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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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March 6, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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March 6, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGF, 4 - HOGANSV1JA HOME NEWS - MARCH 6, 2003 [i00ii THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 62oo40 .k (6rimes htbliatitm Millard B• Grimes, President MIKE HALE PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOC IKl: PUBLISttER/EI)ITOR ROB RICHARDSON Aq 1 STANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINE& ¢IANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188 • Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 nogansville, Georgia 30230 I Wonder How I'll Be Remembered? Memories are those won- derful things that not only helps us to remember the good and bad things that have hap- pened in our lives, but makes us aware of how important life really is. The home that I live in today was the homeplace of my grandparents. It's filled with memories and I cherish each and every one of them. Although the home has been remodeled and doesn't look anywhere near the same as it did when my grandpar- ents lived there, it's still filled with childhood memories and I guess, in some ways, ghosts of days past. Recently, I had to have a very old oak tree cut down at my home• It had grown too close to the house, was a little diseased, and I was afraid it might fall on the home if we ever received some really strong winds. Each and every time I look outside at the stump that is left standing, thoughts of my grandfather rush through my head. Even though I was very young when my grandfather passed away, I still remember him vividly, t'airememlx, r- going through arouKh time after his death. He and I were very close and losing him was not something I could accept easily. I had always been a little on the heavy side, until my grandfather passed away that is. Everything seemed to be a challenge, even eating. In only a few months after his death, I went from being a chunky young fellow to a pretty, slim one. That old tree was his favorite spot. He called it his office. My grandfather had lung cancer and he would spend hours with me under- neath that old tree. He had a chair there and he would lift me up on his knee, tell me amazing stories about his life- time, and generally just bond with me. One thing I learned from sitting under that tree and talking with my grandfa- ther was that he loved his fam- ily, his friends and his com- munity. That old tree was the only thing I bad left that my grand- father and I shared. I really hated to see it go, but I still have all those memories we made together. I ALSO LOST bothmypar- ents are pretty young age. I have a few little mementos that belonged to my parents, and those items can bring back so many wonderful, and some- times not so.wonderful mem- ories. As a pack rat, there are many little things around the home that I've kept as my chil- dren grew that refiaind me of so many wonderful hours spent with them. For instance, there are several baseballs that were homeruns hit by son. One was from his Little League days, another from Senior League and one from high school. There is a little doll in that same drawer that belonged to my daughter when she was just an infant. I can still see her toddling through the house with a bot- tle in one hand and that doll in the other. MY CHILDREN ARE all grown now and have families of their own. Jobs, obligations and life does not allow us to spend as much time together as we once did. We're not mak- , ing as many memories as we once did and that saddens me. It's not anyone's fault, it's just that in today's society we must work more and the leisure time we do have is spent just trying to do the week-to-week duties like paying bills, wash- ing clothes, cleaning the house, mowing the'lawn, all those dreaded things we real- ly don't like to do. I do however, try to con- tact them when I can to remind them how much I love them and miss them• I THOUGHT OF ALL these things recently as I stood on my front porch looking out at that stump where a mighty oak tree once stood. I realized the old tree was a glowing example of life that we all should ke a lesson from. Ea of us areldnd of like that old oak tree tat became a victim of time and circum- stances. As we grow older time begins to take its toll and eventually, just like that tree, all that is left of our days here on earth are the memories that we shared with our loved ones, our friends and our neighbors. As I pondered what type of memories I would leave behind. I realized there would be good ones and bad ones, some to be cherished and some better forgotten. However, if there is any one thing that I would like to be remembered for, it would be as I remember my grandfa- ther, a man that loved and cherished his family, his friends and his community. "rite HtK;ANSVILI,E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 R(xseveh Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by ruaih $18 in Tmup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Peritxtical Ixstage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FOR SUISCRIPTtONS call (7(k5) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mclxul 3" Publications, P. O. Box 426• Manchester, Geotgia 3 [ 816. P(TMAsTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230. S'rAFr Publisher and Advertising Director. ............................................. i ............... Mike Hale Asstx:iate Publisher and Editor.....: ...................