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February 24, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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February 24, 2000
 

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OPINION ii, i PAGE 4 - HOGANSVK/ HOME NEWS - FEBRUARY 24, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A Grimes Publication MIIlard B. Grimes, President USPS 62O-O4O MIKE Ha PUBLISH]m/ADdinG DmECroa JOHN KUYKENWa.L ASSOCTE PUBLtSrmR/EDrroR BRYAN GETER ASSOCIATE EDrmR JarNE N Busm-tss MANAGER Phone (706)846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O, Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 O,:ial legal Organ, City of Hoganwille A Presidential HistoryLesson In a recent survey, historians judged the leadership qualities of all the presidents of the United States and Abraham Lincoln was chosen number one. He was followed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, George Washington, Teddy Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman. George Bush was tapped as 20th, Bill Clinton as 21th, Jimmy Carter as 22th and Richard Nixon as 25th. Lincoln was the 15th President of the United States. He served from 1861-1865. During his administration, the Homestead Act was approved in 1862; also the same year Legal Tender gave the U.S. a national currency. In 1863 the Battle of Gettysburg occurred along with Vicksburg, Mississippi surren- dered to Grant and during the same year Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg Address. In 1864 Sherman captured Atlanta, followed by the surren- der of General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia in 1865. The same year Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth at Ford's Theatre in Washington D.C. Lincoln was 52 years old when he was inaugurated in 1861. His nickname was 'Honest Abe'. Lincoln's favorite pets were Fido and Jip, his dogs, Jack his turkey, Nanny and Nanko, Tad Lincoln's goats. Lincoln also had a white pet rabbit, a pig, ponies and cats. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the survey's second choice. He was the 32rid President of the United States being elected in 1933-1945. His "New Deal" included the CCC, FCA, NIRA, NLB, FDIC and TVA programs. In 1933 the 21st Amendment to the Constitution repealed Prohibition. In 1935 the Social Security Act was enacted and in 1938 the Fair Labor Standards Act was enacted. Germany invaded Poland in 1939 which began World War II. Then in 1941, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and the U.S. Entered World War II. In 1942, U.S. Marines invad- ed Guadacanal and in 1944 D-Day invasion of Europe occurred. The Yalta Conference was held in 1945 and the same year Roosevelt died in office in Warm Springs. His last words were, "I have a terrific headache." Roosevelt favorite sport and hobby was medicine ball and his favorite pets were his dogs, Fala, Blaze, Major, Meggie, Winks, Tiny and President. George Washington was tapped as third greatest presi- dent in leadership. He was served from1789-1797. He is known bymany as the "Father of Our County." Washington was inaugurated at the age of 57. He was born February 22. 1732 and died on December 14, 1799 at the age of 67. The cause of death was pneu- monia and his last words were "It is well." He enjoyed his stallions, Samson, Steady, Leonidas, Traveler, magnolia, Nelson, Bluesman, Mopey, Taster, Tippler, Forester, Captain, Lady Rover, and Rozinante. Washington also had hounds which he enjoyed. They were Vulcan, Sweetlips, and Searcher. Some significant events dur- ing his term include the estab- lishment of the Departments of State, War, and Treasury, creat- ed by Congress in 1789. Also in the same year, the Bill of Rights- "Roosevelt died in office in Warm Springs. His last words were, "I have a terrific headache." first ten Amendments to the Constitution was passed. In 1790, the U.S. Supreme Court held its first session. In 1791 the United States Bank was established in Philadelphia. In 1798 the Department of the Navy and the Marine Corps were created. In 1800, the seat of gov- ernment was moved from Philadelphia to Washington D.C. Theodore Roosevelt, known as "TR", "Trust-Buster" or "Teddy" was elected the 26th President of the United States in 1901. He was not quite 43 years old when elected, the youngest President in the nation's history. Roosevelt graduated from Harvard College. He was a lawyer, author and public official. He was married twice and had six children. He was of the Dutch Reformed religion and affiliated with the Republican Party. He was born in New York in 1858 and died in New York in 1919 of Inflammatory rheumatism. His last words were, "Please put out the light." During Roosevelt's presiden- cy, the Department of Commerce and Labor were created. The Meat Inspection Act and Pure Food and Drug Act passed by Congress in 1906. His favorite pets were hors- es, dogs, cats, snakes guina pigs, a lion, hyena, wildcat, coyote, five bears, racoon, roosters and zebra. He enjoyed riding, swimming and walking. Harry S. Truman was elected as the 33rd President of the United States at the age of 60 in 194S. He died in 1972 at the age of 88 due to lung congestion. The Department of Health, Education and Welfare was cre- ated during his presidency in 1953. In 1946 the Atomic Energy Commission was created and in 1949 the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was formed. Truman enjoyed sailing, stamp collecting, swimming and playing with