Confederacy, by the way. Nor was it the flag actual Confederate veterans chose as the state's banner in 1878. It was adopted in 1956 by legislators sev- eral generations removed from the Civil War so th uld e it at that year's Democratic con- vention. Party rules forbade the waving of any banners but state flags, so the Confederate battle symbol was added to the Georgia flag, so it would be allowed. The flag was changed as suddenly and without public input in 1956 as in 2001, but without the Iongtime debate that centered on the recent flag. The pre-1956 flag was widely accepted for more than 80 years and no group had sought its change. But the 1956 flag has been debated since the day it was adopted. The most dramatic and thorough debate took place in 1992-93 when Gov. Zell Miller sought to change the flag. The time for further debate was past, minds and emotions were made up long ago. A refer- endum, suggestedby some, would have kept the state in turmoil for months and left scars that would have benefitted no one. Latter-day Confederates can st use the battle flag as they see fit, placing it on vehicles, at their homes or waving it wherever they choose. They just won't be able to claim that they are flying the offi- cial flag of Georgia. That flag belongs to all Georgians now. WE PARTICULARLY are proud of this area's state sena- tors, Dan Lee of LaGrange and Seth Harp of Columbus, who cast crucial votes in favor of the new flag, despite early misgivings and enormous pressure - eventhreats - from supporters of the battle flag. Lee and Harp represent areas to which tourism is criti- cally important to the economy, and Harp represents an area that is the site of one of the U.S. Arrays most important installations - Fort Benning. They cast couragoous votes and Harp had the additional bur- den of voting against the majori- ty of his own party's senators and representatives. Some Republican leaders now complain they were exclud- ed from the process of changing the flag, but their legislative lead- ers had clearly stated in early January that the flag was "a Democratic problem," and Republicans should not even take a position on it. The modern Republican Party in Georgia has its roots in Harris County and Columbus, and its founders stressed the need to free Georgia from the total Democratic control of the past, which had held back its educa- tional and economic develop- ment. It is ironic that today's Republicans tried to preserve a divisive remnant of that past. Sen. Harp did not succumb to that temptation, and both he and Sen. Lee now have much stronger hands to play in the legislature. Georgia today is about vic- tory, not defeat; the present and the future, not the past. It is the 10th mosrpepulous state in the nation; the unchallenged leader of the New Soutlx Sens. Lee and Harp helped assure that Georgia keeps that status. -MiUard B. Grimes, Presidem, Grimes Pubficafimm, PubUsher, Harris Cmatty Journal More About Flags During its four years of exis- tence the Congress of the Confederate States adopted no less than three official flags, none of which was the battle flag, so widely associated with the Confederacy today. But ironically, that design - with its prominent display of the St. Andrew's Cross - was indeed proposed to the first Confederate Congress by William Porcher Miles of South g, chair- man of the Committee of Flag and Seal. The Congress rejected Miles' proposal, ath one culing it as a flag somewhat similar U.S. flag, with three a horizontal area corner containing seven one for each that time. But Miles' "sus proved popular and became the official of the most famous legion, the Army of virginia. Another flag, larly as the "stainless because of its use of a was adopted on May 1, did include the battle flag space at the upper left, but I fourths of it was the white  A third official approved in March 1865, added a broad red bar to end of the stainless did not enlarge the battle Georgia's official a Confederate state simply Constitution," supported i pillars of Justice, Wisdo Moderation, against a white! S grund,t an 1878 constitut He convention held after the -e>g Reconstruction, and do ae ed by true Confederate vet the a state flag was adopted tha only minor changes flew  Georgia until the sudden an )g prising change by the le in 1956, nearly 80 years latunty nearly 100 years after th att ended. Sum !ught (Most of this from The Flags of the by Devereaux D. tr ated book The book contains tions of the various flags, and battle flags, and may avail #.0trg-an Publishing Co., P.O. Gretna, La. 70054,  1729.) A1 Those Recruits That Didn't Make i Recruiting season for top high school football players is over. Young men who were offered scholarships have made their choices as to which insti- tutions of higher or lower learn- ing they will attend in the fall. Due to the heightened aca- demic and character require- ments for incoming athletes at most universities, however, some athletes who would have been eligible for