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Manchester, Georgia
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February 28, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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February 28, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 620-o40 A (rimen @litimt Millard B. Gdmes, MI HAI PUB12SIIFq/AI) VERT-ISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLfmmR/EDrrOR , ROB RICHARDSON ASSLSTANT EDITOR JAYNE (N BUSINESS 1VIANAGER Phone (706) 846.3188. Fax (706) 846-22(16 P. O. Box 426 ttogansville, Georgia 30230 It's Time to Get Tough on Crime It's time to get tough on criminals. Recent headlines of area newspaper show just how little regard some peo- ple have for human life today. The City of Phenix City hds really had its share of interesting criminal cases over the years. I should know after spending a few years as General Manger of the news- paper there. The old newspa- pers are filled with story after story of criminal activ- ity, murder and mayhem. There were a few inter- esting cases during my days there as well. I once ducked bullets along with Phenix City's finest police officers one day, when a man became violent and began shooting at everything that moved along his street. He had enough fire power to barricade himself in for days, but the Phenix City Police Department and the Russell County Sheriff's Department was not about to let that happen. The man finally had to be shot to end the standoff. He had no regard for his life or anyone else's for that matter. ITSMS that each neW case that develops there is a little worse than the one before. Last week, I was shocked as I'm sure every- one else was, to read about the three people murdered for money. What makes this case so sickening is the slay- ing of a 12-year-old boy. I can't imagine what that father must be going through. He had to watch as intruders entered his home, abducted himself and his son at gun point, shot and killed his son, slit his throat in an attempt to take his life and then buried them both in a shallow grave dug earlier that day. As a father, I can not imagine the pain of such a loss. I'm sure if the intruders wanted money, the father would have given them all he had to keep his son alive. This is not just a tragedy for the family, but mankindas well. It goes to show just how lit- tle we value human life today. It seems we treasure money and personal possessions more today than human life. Three men are in custody in this case. If it is proven they did kill the young boy and other couple that was robbed and murdered, they should not be given life in prison, they should not be given a lethal injection, they should not die in the electric chair. They should be placed on a wall, not given a blind fold, put a firing squad in front of them and give the command to fire. Maybe then, they will realize how terrified that young boy must have been when they shot and killed him. I'M AM OF the firm believe that we, as a nation, have become too soft on crim- inals. Our jarls and prisons are overcrowded and there is a good reason for it. My father always told me that once a man lowers his morals it becomes easier to lower them a little more and then a little more, until one day he has none. In my opin- ion, that is what is happening in our prison system today. There was a time when a man feared going to prison. He would be working on the chain-gang. He would be placed in a little tiny ceU, fed whatever, and work all day long. He could be visited once a month or so, but that was about all the contact he had with the outside world. Today, every prison has a gym, so the inmates can work out daily. They have televi- sions to watch and can even earn college degrees. We call this rehabilitation. We are trying to turn them into bet- ter citizens. THIS IS KIND of like sending a child to his room today. When we were grow- ing up and got sent to our room, there were only a few things to do. We could play cards, read a book or play with a Matchbox ear. Today, most kids have a computer with internet access, Playstations, stereos, and Lord knows What else in their rooms. As a matter of fact, most kids would probably rather be in their room. While prison is not quite the same as sending a child to his or her room, it's pret- ty comfortable today. I am of the firm believe that the only way we are going to reduce crime in our nation today, is to make the penal- ties for doing crime more severe and making a prison exactly.that. I believe that as long as we're soft on criminal activ- ity, we will continue to be shocked more and more by just how horrffie some crimes can be. THE HOGANSVILLE Holm NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31"816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Froup, Harris or Meriwether Counti: $26 a year elsewhere, Prices include all les tax. Periodical e paid at Hogansville, Georgia :230. FOR sutcmr'no. call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publicationos, P. O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. Pt,TM'TER: Send addr-s changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STraY Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ....... ,...:,.. ........................................... John Kuykendall Bttsinegs Manager ..................................  ............................................. Jayne Goldston Assis "rant Editor ...................................................................................... RobRichardson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertish'lg Sal ........ 