"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
February 27, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 27, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A (&ime uhlkatizm Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE HALE PUBLISHER/ADVFATISING Dm, ECrOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOWN BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansvind, Georgia 30230 Be Careful and Don't Put Your Eyes Out... The other day I had to stop by a local auto parts store to pick up a tail light for my truck. While there, a woman was speaking with the man at the counter about pur- chasing oil. It seems her hus- band had asked her to buy it and she wasn't sure what kind Her young son, about five or six, was being a typi- cal child and picking up things, moving things, etc. "Put that down," the woman told her son. "You don't know what's in that bottle. It could be chemical and you'll get it on your hands, rub your eyes and put them out." It has to be a mother thing. I don't understand why moth- ers think everything you do or touch is going to harm you in some way or put you eye out. My morn was the same way. I don't know how many times I was reminded in my youth that I would put my eyes out. If I was watching televi- sion and she thought I was sitting too close, she'd always say, "Don't sit so close to the television. That thing will put your eyes outY ....... Of course, I don't think I know of a single person that has gone blind for watching television. Now, if she had said, "Quit watching that thing, it'll warp your mind," that would have been an entirely different matter. Come to think of it, too much television as a child might be what's wrong with me today. Anyway, as I was saying, I don't know how many things in my life my mother thought would put my eyes out, but there were a number of them. Like all young boys, I loved to shoot my BB gun. Everytime I got the thing out, I knew what was coming... "Be careful with that thing. You could shoot someone's eye out or even your own." My cousins and I liked to play fight: sometimeswe'd battle with sticks for swords, "'Don't play with those sticks, you'll put someone's eye out." Of course, if I wasn't put- ring my eye out, I was going to hurt myself or someone else. "Quit that tussling, you're gonna hurt yourself or some- one else." "Get out of that tree, you're gonna fall and hurt yourself." "Don't play tackle foot. ball, someone's gonna get hurt." The list could go on and on. It's a simple fact: moth- ers are just overly protective. Now, I'm not saying there is not some validity in their con- cerns, but boys will be boys. Right? WELL, IT'S FUNNY, but I can understand that young mother's concerns better today than I did that day in the store. My darling daughter, that I love so much, brought her rabbit to visit recently. When she cleaned the cage, she used my kRchen sink and some of the wood chips from the cage must have gotten into the sink and stopped it up. So, I got out the drain opener, determined to unclog the drain. The bottle plainly said, avoid splashing, wear pro- tection on hands, avoid con- tact with skin. I heeded that advice about as well as I used to heed my mother's. I picked up the bottle and began to pour. Some of the chemical got on my hand, but I didn't real- ly think about it much. While waiting for the drain opener to work, I went about my other duties around the house. Unfortunately, at some point I went to wipe a little sweat from my forehead and I guess the chemical on my hand got into it and it rolled down into my eye. I can't begin to tell you how bad that hurt. The bot- tle said to rinse your skin water, in case of contact with eyes.., flush immediately. I raced to the shower, held my eye open and let the cool water run into it for several minutes. Finally, the f)ain stopped. My eye was soar and the vision was a little distort- ed for a few hours, but ! man- aged to survive the incident without putting my eye out. I guess morns really do know what they're talking about and I guess their con- cerns are valid. So from now on, when I hear a morn tell a child, "Don't do that, you'll put your eye out," I know those are not just words they are saying.., you really can put your eye out if you're careless. So, stop reading this col- umn without your glasses, because I don't want you to put your eyes out. Have a great week. THE H(X;ANSVILI,E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Rcxsevelt Highway. Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-(M0. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical tx)stage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. Foa SU'RtPI"It)NS call (706) 846-3188 or wn'le to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POST,S-rER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Asscg'iate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Comix)sing .................................................................. Valinda lvery, Dewayne Flowers I,egah ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager. .................................................................................... Judy Crews Production Manager ............................................................................ Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Gnx:howski Pressroom ........................................... Damell McCauley. Joey Knight. Lany Colleges COMTE Of'FI CEgg President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Gdmes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counl and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - FEB. 27, 2003 it. ! Th ttanty nce Willie r 00elson at the White Houf'i00! Vis Written in 1978 WASHINGTON-- People wearing bags over their heads and carrying signs that screamed about "massacres" in their native Iran paraded in front of the White House Wednesday evening. To the north of the city at Camp David, three powerful leaders of three powerful nations struggled to find a way to bring peace to anoth- er troubled land. The papers were filled with stories of death and destruction in Nicaragua, and half the world is on strike. But the night was clear and cool and the moon was full and bright in Washington on Wednesday. And out on the south lawn of the White House, a million miles from everything else, a bearded man wearing a red bandana took a long pull from a wine bottle and commenced to sing. He sang 'Whiskey River" first; then he sang "Crazy" and "Amazing Grace" and "Georgia" and something called" Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain." As he sang "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain" I had geous one, but at least worth a moment of consideration. Jimmy Carter didn't make his own party Wednesday night, the one he threw to honor stockcar driv- ers. His wife announced to the crowd "only