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Manchester, Georgia
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February 20, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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February 20, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - FEB. 20, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O4O . (6mut':i ]Juhliatmu Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE I-][ALE PUBI.ISt tER/AD\\;q-;I,rI'IHIN(; DIRECTOR JOnN KV'FNDAIJ, ASSO('IATE PUB1.1SI IER/EI)ITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT El)IT( )R JAYNE GOLDffmN BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-31 g8 l.'ax (706) 846-2206 1 O. Box 426 I logansville, Gcwgia a02a0 How Do You Handle Making a Mistake? Sometimes, things happen that are aggravating but are so comical that even though we should be upset we can't help but laugh. Such was the case with a package I was expect- ing back in December. My grandson, who is four, loves to draw and color. I was reading a magazine and saw where Crayola Crayon Company was celebrating ifs 100th annivers, ary and was put- ting out a special anniversary package of assorted crayons, pens, etc. I contacted them and they were shipped. Now, please remember I noted earlier on, I was expecting the package to alTive in December. lst week I received a call from Mail Boxes Etc. in Florida, the caller on the other end of the line was strictly business and seemed very professional. He explained that I had a pack- age they had been trying to deliver to me since early December' but'it apparently did not have the correct ship- ping address. I asked what shipping address the package had and he told me, it was directed to a post office box. The box num- ber was correct; trot somehow the conlpany had inadvertent- ly put the wrong city on the package. It had been sent to Cuthbert and thankfully, the person that had received it returned it to them. "That's alright," I said. "Just send it to 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Ga. 31816." Well, two days later the company was back on the phone with me. This time they had sent the package to 120 North College Street. T.t's the Harris County Journal deliv- ery address. So, I thought that's OK, someone at the Hanfilton office should have accepted the package. So, I quickly asked, "What city did you send it to?" You guessed it. Cuthbert. By this time I was a little aggravated. So, I explained once again that both address- es were in Hamilton. Then I said, "I told you once before, please send it to 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Ga. 31816." Well, about three days later I received a phone call from Harris County Journal Associate Editor Michael Snider "You have a note here from UPS," he said. "They said they tried to deliver a package here and they would deliver it later." I couldn't help but laugh. This was the company's fourth attempt at delivering the pack- age and they still had not sent it to the address I had given %. ! them. Finally, a couple of day s later, Michael walked into the Manchester office with my package in his hand. So rather than a Christmas present, my grandson got an unexpected Valentine's Day gift, which was never delivered to the correct address. I'VE ALSO LEARNED that technology is a wonderful thing, but it's not perfect. Mistakes can be made. Here's another little funny story. A few weeks ago, this lady called me and was a little upset because she had E-mailed me something for the newspaper, but it had not been printed I usually remember things are E-mailed because I check the marl myself. For some reason, the item she was talking with me about didn't ring a bell. "Are you sure you E-mailed it to me?" I asked. Of course this irritated her because she thought that I was questioning her honesty. A few days later, I received the following E-mail: Johnny, Sorry about the mix up. I did E-mail you this, or at least thought I had. I used the E-mail address you publish in the paper each week, but I inad- vertently typed inan incorrect letter. Thought you would get a kick out of the E-mail I received. "Glad to see things are going so well with your son. I know you must be proud of him. However, I'm not sure why I received this e-mail. As far as I know, we've never met. Or maybe I've forgotten that we've met." Imagine my surprise when I realized that Ihad typed in two letters wrong and the e- mail was sent to a person I did- n't even know. I bet he won- dered why I was e-mailing him about my son's making the dean's list at college?" I guess the moral to these Stories, if there is one, is that w e all make mistakes. EP. Jones once said, "Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize .a mistake when you make it again." In other words, we will continue to make mistakes, we simply have to realize that mistakes are just a part of being human. TIlE Hot; Ns, HI,I,: tloxu,: N:s is published eekl', by the S/ar-Me[vur,, t)ubli,hing ('Oral)an 5, a di ision of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Mancheslcr. (;corgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. tlmrin or Mcrixelhcr Counlies; $26 a .',ear elsewhere. Prices include all sates la\\;es. Periodical poslage paid a! Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR ;IIIISCRIIq'IONN call (706) 846-3188 or write It) Civulalion Manage; Star Merctuy Publicalions. t O. Box 426, Mallcheler, (ieOl'gia 31816. Pi)STM %ffl'El: Send address changes to P. O. Bo\\; 426. Ho7ansx illc. GA 30230. S]XFF PubJi/ler and Ad erlising Director, .............................................................. Mike Hale A)ciale Pubtiherand [ditor. ........................................................... John Kuykendall Bushie Manager. ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Assitaut |idilor. ..................................................................................... Rob Riehaxdson Sl:.iff'Vrilcr, .......................................................................... Br)an Geler. Billy Br)anl Assilan! Adcrlising Mallager. ............................................................. ,..l.aurie Lewis Ad\\;cllising Stiles ........................................................................................ Karen Gralll ('onltx/sing .................................................................. Valinda Ivery, Dewayne Flowel:, I .eg, afs ...................................................................................................... Ja) ne (;oldsion ('irculalhm Manager. ..................................................................................... hid) Crc s h'ot ucholl Malutgcr. ........................................................................... obb) Brazil .It. Asilallt Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Glt)chovski Plel'l)om ........................................... l)amell Mc('auley. Joc) Knighi. l.an.3 Colleges (7ORIRIR-tTE ()FFII'EIi [)lcidcliT ............................................................................................. Millard B, Grimes Vice Prei{lcn! .................................................................................. CharloUe S. Grimes I{XCCLIIi\\;C Vice Presidelll and SLcl'eial'). ....................................... [.auF4 Grimes Co|er Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kaltly Grimes Ga,vu I .egal (Munscl and Assistant Secrelary ....................................... ,...i James S. Grimes The Best Beer Joint in Written in 1978 Jim Stone led me inside the "No-Name" beer joint. "This place just ain't been the same," he said, a certain sad- ness and longing in his voice, "since the monkey died." The monkey and its pass- ing are another story I will get around to later. Before that, meet the winner of the Lucille's Memorial Best Beer Joint Search Contest, Jim Stone. Several months ago, I asked for nominations for the best beer joint in the state of Georgia and named it for Lucille, who sold me my first .beer. There were contest rules. The juke box had to be all-country, there couldn't be any mixed drinks or cheese- burgers on sale, wives or girl- friends of regulars weren't allowed, neither were smart- aleck college students and a bottle of imported beer with- in 30 miles of the place would be grounds for automatic dis- qualification. Jim Stone entered the "No-Name" beer joint in Willacoochee. It is called the "No Name" because it doesn't have a name. A broken Pabst sign outside is the only evi- dence the one-room building is where a man can break a dry spell. Otherwise: The jukebox is all-coun- try. Beer costs 55 cents. All beer, including gloriously cold longneck. Cans of Vienna sausage adorn the back counter. There is a sign that says, "No Bumming and No Begging." (They ain't kiddin' says a regular.) There is another sign that says, "No Gambling: Anybody caught gambling will be 'prosuted." There are two pool tables in ttie back, which is the reason for the gambling sign. There is no air condi- tioning. The windows and doors are kept open in the summer and closed in the winter. There is a new paint job on the outside toilet, despite the fact an indoor facility was installed a month ago. You can stil];.use the out- door toilet if you want to. The regulars inside do a lot of pulpwooding in the swa'hap, but they are friend- ly. The bartender's name is "Hoss," and he chews tobac- co. The first prize in the Lucille's Memorial Best Beer Joint Search Contest was that I come to the winner's favorite spot, and we drink beer and I pick up the tab. We started as the evening sun was going down on Willacoochee, which strad- dles the Seaboard Coastline tracks and Highway 82 between Pearson and Alapaha, on the west end of Atkinson County, a hard day's ride from Atlanta in the flats and piney woods of deep south Georgia. Jim Stone had driven from Douglas, where he works for South Georgia College. "A lot of folks come here