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Manchester, Georgia
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February 14, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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February 14, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas )U TH---E HOGANSVILLE HOM00 NEW----S " " T Being Fit to be Tied at the Plaz00 MIKZ HAI PU BLISHER/AD VERTLSIN G DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDAI ASSOCIATE PUBLISHFITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSlSrAN'r EDnxR JAYNE GOWN Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 A 6rinte. lMJliratimt Mi,ard B. Games, President Legends Surround Valentine Tradition Since we are celebrating Valentine's Day this week, I thought some of the myths and legends surrounding the cele- bration might be of interest to our readers. Valentine's Day is cele- brated around the world and each country has its own way of celebrating. Here in the good old US of A and in Canada, presents wrapped in red and whitepaper and bows, ballorr bouquets, heart shaped boxes of candy, flowers and stuffed animals are the traditional way to cel- ebrate. In England, British chil- dren sing special songs on Valentine's Day and receive gifts for candy, fruit or money. In some ares of England, peo- ple bake Valentine's buns to share. In Italy, families hold a Valentine's Day feast which the entire family attends. One of the most interest- ing ways of celebrating Valentine's Day is done in Britain and Italy. In those coun- tries, unmarried women get out of bed before sunrise and stand by the window watching for a man to pass. They believe that the first man they see, or some- and chant .... "I saw Hempseed, HempseeA I saw. He that loves me best, Come after me nOW." Their true loves supposed- ly appeared to them. IN ANOTHER custom in England, women names were written on a slip of paper and men would draw them from a jar. The woman whose name was drawn, became his Valentine and he paid special attention to her. Many men gave gifts to their Valentine. some believe this custom began the custom of today of giving gifts to the one we love on Valentine's Day. Also during the 1700s, sto- ries were told that groups of friends would meet to draw names. For several days, each one wore his Valentine's name one whoAooks like him, will marry them with.in a year. I guess some people still do believe in fate. In Denmark, people send pressed white flowers called snowdrops to their friends. Danish men also send a gaekke- brev (joking letter) to their sweethearts. The men don't sign theirnames, only made a dot for each letter of his name on the letter. If the woman guesses who he is, she will be rewarded with an Easter Egg at Easter. Now that's an inex- pensive gift ANYWAYYOU cutit, most Valentine's Day customs involve ways that single women could figure out who their husbands might beor at least catch one. English women of the 1700swrotemen'snames on scraps of paper, rolled each name in a little piece of clay and dropped them all into water. The first piece of paper that rose to the top was sup- posedly the wonn's true love. Wonderffthat's Wlere the term drowning in love dames from? Also in the 1700, unmar- ried women pinned'ive hay leaves to their pillows on the eve of Valentine's Day. They pinned one leaf to the center of the pillow and one to each corner. If the charm worked, they saw their future husbands in their dreams. Wonder if sometimes they awoke screaming thinking they were hfiving a night- mare? Some customs were prac- ticed long ago in England were very interesting. In one, young women would circle a church three to 12 times at midnight on his sleeve The sa n, "Wearing his heart on his sleeve" is believed to have come from this practice. There are many ways to celebrate Valentine's Day, but the funny thing is no one is real- ly sure how Valentine's Day started. Different authorities believe the day began in vari- ous ways. Some have traced it to an ancient Roman festival called Lupercalia This was a festival held by ancient romans on February 15 to ensure protec- tion from wolves. Other experts connect the event with one or more Saints of the early Christian church. some link it to the old English belief that birds choose their mates on February 14. The early Christian church had at least two saints named Valentine, which some believe it was established in their honor. According to one myth, the Roman Emperor Claudius II in the A.D. 200s forbade young men to marry, the emperor thought single men made bet- ter soldiers. A priest named Valentine disobeyed the emperor's order and secretly married young couples. For whatever reason, in A.D. 496, Saint Pope Gelasius I declared February 14 as St. Valentine's' Day. There are many other myths and legends about Valentine's Day and other explanations about why the day is celebratetZ For whatever reason, it has always been and always will he knows as the "holiday for love." THE H(ANSVlLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercur Publiing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere, Prices include all ,sales taxes. Perkxtical postage paid at Hogartsville, Georgia 30230. FoR scascmllo call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. Pos-rM,asn: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAff Publir and Advertising Director. ............................................................. .Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richard_son Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advetsing Manager ................................................................. .Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ....................................................................................... Linda Lester Composing ................................................................................................ Valinda Ivery Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayae Goktste Pressman .................................................................................. : ....... Wayne wski Pressnx)m .......................................................................... David Boggs, Larry Colleges COmaaATE Orns President. ........................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes VicePresident ............................. . .................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary .......................................................................................... ara  Cofer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grim Gart Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. .lames S. Grin (Written in 1987) I was staying at the Plaza Hotel in New York recently (my publisher was paying for the room, that's why I wasn't at a Motel 6 in Newark), and I went to have lunch in one of the hotel's spiffy restaurants. For the occasion, I wore a blue blazer, accentuated by a pair of khaki trousers and a white golf shirt I'd worn only once before. I knew I was in trouble the moment I saw the maitre d'. He was a tall, wispy sort of fellow who was probably born with his nose turned up flaat way. I wasn't absolutely cer- tain he was light in his loafers, but when he traveled across the restaurant escorting guests to their tables, he touched the floor only once or twice. "Table for three," I said to the maitre d', once he had landed back at his station. He looked at me as ff he were looking at a dead cat in the highway. The right side of his lip curled upward, his nostrils half flared, and the lid of his eye went to half- mast. "Gentlemen," he said,"are required to wear ties when they dine here." There are a number of phrases I enjoy saying at times such as these, but my two companions were ladies, and I was afraid Donald Trump, who owns the Plaza, might be within earshot. So I abstained. I wear ties only to funer- als of close relatives or heads of state. I stopped wearing ties during the late to middle 70s because they made me feel uncomfortable. I especially hate to eat while wearing a tie. Once I was at a banquet and they served barbecue chicken with lots of red sauce on it. My tie at the beginning of the meal was blue. At the end, it was red. I gave the tie to my dog. He ate it. I'm also convinced ties restrict the blood flow to the brain, causing such disorders as forgetfulness, blurred eyesight and even criminal tendencies. A1 Capone was rarely seen without a tie. The same goes, incidentally, for Richard Nixon. Anyway, I don't see what difference it makes whether or not you wear a tie to a restaurant at least as long as you are wearing a jacket and clean underwear. I told the Plaza maitre d' I didn't own a tie, and he went into a closet and fetched one. It was black. Perfect for a blue blazer. The trouble was, I could- n't remember how to tie a tie. Neither of my companions could either. Getting hungry now, I asked for help from the lady checking ctts. She did a lit- tle better than the rest of us. When she finished tying the tie around my neck, the thin part that's supposed to be short was long, and the big part that's supposed to be long was short. Although I now looked like a complete idiot, wear- ing an incorrectly tied tie with a golf shirt, I was shown to my table. I chuckled as I recalled a sign I saw recently in one of Atlanta's Long Horn Steak Houses. Long Horns don't care much about pretension. The sign said NO SHIRT, NO SHOES, NO SERVICE. BRA AND PAN00 OPTIONAL. The meal was exce I got mayonnaise on myt BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD, GREW UP IN MORELAND, AND THE MOST WIDELY GEORGIA WRITER TIME. TO ALL AMERICA PARTICY TO THIS AREA OF OF WHICH HE OFTEN, AND WHERE A TION OF I-8S FROM TO HOGANSVILLE IN HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM IN EDITING LAB IS BEING] ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF GEORGIA., BOOKS AND TAPES ARE $ AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 191266, ATLANTA, GA 1266 AND AT BOOK If God Seems to Make No As a pastor there are many questions that people direct my way. These ques- tions encompass a variety of fields ranging from the White House to the church house. But, most questions are directed to the spiritual side th. Not longag3/dile ting a lady in a nursing home (a dear child of God who was suffer- ing greatly), the question of all questions was asked. The lady who was in terrible agony, asked, "Why am I suf- fering so?" She went on to say that she had tried to live like she should, she loved her faro- fly, loved her