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Manchester, Georgia
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February 22, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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February 22, 2001
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 620-040 A 0rinum tthlh:atimt Millard B. Grimes, Preskleflt M_mE HAI PUBLISHEPJADVERTISING DIRFk.OR JOHN KVYKL&apos;mAt ASSOCIATE PtmtzsrroR BRYAN GElXR AssocIATE EorroR JAVNE BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (700) 846-.:1188, Fax (706) 846-2206 12. O. Box 426 ltogansvine,  30230 Eyeing John Rocker Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein and Iraq continues to be a thorn in the side of America. The conflict between Iraq and the U.S. has been going on years. When things really got out of hand.was during The Gulf War, which you all might remember was not really a war but a conflict, according to his- tory books. The air strike of five mili- tary sites on the outskirts of Baghdad Friday night has been called a self-defense measure by the Pentagon. Officials said the attack was meant to counter Iraqi radar, communications and anti-aircraft defenses that have fired on U.S. and allied air patrols in recent weeks with increasing frequency and accu: racy. They have also called the hit a 'warning." Please, a warning for Saddam Hussein? He doesn't need a warning, he needs a good old fashioned whipping. THE CONFLICT with Iraq will never end as long as Hussein is in power. He has refused to work with the U.S. on every corner, including the nuclear weapons inspections. This country needs to quickly figure out that Hussein will con- tinue to be problem until some thing is done to stop him. The problem with Hussein is that he has no respect for Life other than his own. He will send his soldiers out to die and not even blink an eyelash when making the decision to do so. The word "crazy" comes to mind when one thinks of Hussem. President Bush was right in ordering the air strikes. In recent months, Iraq has been more aggressive in firing anti- aircraft missiles at planes enforcing the no-fly zone imposed at the end of the Gulf War in 1991. However, Hussein does not recognize the no-fly zone and is willing to once again go to war if necessary over something vial. I DO NOT condone war for many reasons. First, I don't want to see U.S. or Iraqi sol- diers, or even more important- ly innocent civilians, die because of crazy man. However, it stands to reason nothing will change and U.S. tax dollars will continue to be spent trying to keep Hussein in check as long as he is in power in Iraq. Maybe the time has come to de- throne him. Rocker Keeping Quiet? wen, it almost baseball time again and the Atlanta Braves are in traimg. The promise of another successful season abounds. Or does it? The Braves have seen many changes since last season, including the loss of The Big Cat and Javy Lopez in the line- up. They will Pave to work hard- er this season, perform as a team and keep their heads on straight ff they 3xct to make the playoffs again. Sometimes, that can seem impossible when you have a controversial play- er like John Rocker on your ros- ter. REPORTS from Florida right now are that Rocker is keeping his mouth shut, work- ing on a split-finger fast ball to replace his change-up, but most importantly appears to be get- ring along with his teammates. It was reported that Rocker and Brian Jordan even gave each other a hug. That's a good start. Rocker told reporters he isn't talking about last year, just the new stuff for this seastm_ If what is beingsald is true, Rocker keeps his temper in check and his teammates keep the attitude they have now, the Braves shouldbe a contender again this seasoh: So, it appears the team of the 90s will begin /lew decade with a new attitude.Qr at least, let's hope so. We gladly welcome letters to the editor/ 'ruE. Hock: H< Ntes is published weekly by the Star-Mercm Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roovelt Highway, MarwJle, Gex>rgia 318 t 6. U S PS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Mcfiwell Counties: $20 a y elwhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansvilte, Georgia 30230. Foa suascmeno call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publk:ations, E O. Box 426. Mancster, Georgia 31816. POSMgYrER: Send  chang to E O. Box 426, Hoganslle, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Asx:iate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Asmcime tor ..............................................................  ................................... Bryan Geter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ......................................  ................................................ Jayne Goidston Staff Wfi ..................................................................... .Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant AsmsIanl Advertising Manager ....................................................................... .Laurie Advertising Sal ....................................................................... : ......................... I.xm Camp Aistant Editor ............ , .................................................................. , .......... .Rob Ri Compcing .................................................. Valinda Ivery,  Smith, Lanm King Lcgals ............................................................................................................ Jae Reeeptit and Classifiects .