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Manchester, Georgia
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February 17, 2005     The Hogansville Herald
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February 17, 2005
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - THURSDAY, FEB. 17, 2005 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A Gnme ]liation Millard B. Grimes, President JOHN KUYKENDALL PUBLISHER/EDITOR LAURIE LEWIS ADVERTISING DIRECTOR CLINT CLAYBROOK ASSOCIATE EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR Phone (706) 846-3188 - Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230 Nothing Harder Than Losing Your First Love You know that everyone remembers their first love and I'm no exception to the rule. I clearly remember mine. I also remember all those times we spenttogether. The long drives, all those old tunes that played while you were driving along, the nights at the drive-in movies and so on and so on. A wise man once said that a man will never lose the con- nection he had with his very first love and here it is over 30 years later and I still think about her even now. I also remember the heartbreak that came with losing my first love. I still remember that sinking feel- ing the day I had to say good- bye. I remember the void that could not be filled. I've often wondered what became of her and guess I always will. I REMEMBER the first time I saw her. I knew in a split second she was the one for me. So, I plotted and planned how to make her mine and eventually I did. I spent endless hours with her. I pampered her, took care of her and did everything I could to make sure that bad things didn't happen to her. Ironically, while I loved her dearly, my mother did like her too much. It took me years to figure out why she didn't, but I finally did. My dad on the other hand thought she was great. I remember him telling me, "She's a beauty. I know you're happy young man." Most of my friends were jealous of her I think. It seems that many times they could find things wrong with her. I didn't care though, I loved her and that was all that mattered. Funny, I think back now how I was always doing things to make her better, so my friends would envy me just a little more. When we would go places, people would stare at her. I know what they were think- ing.., how beautiful she was and how they wished they had her instead of me. That always made me feel good. WE SPENT SO muchtime together that I remember today every curve on her and every blemish. I also remem- ber how beautiful she looked every morning when I would first see her. I remember every moment we spent together even today, after all these years, and all the fun, excite- ment, happiness and adven- ture she brought into my life. I can also remember every time I was angered when things were not going just right. SHE SET THE standard for me though. Everyone that came after her had to live up to her, or be better than she was, nicer than she was, more beautiful than she was.., well, you get the picture. I've compared every one that came after her to what she was. A mistake I know now because there was not one out there that could live up to her. After all, she was the first, she was the one that I learned from, the one that helped me t realize just what I'd been missing until she became mine. There were many sacri- fices that had to be made just to have her, and I haven't for- gotten those either. I KNOW everyone is won- dering why if Ilove her:s0 much, why I parted with her. Actually, it was not my deci- sion. It was just one of those things that had to be done, not because I really wanted to, but because I had to. It hurt me to do it, no doubt about that. It also haunts me today because she was so special and I really hated giving her up. However, a time comes in every man's life when he knows he has to let go for the sake of himself and the oth- ers that he loves, so, i made the decision and saw it through. I've often regretted.it and tell myself how crazy I was, but at the time and as I said earlier, I knew it was the right thing to do. I still remember to this day exactly how it happened. I still remember her driving away and leaving me stand- ing there with that empty feeling. I still remember the pain that lasted days after she was gone. I guess I always will. However, when you're young and not really mature you don't think down the road, you think in the here and now. If I had thought down the road, I would have given the man his money back, taken my keys back and kept that car forever. My first car, the Lemans that I'll always love. ThE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mfiil: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR SUnSCRn'TIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Editor ............................................................................ John Kukyendall Advertising Director .................................................................. ............... Laurie Lewis Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers ......................  ................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems, Gaff Youngblood Circulation Manager .................................................... ' ..................... Tracy Lynn Wyatt Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon,Darnell McCauley Circulation Distribution .............................................................................. David Boggs CORPORATE OFFICERS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Living Alone Is Not That Great Men who leave their wives and rent apartments together usually wind up liv- ing like dogs. Green things grow on the dishes in the sink, because they are rarely washed. The refrigerator usually has plenty of beer, a frozen enchilada dinner or two, and a three-week-old car- ton of milk. The bathroom is cluttered with dirty towels and discarded underwear. The beds are never made up. The sheets would disgrace a tramp. Cigarette butts pile up in the o.nly ashtray, and the carpet, if there is carpet, gets grimy. There are no curtains. Ants get into the week-old box of doughnuts that was left out on the kitchen table. Wrinkled clothes are scattered about the bedroom floors. There is mold at the bottom of the shower curtain. There is never any toilet paper. Empty beer cans, liquor bottles and empty pizza boxes overflow out of the kitchen trash can. I sat on the living room floor, watching the rented tel- evision, and surveyed this rancid scene, and I wondered what on earth had led me to believe I wanted to live this way. Across town, I had a nice house and a pretty wife who loved me. I had traded that for a death wish of an apart- ment and fat girls in kimonos who called me names. I should have known better. Don't go looking for ham- burger, somebody said once, when you've got steak at home. I traded my steak for bologna. What happened to all those plans of mine? What happened to that vow I had made to myself never to do what my father had done? As it turned out, I had made a lousy husband, too. At least he had an excuse. The war had loused him up. I