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rc Richardson StaffWriters ....................................................... : .................. BL'yan Geter• Billy Bryam Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis ComPosing .................................................................. Valinda lvery• Dewayne Flowers Lcgals ............................. . ........................................................................ Jayne Goldston Cilvuhtion Manager. .................................................................................... Judy Crew,',: Ih'txluction Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager ........................................................................... Wayne Gn:howski Pressnxnn ........................................... Dwnell McCauley. Jcxy Knight. Lan'y Colleges COICPOIO, TE OFn('l,Zlt'; President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice Ih'esident ................................................. : ................................ Chitrlotte S. Grimes Exccutive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Llura Grimes Cotir Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counl and Assis "umt Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Zell and Fuzz, Way Back in ' Written in 1978 NASHVILLE -- The dis- tinguished lieutenant gover- nor of Georgia, Zell Miller, is a big man in Nashville• He knows practically all the country music stars, and they know him• Zell Miller was instru- mental, a lovely choice of words, in helping Don Williams acquire a new drum- mer for his band from England recently• For the uninformed, Don Williams was named male vocalist of the year Monday night at the spiffy Country Music Association awards program here. Zell is also big buddies with Bill Anderson• Ronnie Milsap who has reached superstar status, was a stu- dent of his at Young Harris College. Zell Miller is a coun- try music expert, a country music superfan, and if he is ever elected governor, I would not be surprised if he didn't start working on mov- ing the Grand Ole Opry to Marietta. Make that "May- retta•" A wonderful thing hap- pened to Miller in Nashville He met country comedi- an Jerry Clower, who is from Yazoo City, Mississippi, and who tells funny stories in per- son and on records for a liv- ing. He used to be a fertiliz- er salesman. "I've been wanting to meet you, Lieutenant Governor Miller," Jerry Clower said, "'cause I have done used one of your stories on my latest album, and I give you credit for it. I say, 'This story comes from the lieutenant governor of the great state of Georgia.'" News that George Busbee had just abdicated the gover- norship couldn't have made Zell Miller happier. LATER, I askedhim to tell me the story. There was a rea- son for that. He's our lieu- tenant governor, the story happens in Georgia, and we deserve to hear it before the rest of the world. Ladies and Gentlemen, Jerry Clower's budding ghostwriter Zell Miller: "This is a true story. It hap- pened up in my hometown of Young Harris. Young Harris is a very small town. We did- n't even have a fire depart- ment. Not even a volunteer "One day, a house caught fire. The whole town gath- ered around to watch it. We were helpless to put it out. About that time, we saw a pickup truck come over the ridge• It was local character named Fuzz Chastain. He had his wife with him, all their kids, a cousin or two, and some aunts and uncles. 'Fuzz drove right down to where we werq all standing, but he didn't stop. He drove that pickup right into the middle of the fire. He jumped out and so did everybody else. They started beating the fire with anything they could find -- even their clothes. "It took 'em 30 mintas, but danged if they didn't put out the fire. The mayor of Young Harris was there. He said,' This is the most coura- geous thing I have ever seen in Young Harris. Let's pass "They rai§ed $17 mayor presented the to Fuzz. 'Fuzz he said ple of Young ate this heroic act of Fuzz's hair was clothes were torn•" livec 'But Fuzz, thereLmL thing" ' " to o I d like kn ,,tet u'l • , ] mayor went on, What th going to do with this ':of  "Fuzz thought aber and then said, 'Wegsv~_ Mayor, I guess the firwas, I ought to do is get the urvi fixed on that pickup."kelm, ,S )le, ( If Zell Miller den( "career" takes off, donifer if he can mix show b, M with politics. Lest wehe ( in many respects, theytne of same. .