2 .............................................................................. .LilKla Lester Composing ................................................................. Dewayne Flowers, Valinda Ivery Legals ............................................................................................... :...... Jayae C_ds[tm Pressman: ......................................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressrann .......................................................................... David Boggs, Larry Caleges Coaroix  President ............................................................. ; .............................. A4illa,d B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Secretary ......................................................................................... .Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Griraes r PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE QME NEWS - FEB. 28, 2002 Enjoying Breakfast With a K" For years I have put up with modern-day nutrition- ists telling me what I can or cannot put into my stomach- At one time or other, I've sworn off red meat, eggs, bacon, sugar and all sortg of other things I enjoy eating. If we listen to health-food advice, all we would be allowed to put in our stom- achs would be something ani- mals graze on, bee pollen and various sorts of bran. I don't know about any- body else, but eating a diet like that probably would make it necessary to spend a great deal of time in the bath- room, and I've got other things to do. Anyway, I have put up with the nutritionists -- As I would any other do-gooders -- but now they have gotten personal. In case you missed it, the Coca- Cola Company is out with a campaign suggesting you drink Coke at breakfast. They might as well have suggested along with your Coke you start the da with two Twinkies, a Little Debbie Snack Cake and a Tootsie Roll. Various nutrition experts expressed shock and dismay (not to be confused with the rock group of the same name) at the thought that Americans might do something so ill- advised as chase down break- fast with a soft drink. "Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially for children," said one so-called food expert. "Coca-Cola should be more responsible and not suggest Americans start their day on a poor nutritional note." Horsefeathers and grape nuts! I've been drinking Coke for breakfast for years. In Russia I couldn't find a Coke, so I drank a Pepsi, warm. I'd saved what little ice I could find for the vodka. I'll admit I'm no health specimen, but I don't think I'd be in this good a shape without my Coke in the morning. You know how most of us feel when we get up -- groggy and sluggish, ill- tempered, slack-eyed, and loop-legged. I might start with a cup of coffee, but all that usually does for me id get one of my eyes open and start a fire in a region just behind my navel. But a Coke. It goes down smoothly. It puts out the fire. It refreshes -- and bring on the day, I think I can make one more. I began drinking Coke for breakfast some 20 years ago when I had a job that demanded I be at work at 5:30 in the morning. That was when you could still find Coke in those little six-ounce bottles, as the Lord intended. I would start each day with a couple of those little Cokes, and if anybody had taken them away from me, I would have been a complete failure at my job and my career would have been ruined. One more think, as a Southerner, I simply must stand fast against anybody who would want to take Coke, with its roots planted deeply in the South, away from me in the morning. Give them Coke and, perish the grits could be next. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LEWIS GRIZZARD, GREW UP IN MORELAND, AND THE MOST WIDELY GEORGIA WRITER OF TIME. TO ALL AMERICA BUTi PARTICULARLY TO THIS AREA OF OF WHICH HE WROTE OFTEN, AND WHERE A TION OF 1-8,5 FROM TO HOGANSVILLE IN HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM ESTABLISHED IN IN 1996, AND A WRITING t EDITING LAB IS ICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED OF AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. 191266, ATLANTA, GA 1266 AND AT BOOK MUSIC STORF 'Yes, Jesus Loves Me' Always Someone has made the statement, "Man has two great needs, to be loved and to have someone to love." There is a lot of truth to that statement, in that man is in great need of love and to love. There are those who have ended their life because they felt as if no one really cared for them. Not long ago, I read a' story of a young teenager who was about to end his life because he felt that his dad did not love him anymore. Fortunately, that tragedy was averted; however, there are still many who never are assured that they are loved. Someone may be reading this little article now wondering if anybody in this world actu- ally cares about them. Well, may I tell you that I have some good news for you. You are loved and you do have some- one to share your love with- Several Sundays ago, the morning message was a man's feeble effort to try to tell a congregation of people that God really loves them. During the course of that message we as a church fam- fly found several things about God's love for us. I must warn you, however, the things are not new nor are they deeply profound. But, they are truths that we need to be reminded of now and again. The first thing we found was "the demonstration proving God's love." We all know that it is one thing to tell someone that we love them, but it is quite another thing to show that someone we love them. We read in Jeremiah, "The Lord hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yes, I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with loving kind- ness have I drawn thee." All through scripture we are told that God loves us. Be that as it may, there are some who look at the present world con- dition and cast a shadow of doubt upon the statements of scripture. Things such as world hunger, violence, child abuse, war, disease and a host of other things are used by Satan to bring doubt into the minds of people. To those doubts, may we once again look to the Bible. First our attention is called to John 3:16, which says, 'Tor God so loved the World, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Again we read in 2 Corinthians 5:14- 15, "For the loveof Christ con- straineth us; because we thus judge, that if one died for aLl, then were all dead; and that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them, and rose again." Not only do these scriptures remind us that God loves us, but these vers- es also provide evidence proves God loves us. greatest evidence of love is the cross of On the cross Jesus bled and died not for wrongdoing of his for the sins of the world. That is what love of God so man chose to rebe a God, yet God made a make Although man had no nor love for God, God loved man. In the love of we see true love ed. Many love others of what those others give them in return. love is a love that when there is no res back, that is thlove Christ demonstrated cross of Calvary. In conclusion, reminded of what John said in his gospel, (. 15:13) "Greater love man than this, that a down his life for his The Search for a Better It is understandable that parents, educators, local lead- ers, and even state politicians are expressing concerns over student test scores and schools placing standards so low that schools can avoid the cutoff if as few as three of 10 students pass exams. This is ridiculous! How in the world does any system, whether it be local or state, conclude they could raise educational levels in an indi- vidual school or system by lowering requirements or standards. The State Department of Education has intimated results from the Criterion Referenced Competency Test will be used to test grade schools beginning in 2004. Grades given to scbools and classes will determine teacher bonuses and amount of said bonus. If student test scores are low enough, teach- ers will be dismissed. This could make a teacher think twice before giving a student a failing grade. Most teach- ers I know want no part in such a school system. Most everyone agrees something must be done, but we must be careful not to throw the baby out with the bath water. No one knows bet- ter than I how important good teachers are, but there are several other comes of things that affect a child's learning abiliW fully as much as a teacher. Earlier this week, I lis- tened to Valley Parmership's Skip Teaster and his presen- tation of how the school sys- tem relates to the effective- ness of attracting industry. Teaster pointed out the cor- relation of a family's eco- nomic status and learning ability and test scores chil- dren from these families pro- duce. Certainly we cannot walt until the economic figures in an area or school district reach the desired level before attacking this learning prob- lem. Neither do I think it wise to place the blame on teach- ers whose students come from underprivileged homes and dismiss them from their jobs. I'm afraid their succes- sors will fair little better. This doesn mean to stay with the "status quo." We should be concerned and work toward improvements in our educational system by attacking weak spots in our educational system. We have come a long way over the past years. Whether we like to admit it or not, the lunchroom program at school for breakfast and lunch has served to help level the play- ing field. Lowering the standard is certainly not the way. It may improve the number of stu- dents tbat pass, but what have you got? Many of you may remem- ber when some high schools and colleges graded on the "curve." I remember how I disliked this system at Georgia back in the late Forties. This system as I remember gave an A+ to the top 10% and an F to the bot- tom 10%, no matter what you scored. Those that scored well on the test were happy. Even some that scored poor- ly were happy anytime the vast majority scored low on a test because they knew only 10% would fail. I remember Dr. Bocock commenting on using the curve in med school with this statement. "I sure hope the doctor that answers the call to my sick mother's bedside is not one that was passed when he barely made the top 90O," Lowering standards to allow a student to pass is much the same. There is no way I would approve this manner of either lowering the standard or setting a certain percentage of a class or group to pass. State School Superintendent Linda Schrenko is at odds with Governor Barnes' plan to upgrade Georgit test scores, but I haven't seen that she had looks any better. Governor Barnes' rewarding teachers students score high ing teachers whose its pitfalls. Using this dictate it hire teachers at whose students come poor economic According to some 20% of have low scores in areas If I were a wouldn't touch a job i! economic situations" speak only with a ten foot pole. would have two distinct! es of schools in the Those with high teachers teaching in average to upper schools. These schools # have little there would be little Onthe ers in tions could be cutoff list each good teachers these situations like Mrs. theproposedl seen anything situation without the baby out with water. We must search.