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Manchester, Georgia
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February 10, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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February 10, 2000
 

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OPINION ....j, =4 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A Grimes Publication Mnlard B. Grimes, Preeideflt USPS S20.040 MIKE HAIZ PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR BRYAN GemR ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON Busnss I'IANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Ocial Legal Organ, City of Hogamville ," A: Valentine Story 7 %% ;% What comes to mind when February 14th is mentioned? Valentine's Day, of course. As a man, you think about that one person you love so much, the one you would die for, your sweetheart. You then have to decide what could be the best gift to pur- chase for her. The first thing that always comes to my mind is a large heart made'of pure chocolate. Then you think, "The last time I brought her candy she said it would make her FAT," so you rush over to the aisle where the soft cuddly teddy bears are. Then you think, "Maybe I'll just buy both, that way she can have the cuddly toddy bear and I can eat the candy." But then you start to think, "What is Valentine's Day with- out a card?" So you run over to the Hallmark shop and browse through all the cards until you find the right one (when you care enough to send the very best). On your way home you think again how lucky you are to have such a wonderful sweetheart. On the spur of the moment you decide to stop by the local jewelry store and purchase a beautiful, sparkling diamond for your special dy. A dozen roses would be a great way to top off the day, but by this time your wallet says they will have to wait until her birthday. With a sense of joy and sat- isfaction you speed down the road toward home. As you enter the driveway, you notice the lights are off and you sigh with obvious disap- pointment; you slowly walk up to the door, unlock it and walk into an empty house. To your surprise, the lights come on and your 'sweety' stands there in the sexiest out- fit you've seen since the last Victoria's Secret catalog came in the mail. She says the six most beautiful words your ears have ever heard, "I love you, Happy Valentines Day." After a big hug and kiss, you realize the smell of your favorite food is coming from the kitchen. The two of you walk hand-in-hand into the dining room to find a special 'candle- light' dinner she spent hours preparing for you, the most important man of her life. After dinner, instead of dessert, the two of you go into the den and cuddle on a blanket near the fireplace and you real- ize how blessed you are to have each other. Maybe you've been married awhile, and she's sent the kids to the neighbors so the two of "The original holi- day was called the Feast of St. Valentine and it was a religious holiday. Cupid, who came along later, was a character from pagan mythology." you can have some private "couple" time With no interrup- tions. Although this might sound familiar, our Christian ances- tors would be surprised to real- ize what has become of Valentine's Day. The original celebration was called the Feast of St. Valentine and it was a religious holiday. Cupid, who came along later, was a character from pagan mythology. For Christians in the past, this was a day to remember and celebrate the life and death of a Christian martyr. According to church tradi- tion, St. Valentine was a priest near Rome about 270 A.D. He was arrested for performing Christian marriages, while oth- ers say his true crime was help- ing Christians escape prison. During his trial he was asked about his convictions regarding the Romans gods Jupiter and Mercury. He boldly said they were false gods, and that the God whom Jesus called Father was the only true God. This result- ed in his imprisonment for insulting the pagan gods. According to legend, he con- tinued to minister while in prison. After God healed a prison guard's blind daughter, he led 46 members of the guard's family to salvation and baptism. When the emperor heard about this event, Valentine was beheaded. Valentine knew the risk he was taking but was willing to die to free prisoners and spread the Good News of Jesus Christ. The Bible says, "No one has greater love than this, to lay down his life for a friend." John 15:13. Jesus gave us the ultimate "Valentine" when he gave his life as a sacrifice for our sins. Remember to tell the ones you love how special they are to you every day. Happy Valentines Day! T Hot;nzwn HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620.040. Subscription rates by mail: $15 Mefiwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR SUSSCRmnONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. P(rMAsIY: Send addrcss changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansvillc, GA 30230. SrAmr Publisher and Advertising Director ....................................................  ............... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Elitor ................................................................ John Kuykcndall Associate Editor ................................................................................................. .Bryan Geter Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ............................................................................. Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ......................................................................................... Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski CommaAa  President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secmta ................................................................................................ Lama Grimes Cofer Twsumr .............................................................................................. Kathy Grincs Garrcu Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - FEBRUARY 10, 2000 'Don't Forget It's Valentine's Day Well now, here it is another their names in any article- well,  ' ...... ':: .... ,:i: ::, and things i"" "  right gloomy Monday, but we here are their names (and here crying when I remember thebeautifuldayand they are in an article): Henry !. made the effort to € the good time we had yester- C., Willie D. and Margaret r'  then, I'm too day, so all is forgiven. DeBardieben.  Wewouldhavei The wife had cooked up a Henry lives in Anniston, but the party celebrating my three Alabama, and Margaret and sit up much lon score and ten birthday. Now Willie live in Lowndesboro, it was because when she cooks up something, Alabama. They are fine rela- you can bet your money it's tire, and I love them, but they "You can forget your ran out before the goingto happen. Mybirthday can all talk the horns off a Billy wife's birthday and live. Let me really isn't untilWednesday, but Goat. No matter what conver- YOU can forget Ground of advice: (it she wanted to have the party sation is on the floor, they just Hog Day, Flag Day, Dog to heed, including while I was still here and all, speak a little louder. I also have You can forget and Wednesday was three daYS another cousin, Sara Gane, who Days and other special birthday and live. away. Who can tell what might is more my age. She, too, was days and live. But you get Ground Hog Do happen in three days? born with a bad case of talkitis cab Bot forget Dog Days and othera, " yOU  It was a good party and and has never recovered. She Valentine'8 Day. and live. But 4: although it was a "no present" couldn't come because of the get Valentine's D party, some broke the rule and ,distance from Mobile. Throw mother cried all the way home. be reading this onB, brought one, which I do not in my brother Dave, who also Later, in demonstrating how it Day. If you have intend to send back, but deeply talks, and get them all going and happened, I stuck one prong of not too late - go getl appreciated. I mainly appreci- you'veneverheardsuchasound the pitch fork through my foot. Let her know you r ate the many friends, and rela- in all your born days - and I love I must have a thing with pitch Uncle Jim Bob tire, who came. We had three every minute of it. forks - and I haven't touched day once. That is first cousins who came. Now We used to play together as one since, wears his head a b these are real relatives who do children. Once during a small My nieces, Pam Bain and side and why not even know their Uncle Jim game of "Get Allan", I stuck a Betty Knopp, and my sister-in- remains closed.  Bob and Aunt Suzy. They corn- pitch fork in Margaret's leg. law, Odell and Marilyn, kept A word to the r plainod they had never seen That made quite a to-do. My juice (not elderberry) poured "Happy Valentines]h, | la Getting Electric Power to Warm Spnl President Roosevelt estab- described a new cottage he had : , him about the rat a " lished the REA by executive built in Dutchess Cohnty) cut, Arkwright went do order in 1935. It was made per- strip and creosote an "electric Springs from Atl manent by statute the follow- pole" for $10, but how a similar Roosevelt and[ ing year. It provided transmis- pole bpught form the power Carpenter, the f sion systems for electric power company would cost $40. "That business manager. to communities that private is the whole basis of the REA Roosevelt said companies would notserve - or thing. The REA is being done refrigeration planti would serve only at prohibitive in large part, of course, by the dry, but could not ! cost., farmers themselves in a coop- cents a kilowatt h By 1934, Roosevelt's erative way." electricity he thoug Georgia farm had been electri- Martin, president of the cost for such a fled. In 1933 the Georgia Power THE SITUATION regard- Alabama Power Company, "We Arkwright said the Company, a state private ing electric power in Warm in this and neighboring coun- would get its addit monopoly, agreed to provide the Springs was certainly a frus- tiesaresufferingfromtheusual tricity at two cents power, providing Otis Moore trating one. No wonder high cost and inefficient ser- hour, under the