signing under last year's requirements were not eligible this year. I have managed to obtain a list of some of the high school athletes who would have been able to sign had they not been boneheads and social outcasts. Here are some examples from the list: *Marvin Toodler, wide receiver, Corn Silk, Nebraska: Caught 417 touchdown passes and two known venereal dis- eases during his high school Career. Unfortunately, when he took his SAT exam, that's all he did. Sat. Marvin now plans to work for his father, Mr. Toodler, in the family worm-farm busi- ness. Leon (Neon) Devon, run- ning back, Corpus Christi, Texas: What made recruiters suspicious that Leon might be academically deficient was the questionnaire he sent back to interested schools. On each questionnaire, he not only mis- spelled his name, he also doo- dled in the margins with a yel- low crayon and listed his home town as "Korpus Krispy." Plans to remain in Texas and seek work repairing anvils. Norman Glovemeyer III, quarterback, Palm Beach, Florida: Starred at Palm Beach's private Ralph Lauren Academy. Was run over by a polo pony dur- ing the off-season, however, and suffered head injuries that made him think he is a cocker spaniel. His father, a wealthy Eastern industrialist, plans to buy him his own Gucci shop as soon as Norman stops chasing Mercedes 380Sls down Worth Avenue. Arnold (Stumpy) Wordsworth, linebacker, why- not, Georgia: 6'3" 290. Got the nickname "Stumpy" from his instructors. Not only didhe not answer any questions correctly on his SAT, he ate his pencil. Wants to become air- traffic controller. Gunther Dappleman, defensive tackle, Shade Tree, Missouri: Stands 7'3" and weighs 416. Ineligible because of steroid addiction. Alfonidius Johnson, defen- sive back, Slick Snake, Florida: Was courted by over 250 schools until it was learned he was given a frog to dissect in biology class and the frog talked him out of it. Plans career wrestling alli- gators at Crazy Al's reptile farm and discount fireworks. Ramundo Santiago Ornamata Diego Francisco (Earl) Zapata, soccer-style placekicker, Bogota, Colombia: Approached by many U.S. schools, turned down all offers, however, to take better paying job in '' business. S&E (Meathead) Monella, 6 '2", 240, linebacker, Thickneck, New Jersey: Currently at Penn State. Prison. Convicted of marl fraud, writing bad checl trying to rob a Roto-Root0 he mistook for a Brink's 1 Plans to become television gelist after parole. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, HOMENEWSI ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, WHO GREW NEARBY MORELAND, GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD BELONGED BF.LONGED TO THIS , OF WHICH SOOFI'EN OF 1-85 FROM HOGANSVIIJ IS NAMED I HONOR. THE I2EWIS MUSEUM WAS MORELAND IN 1996, AND A ING AND EDITING LAB DEDICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED SALE THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC NATIONWIDE. What Exactly Do We Try To Mean? Just some 19 or 20 days ago our country inaugurated its 43rd president. As we all know this election will go down in his- tory as one of the most, to say the least, unusual ever. Although this was a fiercely fought campaign and election, as most are, it seeaned to me that the special interest groups were also more vocal. I dont know if they were more vocal or they just received more media cov- erage. Be that as it may, as the election drew to its conclusion and as then President-elect Bush began making public his appo'mtees, once again the spe- cial interest groups spoke out in OPlXmition_ It is fib t that one of the most vocal groups during this whole process was the NOW group (National Organization for Women). The NOW has made many claims and many attempts to dissuade women from the 'tra- ditional' roles of women in our society. Patricia Ireland has pro- meted that those who hold to a biblical view of males and females are out to "take back the rights of women," as she stated in an article in August of 1997. May I state unequivocal- ly that is not what the biblical view of males and females states, when Bible believing preachers stand and proclaim that men are to be the head of the house and that wives are to be in submission to their hus- bands many get the idea that women are being put down. That is not the case and if that is not th case, then what do we mean? If one would only study the scripture, one would find that instead of low rating women, the Bible seeks to put them in an honored place. When one says that men are to be the head of the house, one is not speak- ing about superiority or i ority, nor ability or being referred to. In be the first to admit many ladles who are superior in maturity, ability, and emotional than many men. It must stood that nowhere in are men elevated to be or to women. IN CONCLUSION, meant? May I answer reiterating what is not The biblical view of but a matter of God roles. If we are to see ety turn around, our must return to the created the male and the