his two dogs Feller and Mike. No Stranger to Suffe ring Well, now this is written on the 22nd which is truly a great day that some people overlook. This day falls halfway between the winter solstice and spring equinox and has been celebrat- ed for centuries as Ground Hog Day. Old Ground Hog has been sleeping peacefully in his den and on this day, feeling a little cramped decides to take a lit- tle stroll. Now a Ground Hog doesn't have a lot of nerve. If you say "boo" at a Ground Hog he will head for tall timbers and he or she even sees its shadow it will go back to its warm den and sleep for six more weeks and we will have six more weeks of winter which no one wants, but if he stays out we may feel sure that winter is nearly over and we can start spring plowing. Now I went out and could- n't see my shadow and if I could- n't see my shadow I'm pretty sure neither could the Ground Hog. So you see what we owe the old boy. We should fly flags, sing Ground Hog songs and cel- ebrate all over the place. If it snows tomorrow forget all this and blame the Ground Hog. Now February is a famous month even if the Ground Hog skeedaddles to Heard County. Many famous people, and some not so famous were born during February. One of the most famous was me in 191S. I read in my Bible the follow- hag: Psalm 90:10 "The days of our yearn are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labor and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away." Well I'm not sure what the last part means but on the 13th if I live and do I will-have have reached the threescore and ten. I do hope I make at last some of the fourscore for I am by no means ready to fly away. My friend and our representative, Crawford Ware, joins the three- "I do hope I make at last some of the fourscore for I am by no means ready to fly away". score and ten club today (the 2nd). If anybody sees him fly- ing around please let me know which way he went. Altho' she joined the club several years ago, our neigh- bor, Mrs. Christine Stone is cel- ebrating her birthday today. She and Howard are the best neighbors anyone could hope for. Since I was born on the 13th many have missed being Others being a much. You perhaps between.  While I havel.' the wife read me books. read River", by sequel to his Horsemen". he has a Raleigh, end l "I am no stran Looking back growing up, great into my seco working long ye tile company, li WWII and being 1 threescore and believe I earl sa! Raleigh, "I am suffering." bletl Studying the South's P:verty (Another in a series) absentee ownerships  " e carpenter ,. In early 1938, Roosevelt was 1925], he would approached by Clark Foreman, an adviser to Secretary Ickes, who was paid by the Rosenwald Fund, with the proposal that a spe- cial study of the South woldd draw attention to conditions there and their implication for the nation. Roosevelt agreed and assigned the project to the National Emergency Council, an old New Deal coordination agency. The NEC convened some southerners in federal service for the study. Roosevelt set the tone in advance by saying he believed the South had become "the nation's number one economic problem" - the nation's problem, not merely the South's. '%Ve have an economic unbalafice in the nation as a whole, due to this very condition of the South. It is an unbalance that can and must be righted for the sake of the South and of the nation," the President said. - In August the NEC produced a synopsis of the views of some of the most thoughtful academic students of the South's plight - Rupert Vance and Howard Odum of the University of North Carolina and Walter Prescott Webb of the Um'versity of Texas. It blamed the South's sad state on national tariff policy, discrimina- tory freight rates, monopoly and THE REPORT HAD a strange result. Most southerners who took note of it were more upset at what they regarded as criti- cism of the region, rather than at the northern exploitation that was the dear target of the scholars and Roosevelt. As a political doc- ument, it was too abstract. For Roosevelt, abstract think- ing dovetailed with his common sense and desire to see the depressed South rise again. And not just rise again - but rejoin the rest of the nation as a full part- ner, economically, emotionally and intellectually. The South had long suffered because of discriminatory freight rates; nonsouthern man- ufacturers found it attractive to take the region's natural resources out of the South for con- version into consumer items. This tended to keep the South a non- industrialized region. Roosevelt joined with southern advocates of national freight-rate structure that would tend to encourage industrial users of southern raw materials to build their plants (thus create well-paying jobs) in the South near those natural reSOurceS. HE THOUGHT a strong fed- eral government was the best "We have an eco- nomic unbalance in the nation as a whole, ... It is an unbalance that can and must be righted for the sake of the South and of the nation..." instrument for bringing the South back into the nation. If there were no centralized planning at the national government level, he told a group of visiting British management and labor special- ists once, whatever progress that had been made in reducing sec- tional differences in the American economy would not have been possible. "I have a place down South," he said. "The whole standard is entirely different... A first-class two and a half doll was above the s lucky. He was a I our village, he we lionalre if he [mad and fifty dollars a y efforts had raise Georgia and nar he said. i THAT WAS II fact, sectional difl far from ended.  