[Its• BY SPECIAL ARRAN WITH HISWIDOW, DEDRA, NEWS IS CARRYING S COLUMNS BY THE LAT GmZZARD, WHO GREW ta' BY MORELAND, AND BECA MOST WIDELY READ 6 WRITER OF HIS TIME. GI BooKS AND TAPES ARE sTI ABLEFORSALETHROUGH PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES IVJ a l ftrs. ansv erof rvic el o iral] fie Mr. 1 in R at the CMA awards show. fire department• the hat for Fuzz Chastain.' WIDE. " ., Ak ' allb The Golden Rule Is Still GoldeF , Se .,orn Go back to the days of in them as previous genera- the Golden Rule is stir,, Mrs tions, if we would see the vio- your childhood and try to remember those early Sunday School days. Go back to those days of summer Vacation Bible School. Remember the Bible stories, the games, the crafts, the grape popsicles, and the skits. I can remember some of those days. I gus my gon- eration can say*'hat those were the good old days. In thinking about those days, I can remember in Bible School and in Sunday School being taught the Golden Rule. We as children were taught to do unto others as we would have them do unto us. The Golden Rule is found specifically in Matthew 7:12 which says, "Therefor all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets." Although times have changed, society has changed, people have changed, and practices have changed, the principles of the Word of God have not changed. Truly the golden Rule is still golden. I wonder if today's gener- ation had that rule instilled lence we see today in our land? We hear the horror sto- ries of school shootings, we hear of the accounts of bul- lies in our schools, and many times we wonder what has happened to our young peo- ple. But my question IS: Where are the parents? Where are the parents who raised their children in church? Where are the parents that stood behind the teacher when the teacher disciplined the stu- dent at school? Where are the parents that taught their children the Golden Rule? I admit that despite the best efforts of some parents, there are some young people who still get into major trouble. However, compare the problems of today with the problems of yesterday, and we can see the vast difference. Why? I FEEL LIKE the reason we have such cliques in school, such acts of bullying, and such incidents of revenge is because we have forsaken the biblical principle that men have referred to as the Golden Rule. May we be also reminded that a lot of our young people have not only forsaken the Golden Rule, but we as adults have done the same. We have been so engrossed in a self-preserving society that we have forgotten about the other guy. On our roads common courtesy is almost a thing of the past. There are those who still will let a driv- er in the line of traffic, there are those who will stop at a light and leave the entrance to a business or side street open, and there are those who will still use their turn signal, but we also read and hear of road rage and general dis- courtesies. In stores acts of kindness are fading, in gro- cery stores, and even in some churches there are those who only care for self. Although the New Testament may be approaching 2000 years old, an. If a person fully consider what says in his gospel, he find there are the Golden Rule. positive side and negative side• The Mde says that we do things unIo others € • .J t|/ - . do not want done tO tl There s a poitiv the rule. We are to go( what we would like d us. We are not onlynotd others, but we are to| show acts of kindne 10 Bible says in Proverl "A man that hath frien shew himself friendly-'-- point is that we will r e we sow. Some have sai way: "What goes  - comes around. Solomon said in Eccle "Cast thy bread u waters: for thou shaltI' after many days." TODAY, why not concerted effort not to be unkind, but to t extra special effort I someone an act of ki even if they are unkin just because the Gold is still golden. :! tl g i Cornn i! In the Hogansville Her00 Predecessor to the Hogansville Ho • DEMAND FOR THAT DEVICE: "Hogansville welcomes a ness to town, that of White and Fant, "IV and Service, located on south highway in Milk Bar or bus station building. They die Philco and RCA..." • SUCH A DEAL: 'qhe John L. 152 American Legion will serve a the public Saturday, March 7 from 4:00 for $1.50 per plate for all you TAKE THAT, YANKS: 'What think.is smart, on the stage, is not smart." *LOCAL WHIZZ KIDS: "Not an Illinoi known as the "Whizz Kids" and ten basketball play for three successive Hogansville has set a similar pattem with ketball team on a distnct pattern." =TIME FOR ENTERTAINMENT: Hogansville Harmoneers of the Antioch Church will appear in concert at the High School Auditorium." ,COMMERCE, NOT DEVINE TION: Belk-Gallant Stores announced a Basemenf' was coming to Hogansville. 50 Years Ago...,