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Laird Presstm ................................................................ .David Boggs and Wayne Cathowski Commtax O--FFms President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ...... : ................................................................................. Charlot S. Grimes (00pinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVIIA.E HOME NEWS - FEBRUARY 22, 2001 AR E1 + eF ""\\;  I O*11 Hoga Bad Weather, Cows, Golf, crocoallgii! Human pain works its way out of our consciousness over time. There is a season of sadness. A season of anger. A season of tranquility. A sea- son of hope. But seasons do not follow one another in a lockstep manner. At least for those in cri- sis. The winters and springs of one's life are all jumbled togeth- er in a puzzling array. One day we feel as though the dark clouds have lifted, but the next day they have returned. One moment we can smile, but a few hours later the tears emerge. It is true that as we take two steps forward in our life's journey, we may take one or more steps back- ward. But when one has faith that the spring thaw will arrive, the win- ter winds seem to lose some of their punch. Robert Venings wrote the above in his book tiffed "A Gift of Hope." Reading those words, which tell us that if we keep the faith the spring thaw will arrive, reminds me that never before have we experienced such a cold winter, !Geor not to my memory, at least. GROWING UP in Northeast Georgia, I can remember the occa- sional snow, running from the wood heater to jump in a cold bed, wind blowing through cracks in the walls. But back in those days there was no such thing as heat pumps or insulated houses. The weather in some ways seemed colder, but really it wasn't. It was the li,Ang conditions. This winter my small herd of cattle reminds me most every day of just how cold it has been. Each time I step out of the house they begin talking to me with their "moos" that tell me there is hay in the barn and they want some of it. On the very cold days the cows hang around the barn as if it is a three star restaurant, refusing to go out into the pasture to seek any- thing green. SPEAKING OF COWS, a stranger approached a Maine farmer one day and asked him how much he felt his prize cow was worth. The farmer looked at the stranger suspiciously and asked, "Are you the tax assessor or did "On the very cold days the cows hang arw.00d the barn as it is a three star restau- rant..." you just run over my cow?" Most golf course managers will also verify that this winter has been one of the coldest ever exp rienced in this area. They are say- ing that play on their courses has been only a fraction of the usual. You can bet your boots that when the weather is so cold that it keeps golfers off the course, it iSd th, Mitch and I were platy cc one morning in Upstatgh h, Carolina. When we teed otlmt ma below freezing, but there  histc frost, blem q As we approached First green my shot landed on ed frozen lake that surrounttary green. When we got to thor I, I pulled out my ball snatdtnam retrieve the hall. Mitch fight "Why don't you walk outght 1 frozen lake, hit the ball riea a stroke?" My answer of lled. was, no way! .W y Mentioning water remiemb of this story about two m sol+ were about to cross a rive@ as tt they noticed the crocodilesr, but "Are you afraid?" ong e ra asked the other. "Don't y inc that God is merciful and , no "Yes I do," the frighte "l he said. "But what if God su( har chooses right now to be I e f b, the crocodiles?"  ty" la ede IN CLOSING let me nd with a thought for today. # tg ful for your problems. If t rat:. less difficult, someone , the ability might have your r sla, re then Celebrating the Family Ritual of Dea{!00 Nobody ever sent the dying on their way with more fanfare than my mama's family. Aunt Benonia has been dying again now for about two weeks. It's her fourth time, I think... Lynda, my sister, took her keyboard to the foot of the hos- pital bed at efforts number two and three and sung her back to this side both times. Literally. I can't r the details sur- rounding her irn-st dying, but I'm sure they were profound, joy- ful, and so much fun that Aunt Benonia just couldn't leave. Wondering how we do it? First, there has to be forewarn- ing. Something like a doctor say- ing, "He/she is dying. Organs are shutting down It's a matter of hours or days at the most." Now, nobody, to my knowl- edge, ever set out to prove any doctor wrong. We have great respect for those health profes- sionals we choose to help us cam for the bodies in which we live while residing on this side of eternity. WHAT WE DO when told a dying is about to come down is gather round the one who is get- ting ready to pass over. Most members of my family believe the other side is going to be awe- some. There's not a whole lot of fear among us about death and what follows after. And as you will soon understand, the dying is, in m__ny instances, something we all actually ertjoy. For example, with Aunt Benonia's last dying episode, Aunt June came up from Florida. That was several months ago mad Aunt June is staying until the end. With the onset of this dying warning Cousin Maxine came to town. She's here indefinitely now, too. When Aunt Benonia was readmitted to the hospital a cou- ple of weeks ago, the family was called. They rallied. The dying one has not been alone for a moment Most of the thnethere are two to four family members in the room with her. The main waiting room is crawling with more family, and the parking lot ain't void, either. The dying's favorite food is brought to the bedside. His or