That year, 1 President, made ment to persuade nation to provide of aid to the poor New York didn't nJ for schools but Federal funds fol an idea that was re$ advanced at tM Roosevelt had bee "The state[s] not to have eral government Georgia and Alabama, South Arktnsas, I think values dowI and run them," he s (Next week: R# at Auburn.) The "Bubba" St,0000reotype For years I have attempted to enlighten those individuals who hold biased and ill-based opinions about the name 'Bubba." Most think men named Bubba are nothing more than ignorant swine who wear caps with the names of heavy-equip- ment dealers on the front, shoot anything that moves, listen to music about doing bodily harm to hippies, and put beer on their grits. There may be Bubbas who fit the above description, but there are plenty who don't. Earlier, I wrote of a man - college educated, with no tobac- co juice stains on his teeth - T HOCANSVna HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of C_aimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by marl: $15 in Meriwefller, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second dass postage paid at Hogansville, Geccgia 30230. FOR stncmFrloNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester,  31816. POSIMASTI: Send address changes to R O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associale Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykeadall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Business Maaager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant AdveTdsing Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester y ............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Comping ............................................................................. Valinda lvery, Deborah Smith Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda Ivery Receplionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ........................................................................................ _Roland Foiles Pressroom ......................... . ....................................... David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski CommT Oncs Presidmat ................................................................................................... .Millard B. Grimes Vice President ....................................................................................... Charlotte S. Cain Secretary ............................................................................................... Laura C, rin Corer Tiastner .............................................................................................. Kathy Cain Ganett Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. whose family had always referred to him as Bubba. "I got that name," he explained, 'oecause my baby sister couldn't say brother. She called me Bubb&" The man's problem was that he had taken a job with some sort of high tech corporation, and his boss insisted he drop the name Bubba because he felt clients wouldn't respect a man with such a name. Our Bubba refused to use any other name, however, and become quite successful with his new company and wound up with his former boss's job. The former boss now refers to his old employee as "Mr. Bubba." Anyway, I happened to pick up a back issue of Southerner magazine recently, and on the very front cover were the fol- lowing words: Bubba! You don't have to be dumb, mean, fat, slow white or male to be oneP I turned to page 37 and began to read: "Of all the Southern stereo- types," the story began, 'he one that answers to 'Bubba' is prob- ably the least flattering." The article went on to do portraits of eight Bubbas. Do any of the following fit the typ- ical "Bubba" stereotype? Keith (Bubba) Taniguchi: Attorney, Austin, Texas. Fullblooded Japanese. Into Zen. John (Bubba) Trotman: State director of the USDA's "Bubba! You don't have to be dumb, mean, fat, slow white or male to be one!" Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service, Montgomery, Alabama. On peo- ple moving into Alabama: "At first, they say, "Alabama, that's Tobacco Road. Then, you can't blow them out of Alabama with a cannon." Efula (Bubba) Johnson: Narcotics officer, Savannah, Georgia. Mr. Johnson is a large black man, and he carries a large gun. Walter (Bubba) Smith: Minister, Ashdown, Arkansas. Claims no relation to Bubba Smith of football and beer com- mercial fame. James (Bubba) Arm- strong: Surgeon, Montgomery, Alabama. Careful poking fun at anybody who knows his way around a scalpel. Paula (Bubba) Meiner: Owns a barbecue joint in Winter Park, Florida. Nice lady. Bernard (Bubba) Meng, III: State administrator for U.S. Senator ErneS Columbia, South C 'ttle Bubba." D etc.. Kyle (Bubll Elementary sole0 Auburntown, Tea wants to be a basl when he grows uP One more University of G nary school rece the state's first te Holstein bull wei# dred pounds. They named What else? By special i with his widow, i Home News is c ed columns by th Grizzard, who gr by Moreland, and  most widely read of his time. 1 Grizzard belO America but he belonged to this arg of which he urrot l where a portion Newnan to Ho named in his ho Grizzard Museu ! lished in Morelandi a '/t/ng and edit/ dedicated to his ra beloved UniversitY Grizzard's boOl are still availab through Bad Boot l P.O. Box 191266, 31118-1266 and music stores natid