scl built his own transmission line. Roosevelt learned a lot from it. vice of small local plants." reduced costs as c Moore did it at Roosevelt's Not only was power expensive In 1928, the Georgia Power went up. expense, of course. It cost when he first went there, it was Company bought the Warm $351.32. Almost all the cost also extremely unreliable. The Springs distribution system, IT WAS JUST came for 18 poles at $8.50 each night of the season-opening fes- "partly because of Mr. improvement in tt and two miles of copper wle at tivities of the Meriwetlaer Inn Roosevelt's urging,', according rural people that Ra $140.30. in 1925, the power failed, to the company's official histo- in mind in his figli Most farmers in Georgia, The power in Warm Springs ry. It reduced the rate from 18 er power. the rest of the South and else- was provided by a local compa- cents per kilowatt hour to about A farmer who where would have been bur- ny, whichbought itspower from three cents, laundry or refrige dened by the expense, but at asmallmunicipallyownodplant Later, the rate for the anceswouldbemo˘ least some of them could afford in Manchester, five miles away. Georgia Warm Springs terlife. Roosevelt sa it. The cost for poles and wires Roosevelt did not like any of Foundation was reduced fur- as having more th was much higher when bought this, and he did not wait till he ther. That was in 1929. Basil fort as a goal. Hebe from private utilities, became President and could O'Connor told Preston advancement woul Roosevelt explained later how launch an REA to do something Arkwright, president of the electric lines. rural property owners (this about it. Georgia Power company, that (Next week: Pro time in New York, as he In 1926, he wrote Thomas Roosevelt would like to talk to the Power Compan Why I Get No Kic k (00ut of Socc Twenty-one reasons why I hate soccer and wouldn't pay attention to a World Cup match if it was going on in my back- yard and the beer was free: 1. There are only three final scores in soccer. They are 0-0, 1-0, and in a real scoring orgy, 1-1. 2. Being able to bounce a ball off one's head isn't that impressive to me. I've seen seals dothe same thing on The Ed Sullivan Show. 3. Soccer breeds fan vio- lence because it's very dull, and when the fans get bored, they pass the time by trying to kill and maim one another. 4. Nobody ever throws a high, inside fastball in soccer, baseball's answer to killing and maiming. 5. A man named Phil Woosnam, then president of the North American Soccer League, once bragged to me, "In twenty years, soccer will be bigger than pro football in the United States." That was twen- ty-five years ago. 6. Soccer is responsible for soccer-style kickers in American football. I agree with the late Norman Van Brocklin, who was asked his reaction to the game, after his Atlanta Falcons had been beaten on a last-minute field goal by some guy from Yugoslavia or Afghanistan. Van Broeklin said, "They ought to tighten the immigra- tion laws in this country." 7. It was a referee's contro- versial call in a soccer match that started World War I. No, I can't prove that, but I don't have to. 8. Too many soccer teams were dark socks with their shorts, a violation of every fash- ion law ever written. 9. The theme song for the British Broadcasting Corporation's coverage of the World Cup is Luciano Pavarotti's version of "Nessun Dorma," from Puccini's opera Turandot. The theme song of'WGN's coverage of the Chicago Cubs baseball is Harry Caray singing "Take Me Out to the Ball Game." 10. If soccer were an American politician, it would be Alan Cranston. 11. If it were an American actress, it would be Florence Henderson. 12. Parents of kids who play soccer in American schools are overbearing and obnoxious. It's because they are secretly upset their kids were to wormy to try out for football 13. My alma mater, the University of Georgia, over- came all sorts of odds and won the College Baseball World Series. I realize that doesn't have a thing to do with soccer, but I just thought I would men- tion it. 14. If Georgia has a soccer team, I am blissfully unaware of it. 15. Bo doesn't know diddly about soccer. 16. I was in London once and watched the Super Bowl of British soccer matches on tele- vision because there wasn't anything else on. The two teams ran up and down the field for "7. It was a refer- ee's controversial call in a soccer match that started World War I. No, I can't prove that, but I don't have to. ' approximately three hours, but nobody could score. They decided to play anoth- er game two nights later. I watched that, too. I'd seen all the churches, museums, and china shops I wanted to see by that time. They ran up and field again for an hc and then the ball hit the head and went i completely by acci  the final score was 1 When the game two guys came on' and analyzed it for minutes. 17. If soccer we etable, it would be a. 18. Hitler was P soccer fan. 19. Parents of children who play react violently to and write me a lot threatening letters. what they deserve f wimps: 20. If soccer American soft drin be Diet Pepsi. 21. How 'bout thel