left, basi- cally, because I thought there might be a party going on and I was missing it. I WAS MISERABLE. I hated the apartment. I hated singles bars. I hated myself. I was lonely. I was depressed. I was hungry. My underwear needed washing. I decided to go back home and beg forgiveness. Just like that, I decided I had made a horrible mistake and I would go back home, never to stray again. I would never go back inside one of those wretched singles bars. I would put my ring back on my finger, and no arrow would ever fly straighter than me. AS I PACKED, I consid- ered the best way to make my return to Paula. I could call her and say I was coming back, but romantic that I was, I decided the moment of my return would be less dramat- ic if I informed her of my plans. I wanted that moment to be splendid. I could see it in my mind: I would drive up into our driveway. She would hear a car door slam, and she would look out the window of the living room and see it was me. She would notice the bags in my hand. The thrill in her would be almost too much to bear. He's home! He's home at last! She would fling open the front door and rush toward me in the yard. Her blond hair would be bounc- ing as she ran. She would jump into my waiting arms and cover me with kisses. "How I have missed you!" she would exclaim breath- lessly. "And how I have missed you, my darling," I would reply. We would go into the house and into our bedroom, and we would make passion- ate love until exhaustion forced us into a peaceful sleep together. In the morning we would talk for hours in our bed, planning each step in our future. We would build our bridge over our troubled waters, as Simon and Garfunkel were singing in those days, with sacred prom- ises. ...to be continued next week BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS IS CARRYING SELECT- ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NEAR- BY MORELAND, AND BECAME THE MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD'S BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAIL- ABLEFOR SALETHROUGH BAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NATION- WIDE. What A Roller Coaster Weekend It Was Saturday was a day of highs and lows for me and my family. Actually, my lows began early Friday morning when our son David appar- ently had an attack of low blood sugar about 4 a.m., and was in no condition to drive to work in Columbus at 5:30 that morning. Normally he comes by our house each morning to fix his breakfast and lunch. , He caltedhis office and told day. About 9 a.m. David felt better and came to our house again to fix his breakfast. Soon after he developed con- vulsions as never before. The Meriwether Ambulance Service and the Manchester 911 service got him under control and got him to St. Francis in Columbus about noon. His blood sugar was back to nor- mal then. His diabetic doctor got David back to an appar- ent normal, but was told that he must stay in the hospital over the weekend. I HAD BEEN asked to represent Grimes Publications, along with Laurie Lewis, at the annual Roosevelt Ball at Warm Springs on Saturday night. As the time drew near for the festivities to begin David was showing signs of improve- ment, and the entire family, including David, insisted I carry out my plans. WE HAD A great evening. Coach Dooley and his lovely wife Barbara served as hon- orary chairmen of the festiv. ities. Coach Dooleyand I have been close since he first came to Georgia in 1963. I remember that first meeting with Coach Dooley and Coach Eaves as if it were yesterday. Dan McGil, who was athletic publicity direc- tor at the time, introduced me to the two coaches. That first meeting came about in Stegman Hall, the home of the athletic depart- ment then. I noticed neither Coach Dooley nor Coach Evans were wearing Bulldog ties, It 'was after this meeting I drove uptown to Dick Fergusons and bought their first Bulldog ties. There out about my condition, but he wrote me three times pro- claiming us "heart brothers" since he had bypass surgery a few weeks before my prob- lem. Of course I thanked him for calling my grandson Ric and his parents up to his office when they were in Athens to sign Ric's baseball scholarship. He extended courtesies I really appreciat- would be no-doubt rfrom this .ed: Ri,oarnod:his beball day forward 'abOut:'their- scholarship. I never men- Georgia allegmnc6 '   tinned is name to anybody Coach Dooley told me Saturday night he remem- bered the instance, but since this time some 42 years ago, his wife Barbara had kept his wardrobe filled with over 100 Bulldog ties. Coach Dooley was very generous to me Saturday when he introduced me to Barbara as one of his earli- est and strongest supporters. I know that I tried every way possible to make his stay in Athens as pleasant as possi- ble. I fondly remember 10 years ago when I had my heart attack and lost my left leg. I don't know how he found in Athens until after he was offered a scholarship. I congratulated Coach Dooley on his choice of Mark Ritch as our new football coach. Coach Dooley defined Coach Richt as a perfect fit into Georgia's football pro- gram. After an early hectic start to this past weekend, I enjoyed my visit Saturday evening with my Bulldog friends, as well as any social event in a long time. And a special thanks to Millard Grimes, Johnny Kuykendall and Laurie Lewis for arrang- ing this most pleasant assign- ment for me. 50 Years Ago... Grand 00ury Recoml ile Tuesday jCounty Detentlo In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor tothe Hogansville Home News BOLD STEP-Aproposed youth detention home was big news in the Feb. 17, 1955 Hogansville Herald. 'q-he Troup County Grand Jury, chosen to serve the February term of the superior court, in its presentments published this week, called upon the county commissioners to make provi- sions for a detention home to be established in Troup County as an aid to deter Crime by juve- niles and set up a a six-man committee to study juvenile delinquency in the county and make rec- ommendations to the proper authorities." PREPARE TO BE CATEGORIZED - Sunday would also be the day of the city's religious cen- sus. 'q-he religious census of Hogansville, spon- sored by the Hogansville Ministerial Association, will begin at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon." Workers would leave their churches to visit homes in the city for the "friendly community study on the reli- gious affiliations of our people." .WATCH OUT! "With March and its accompa- nying winds on the way, safety fire commission- er Zack D. Gravey warned all citizens against burning trash outside when the high winds are holding sway." *CINEMA TIME - Showing at the Royal Theatre was '%hree-Ring Circus," 'q-he Outcast," "Black Fury," 'qhe Yellow Tomahawk," 'q-hree Hours To Kill" and "Phantom From Space: Man or Monster?" WANT AD WONDERS - "Reliable party (man or woman) with auto to service this area with confections and sundries from national whole- sale corporation. No selling. Sure, steady, sub- stantial weekend income with unlimited possibil- ities. $640 cash required." i | I I li 111 IIIIil111 Ilillll I