church, and she said she had not killed any- one and she wanted to know why she was suffering. That is a question that has been asked since the days of Job. Why do the godly suffer? Why do those who try to live right, do right, and serve God seem to suffer the most? I will be the first to tell you that I do not have all the answers and most of the time, very few of the answers. To us, God is not making any sense. Although the final answer to our questions may not be known until we get to Heaven, the Bible does give us help that we may be faithful and carry on through the dark days of life. Whether one suf- fers from a physical illness, a family problem, or some other trial that causes pain, there is relief found in God's Word. The first thing we must consider is the death of our Lord Jesus on the cross. Jesus was a man who suffered, bled and died, not for any wrong- doing of his own, but for the sins of others. Jesus suffered at the hands of men, even though he was the sinless Savior. We read in John 15:20, "Remember the word that I said unto you. The servant is not greater than his lord. If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you; if they have kept my saying, they will keep yours also." Since Christ suffered for seemingly no reason, we are called to do the same. Today, saints are not per- secuted in the way of years gone by, although the time that happens will eventually return in the Tribulation Period according to the book of Revelation: The majority of suffering today is physical suffering. Some physical suf- fering is due to our own fool- ishness by not caring for our body as we should and intro- ducing substances into our body that cause disease. According to I Corinthians 11, some physical suffering is due to sin the life a believer being dealt with by God him- self. Still other physical pain is due to the fall of man and the introduction of sin into the world that has caused our bodies to experience death. But what about those who seem to live right and try to do right but stffi it seems they endure more than their "fair share?" If we are honest, we ] admit that no answers are John chapter 11, the a person fell sick. Jesus, Mary of Lazarus,- ,, delayed his coming. to Mary and Martha, of God was not sense. Upon the Jesus, they said, "If hadst been here, my had not died." What purpose? Many things been said about this but the bottom line is ( a plan. In the end, wei God's plan was for of all. words of Isaiah 55:8, thoughts are not thoughts, neither are ways my ways, sait Lord." We may not stand his ways, but dear of God living for remember, "And we that all things work for good to them that God, to them who" called according to pose." Romans 8:28. 'Workshop Will Help With DEAR EDITOR: Is your child having prob- lems in school? Is your child struggling with learning or having behavior problems? If so, I invite you to attend a free workshop presented by Parents Educating Parents and Professionals (PEPP) to learn how to help your child succeed! The PEPP Workshop will be held on Saturday, February 23, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Harris County Public Library in Hamilton. This freework- shop will focus on laws pro- tecting students with disabil- ities and how to make an edu- cational plan. Parents will receive a notebook contain- hag this information and resources. A free lunch will be provided and door prizes will also be held. Parents Educating Parents and Professionals (PEPP) is a non-profit organ- ization that works to assist students who have a disabil- ity or suspected or a disabil- ity. PEPPis the official Parent Training & Information Center for Georgia. Our Parent Center is funded by the U. S. Department of Education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). For more information on We welcome your letters. Please mail them to: The Hogansville Home News P O. Box 426 Hosvill Georgia 30230 Phase fax them to: 70G84G2206 Pkase & w.r to include an address and phone number 05r ri). how to help your child sue- ceed in school, contact Sue Koone at 663 2763 or our main office in Douglasvil_le at (770)577O771. Come to our workshop on February 23 and learn how to help your child succeed! DEAR EDITOR: SUE KOONE FEPP Parent- Trainer In Coweta County, three people were recently indict- ed in a twelve-year-old dou- ble homicide, as a direct result of utilizing the Georgia Bureau of Investigation's DNA database, Without this valuable resource, chances are extremely remote that these defendants would ever have been indicted in this case. In January 2001, the GBI DNA database made up of DNA samples taken from every felon entering the Georgia prison system the previous year became fully operational. Since that time, it has linked suspects rapes, seven bank robbery, and two I al investigative tool, the field when it solving ing defendants to to victims and their However, the Georgia is ting current funding Georgia Bureau Investigation. are approved, this will a dramatic negative on the information and stored n the GBI database. Therefore, I am ally ap asking that you tact your state the GBrs DNA budget and convey desire to see that the l sary funding available for the able DNA records. munities simply afford to lose this crime-fighting tool. District Coweta JmUdal (