something the magnitude of the summit talks would have kept him away." HE MADE a mistake by not coming. And he made a mistake by not bringing Egypt's Sadat and Israel's Begin with him. Sit the two of them down together in front of Willie Nelson, I thought. Bring the people with bags over their heads inside, too. Give them all a cold beer and let them listen to Willie Nelson. After Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain," who would still want to fight? Wednesday night was Jimmy Carter fulfilling a promise. When he was gov- ernor of Georgia, he made it an annual practice to host stockcar drivers and even sportswriters to the mansion on West Paces Ferry. You know about stockcar racing. Stockcar racing isn't Watkins Glen or spiffy gen- Ferraris. It is Talladega and Daytona and Atlanta International Raceway and beer and fried chicken and a punch in the nose because you said a Chevrolet can whip a Dodge or, worse, you insult- ed the glorious memory of Fireball Roberts. "Jimmy told us if he ever got to be President," explained driver David Pearson, "we would share in some of the glory. Here we are ." And there they were.. Pearson, Petty, Waldrip, Yarborough and Bill France, the head kabolla of stockcar racing. And even some sportswriters and evenBilly Carter and especially llie Nelson. THE WASHINGTON papers the next day didn't quite know what to make of prove we are under th En of a populist presidea-ch went into great deta  Fo cerning the Carters' 1tl (7C stockcar racing Fu explained stockcar I grew in the South earlier preoccupati running moonshine, i! "I ain't never rug[ shine," Richard Pet reporter, but I don[_ about thee rest of r := ly." De. What ha As Wednesday night at tillel of the president of thhyn States was a large gawl mostly Southern peWl together in the backYyt i a picnic and to liste Ot of their own sing hisarh dana off. Andy JackN W, to give the same kindt: 45 ties here; he wound M $20 bill. hi, s( We RY SPECIAL tRRa th.. WITH ltlS qDOW,1)ED, x2 I  V NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LA Ill( GRIZZARD .... WIIO ('REW LrP| "[h BY MORELAND, AND BEC i-, MOST WIDELY REAl)  lXe WRITER OF HIS TIME. GOm ] BOOKS AND TAPES ARE S'lr St e ABLEFORSALETHROUGH- ,,, o tu ,qPRODUCTIONS, P.(I. BO ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 Sat BOOK AND MUSIC S'I'ORESr of a thought, probably an outra- tlemen in sleek Porches and the affam The said it did WIDE. i Th nda - e yt Oftentimes we hear abut opinion and let a Muslim and apparently some born this motto because CP hta! the good old days, days when life was slower and simpler. I for one will vote for slow- er and simpler days, but.to go back to the horse and buggy, buildings without indoor plumbing, or air conditioning may be a bit too simple. Nevertheless, we live in a wonderful world. Although re may be an abundance of problems, God has still blessed us. We live in an age of tech- nology where things were only idealized many years ago. As I sit here and tYpe this on my computer, I am thank- ful for all that God has let us accomplish. Today in our technologi- cal age, we have e-mail, mail that comes to us electronical- ly via computers. woman have her picture on her driver's license with her face covered this is an edito- rial written by an American citizen, published in a Tampa newspaper. He did quite a job, didn't he? Read on, please! IMMIGRANTS, NOT AMERICANS .... MUST ADAPT. I  am tired of this nation worryingabout whether we are offending some individual or their cul- ture. Since the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, we have experienced a surge in patri- otism by the majority of Americans. However, the dust from the attacks had barely settled when the "politically correct" crowd began complaining about the possibility that our patriotism was offending oth- ers. I am not against immi- gration, nor do I hold a grudge against anyone who is seek- ing a better life by coming to America. Our population is almost entirely made up of descendants of immigrants. However, there are a few things that those who have recently come to our country, THE OTHER DAY I received an e-mail from one of my church members, who is a teacher here in town. I would like to once again pass along to you something that was sent to me. Read it slow, and let it sink in. Here it is: After hearing that the state of Florida changed its here, need to understand. This idea of America being a multicultural community has served only to dilute our sov- ereignty and our national identity As Americans, we have our own culture, our own society, our own language and our own lifestyle. This cul- ture has been developed over centuries of struggle, trials, and victories by millions of men and women who have sought freedom WE SPEAK English, not Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, or any other language. Therefore, if you wish to become part of our society, learn the language! " "In God We Trust" is our national motto. This is not some Christian, right wing, political slogan. We adopted gt,, {figaatt00uilie 00fi, eralll ansville Wins T ourna 50, Years Ago... men and women, on C If, - Jennie principles, rounu =_- " urc nation, and thin m cle n umented. It is c appropriate to disp] the walls of our scl God offends you, gest you consider part of the world as home, because our culture. } If Stars and  offend you, or you d Uncle Sam, then yo seriously consider a another part of this I I1 We are happy with  11 ture and have no d change, and we real care how you did where you came fro(i_ This is OUR COU{ our land, and our li{ eOvUr First Amendm cry citizen the express his opinion will allow you everyi: tunity to do so. But o are done complainin ing, and griping abO flag, our pledge, our! ----- al motto, or our way 0 highly encourage y0 advantage of one otM American freedo RIGHT TO LEAVE. tt In the Hogansville Hert Predecessor to the Hogansville Nor# TOURNAMENT WINNERS: Hogansville Green Wave basketeers of Reese Slaughter controlled the rebound the game almost all night against a highl ed Manchester quintet to win the.W, Division championship 60-38, and the r meet the Eastern Division winners at Jal Friday night." BIGGEST WHISKEY HAUL IN "A load of contraband whiskey with a $19,112 carried in a trailer truck valued than $20,000 was stopped by Sheriff L.W. I and his men at West Point, Ga. headi! LaGrange and points north on the ni, 5, 1953._" TURKEY DINNERS: "Although Ch and Thanksgiving come only once a Hogansville school children are enjoying dinners nearly every week this year." NEW CHIEF: "The new manager Farmer's Supply Store in Hogansville Fincher. He took over the managership lasfl and is now doing business at the new Supply Iocatior on Commerce Street." CAPITALISM AT WORK: 'You will I bly be able to get any kind of automobil want this year, maybe at a reduced price,[ t2