from Douglas," he explained. "Willacoochee is to Douglas what Hyannis Port is to Boston." "Hess" was behind the bar, his jaw bulging. Luther, one of the regulars in overalls, had dropped by. So did Lace Futch, the mayor of Willacoochee, a man of con- stant good humor. Amos, the jailer, was there and so was Henry, who owns the No- Name. Henry was proud he won the contest. "I can use the business," he said. "You ain't doing so bad, are you Henry?" as!d Jim Stone. "I ain't saying for sure," replied Henry,"but I got three head of young 'uns at the house, ain't none of 'em miss: ing no meals." We sat ourselves down at one of the two tables, the one nearest the jukebox, which Henry turned up because we asked him to. The hot, south Georgia sun poured in through the windows. Tired and thirsty men who sweat for a living poured in through the doors. She stood outside the door, not daring to some 'in. She wore Bermudas. barefoot in the sand. an infant on her hip. "Your old lady's out! Henry said to a as he pulled on a tall The young man beer, slowly. Only then walk outside and with his family. Jim Stone around to the monkey A few years was a girl in town an excellent er. Her Family got her ! key for high school tion. But he messy. Her girl to give the money "She brou Jim Stone. "It was of smart y. trained it to take the off the table body passed out." I had to ask how key died. "Bad diet," Jim long on just beer and! The tab for the afternoon was and that even round of Vienna sausa Conway Twitty's on the jukebox. BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATlg GRIZZARD, WHO BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF Hit PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATIANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES 1 WIDE. France Issue: Long Live the It is hardfor many of us to believe the position that France has taken in direct opposition against the American position against iraq. Since we first began to study history, we learned that it was France that came to the Colonies' rescue during the American Revolution and assured the 13 Colonies of their independence some 225 years ago. The United States has twice rescued France from the hands of Germany, both in World War I and the Second World War. It has been said that France imports all of its oil and a majority comes from close ties French business- men have with Iraq. I hear that these oil relat- ed businessmen are putting the pressure on the French business leaders to go soft on dealings with Saddam. The fact that Germany and Russia have joined France in opposition to the American stand is no real sur- prise. Since the War of 1812 between the Colonies and England, England has been America's greatest ally. During the War Between the States, both England and France were wise to stay neu- tral. English is the dominant language spoken in America and closer ties exist to the English and the Irish than any other single bloodline. These ties have served to strengthen even further in the last century. When I started high school almost 65 years ago I had to make a decision on a foreign language. I chose French predomg e> nantly because history had taught me great respect for France. Even during World War II, General Charles DeGaule and the free French operat- ing out of North Africa con- tinued to struggle against the Nazi government. LIKE the United States, England, France, Germany and Russia are among the NATO countries that have agreed to a joint effort of defense against any aggres- SOL Even )Arkey, who bly has rrmg0 lose they are located just Iraq, has allowed Nations (Americans to build up in case of the Persian Gulf. AMERICA made take 12 years ago did not finish the job Saddam. Should war again, and it seems a this President Bush believe will finish My bloodlines "Duke's mixture" Americans today. Our English, Irish and descendants, it is the I am most proud. Regardless of our try, America has great melting of all the country we have common with is En "Long live the ( 50 Yea00 Ago i:. ! li In the Hogansville HIGH SCHOOL EXPANSION: Thurston, contractor, is hard at work on high school development, and there will t waiting for approval for the tor who has already built a tool Shed and teron the grounds in preparation to the job. PURINA CATASTROPHE: Checkerboard Feed Store on Commerce suffered an estimated $9,000 in both fire and water Tuesday night as fire{ undetermined origin threatened the block of stores on Commerce." BAh'LING APATHY: A front page al insisted there's 'Nothing wrong with ball." "There is no particular excuse for overwhelming support of the gridiron ors and such absolute lack of support also superior basketball team." The noted that more people had attended a football game than the entire basketball 'q-he only shortcoming we have is with our tators." SHINDIG COMING: 'The .--; .-::-.z.-.- Hogansville branch, is planning big ..."r=---- July Fourth, Tfiis time the boys are raise money in big bundles."