her favorite songs are sung (softly, of course soas not to dis- turb others down the hall). Jokes are told. Gossip is shared. Memories are resur- rected. All this in the presence of the dying one. It is so much fun that the one who lays there dying just can't leave. They have "come out of it" more times than I can begin to count. Remember, I have a huge family, hundreds of us, counting just all the aunts, uncles, first and second cousins. OF COURSE, eventually it's for real. When the dying one fhmlly has absolutely no strength left, when the final breath is drawn, when all hands have released their grasp, the ded our own passing and t cIn mate family celebratio# e th awaits us. rote H Of course, most of uS The for some degreeofw titu sudden deaths are hardeY w automobile accidents, out t. tt loss ings, fatal heart attacks  + without prior warfting. O tledraC they happen too. Still, w  brate. Maybe the celeb, t to doesn't get to be as lo ed drawn out. And there n an some degree of regret t@ sou , ,; Wifll.4mUSthat}s hol lld b " this world," and lea I late that we don't. 641, I KNOW each and !=--. "q/Ve cry well, too. family has their own wa Just as well as we dealing and coping wit hugh. But not for passing of their loved one I know only too well how p 'j /Og." it can be. Never would I at .,',_ to push my family ritual i," another and I don't meaV "t#_ disrespectful to anyone, t crying commences, pose I am just sharing m[ t We cry well, too. Just as well trations this week becau as we laugh. But not for long. sent circumstances prev Just a few hours, two or three from being there in days at the most. And we all participate in Aunt know without a doubt that we present dying are crying for ourselves Ah, but it's only because the dying ritual]cele- the heart that loves bration is over once more. no barrier, not even THE LOVED ONE who f'mal- ly pulled off his or her exit is sorely missed. No doubt about that. Yet there is some degree of wonder on this side, and a tad of excitement as we think about Response to th/s shou/d be mai/ed to: MJ Holt, PO Box 00o21s Is It Free Speech or Just Filthy America is a great nation. Many people see the foundation of that greatness as lying in dif- ferent aspects of our country. To hear recent popular politi- cians speak, that greatness is in diversity, while others Irmd that greatness in schools' technolo- gy, medical advances and the like. There are others still who f'md America's greatness in her Declaration of Independence, her Constitution, and her Bill of Rights. It is true that these things set America head and shoulders apart from the rest of the world, but I like what French writer Alexis de Tocqueville, after visiting America in 1831, said, "I sought for the greatness of the United States in her commodious har- bors, her ample rivers, her fer- tile fields, and boundless forests-and it was not there. I sought for it in her rich mines, her vist world commerce, her public school system, and in her institutions of higher learning- -and it was not there. I looked for it in her democratic Congress and her matchless Constitution-and it was not there. Not until I went into the churches of America and heard her pulpits flame with right- eousness did I understand the secret of her genius and power. America is great because America is good, and if America ever ceases to be good, America will cease to be great!" That is a message that needs to once again be heard from our pulpits. America is being inundated with a constant flow of frith from pornographic cesspools. Someone has made the state- ment, "Not since Manhattan Island was sold for $24.00 has so much dirt been available for so little money as today." These proponents of pornog- raphy claim free speech as their right to promote their pervert- ed pictures. If our forefathers saw what is done in the name of free speech I honestly believe they would shudder in horror. The First Amendment does not guarantee totally free speech. For you see, a person cannot slander someone without being held accountable, nor can you liable someone without being prosecuted. A person cannot yell "fire" in a crowded build- ing nor can something be false- ly advertised. Even the use of certain speech can be limited if it is proven that the speech incites violence. Speech is free as long as it does not bring harm to another. May I submit to you that the wickedness that is sold even in our local stores and bleeds through our own cable TV is not free speech but filthy smut. Pornography is not a harmless pastime but a terrible cancer that is spreading throughout our country. It is not free speech because it is harmful. To those that say let people do their own thing and we shouldn't interfere may I ask a question? If a restaurant was selling contaminated meat should something be done to stop it or should that business be allowed to continue? The point is that America has been sold a bill of goods telling them that pornography isn't harmful Proverbs 14:34 says, "Righteousness nation: but sin is a any people." PORNOGRAPHY is ful because it is a the way God intended be between a husband wife. Whether it label of hardcore or homosexuality or bestiality or marital sex or forms of destructive. destroys families, women, defiles deters the of the husband and Pornography will pie personally, it will people psychologically, destroy people destroy people it will destroy people ly. There are verted organizations destroy the very moral of this country. For Los Angeles there is the Guyon Society whose says, "Sex it's have no religious be cited as to the nature or pornography.