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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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March 13, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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March 13, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas L he. 1' &AI,,AJI. tjPLt00l.00,gJ.lJW LI--J[ T T JL JL00IL el HALE Written in 1978 come from another planet, floor We immediato e NEW YORK -- The hottest spot in town is Studio 54, a disco on West 54th Street, appropriately enough. Not just anybody can get into Studio 54. Here his how it works: every evening at midnight, a throng gathers outside and waits to be chosen for entrance. The lucky ones are then allowed to pay $20 per couple for admission. Once inside, there is a huge dance floor, flashing lights and music to give birth to a buf- falo by. The daneing and the music and the lights go non- stop until dawn, when many of the customers must scur- ry back to the sewers. These are the beautiful people? A regular had mentioned to me earlier, "Go stand by the men's room. You might see Andy Warhol." PLrBLISHER]ADVER'IaSING DIRECTOR JOHN KAI ASSOCIATE PUBLISHERDITOR ROn RtN ASSISTANT EDITOR. JAYNE GOLD6TON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Besides the men's and ladies' voked stares. My c was a girl person in ak ankle-length dress, al ate for dinner at "21."[r., "Funky outfit," lt A *rime, lulflkat, Milled B. P..nms, Imldmt Take a Lesson from Harris Commission girl in the bedsheet. Being an elected official is in no way an easy job. There are so many decisions to be made that will affect the peo- ple you serve and the com- munity you live in for years to come. Sometimes, it is not only a difficult task, but one that is not very rewarding. When an elected official makes a decision, he or she must sometimes base it on what is best for the commu- nity. Other times, the official must make a decision based on what the community would like for them to do. Either way, you stand to be criticized or even suffer other severe con- sequences. Such is the case with the decision made by the Harris County commission last "lhesday night. THE COMMISSIONERS were charged with making a decision of rezoning a parcel of land that would allow The World Children's Center to build in Harris County. It was not an easy one by any means. The board was charged with deciding ff this was a good thing for Harris County and if the pe0ple:6f the:'coun really wanted to be located here. The purpose of this col- umn is not to either challenge the decision or agree with it, the purpose of this column is to try and make everyone understand how the process works and to give the com- missioners a pat on the back of sorts. In the attempt to deter- mine if the center would be a positive or negative thing for the county, there was a great deal of research and leg work that had to be done. There were so many issues to be addressed and resolved, the process was not only chal- lenging, but time consuming. Once that decision was made, then the commission- ers had to contend with the residents of Harris County. They had to decide ff the res- idents wanted the center in Harris County. One can see how making a decision could be a difficult one. THE COMMISSIONERS were well aware of what the consequences would be. If they did not allow the rezon- ing, litigation was almost cer- tain. If the rezoning was granted, it would most likely not sit well with a large num- ber of constituents. Talking about being caught between a rock and a hard place! Of course, once the rezon- .ing request was denied by a 3-2 vote, The World Children's Center said the courts will have to be used to resolve the matter. Now the commissioners are facing another difficult time. Most certainly, they will hear about taxpayer's money being spent on litigation that could have been avoided. So, while the matter is resolved to some degree, the saga con- tinues, especially for the com- missioners. I will be the first to say that I'm not sure what I would have done ff I had been placed in the same position as those elected officials. I do, howev- er, give the commissioners credit for voting against the issue when they knew so much was as risk. Whether it was the right decision or not remains to be seen, but it was a decision made with a great deal of thought and humility. AS I SAID EARLIER, being an elected official is a thankless job. In this case however, I think the Harris County Commissioners should be commended for taking the time to research this matter, voting their con- victions and above all, doing all of it knowing they were in a no -win situation. It does not matter if they voted for or against this issue in my opinion, it only matters that they tried to cast a vote fully believing that vote was in the best interest of the county and its citizens. Had this vote gone the other way, I would still feel exactly the same. Other elected officials in and. around Harris County can take a few lessons from this one issue. That lesson being, our community comes first and we are going to do what we believe to be the best for this community. The second, that elected officials are put into office by the people and should listen to what those people have to say. As far as I know, we still live in a society where the majority rules. If the majori- ty of people did not want the center located in Harris County, then the commission- ers have answered their plea. Now, the people must return the favor and back the deci- sion should litigation come. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publiing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Submriplion rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid -at Hogansville, Georgia ?230 Fo s'vasOFllO call (706) 846-3188 or wnte to Ciwulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSMAs'rER: Send address c .hanges to E O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STAW Publisher and Advertising Director. ..................... ......................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykeadall Business Manager ............................................................................... Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ............................................... 2 ...................................... Roh Richardson StaffWriu:rs .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assismm Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Composing .................................................................. Valinda Ivery. Dewayne Flowers Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Gold.on Circulation Manager .................................................................................... Judy Crews Production Manager ............................................................................ Bobby Brazil Jr. Assistant Manager ........................................................................... Wayne Groctmwski Pressroom ........................................... Damell McCauley. Joey Knight. Larry Colleges CoRmp.m OncE President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vk' President .................................................................................. Ch'o,e S Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretory ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Trctsurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Gantt Leg',d Connml and Assistant Secretary .............................................. .James S. Gdmes I'M NOT CERTAIN by what criteria entrants are selected. Judging from some of the clientele I saw, it would appear to be in your favor to rooms there is one marked "it." I was given some advice on getting inside: "Make sure you dress in something unusual, or grease the door- man with a 502 I needed the 50 for break- fast the next morning. I wore my college rush outfit -- a navy blazer, gray slacks, yel- low Polo tie and Weejuns. I was inside in a New York second. "Funky outfit," said the doorman. To him, a wetsuit tux and snowshoes are nor- mal. "Disco" is our nation's lat- est nervous breakdown. Studio 54 is the home office. Truman Capote might drop by with Norman Mailer. For that matter, Godzilla might shake his booty with Yasser Arafat while Leon Spinks plays the flute. There is a strange place. There was a movie made about disco, Saturday Night Fever. In the movie, they danced the hustle, the moves were graceful and with style. In Studio 54, they dance something that resembles a monkey halfway there on an LSD trip. Say it ain't so, John Revolta. I paid my admission and went directly to the men's room to interview Andy Warhol. He wasn't there. Fan Man was. Fan Man wore a rib- bon in his hair, lipstick, a long skirt and peered out from behind a fan. "Funky outfit," he said as I walked past him. THERE WAS a girl in fatigues carrying a hula- hoop. There was another girl in a wraparound evening dress she had fashionetHYom a bedshheet. Fan Man was looking better all the time. My companion and I eventually braved the dance In the wee hourev. time to leave. There 'ch the mob scene outsi{to walked through the.sd breathless girl gralhe arm. - Itch, "How did you gett asked, in full swoon. With an air of se ance, I replied,"My f.  fit, and dtsappea Fii' the street into a fog{iiiii ty. BY SPECIAL W1THt NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE GRIZZARD, WHO BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ BOOK PRODUCTIONS, P.O. ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 WIDE. Honoring the Late Eugene Every area has its unusu- al personalities and unforget- table characters and our tri- county area is certainly no exception. No character I have known since moving into this area in 1959 has fit the mode of an unusual and somewhat different person than the late Eugene Brown. Actually my relationship was good with both Mr. and Mrs.3rown, and they were our landlords when the first moved to Manchester. In Spring, 1944 1 had met daughter Sara Brown when we were students at UGA in Athens, but this had been 15 years earlier. Harry Barnes had introduced me to son Gene Brown who was a local pharmacist. THE FIRST FEW YEARS here I bought several small tracts of timber from Eugene Brown. He would keep me on the string at times before he there was a large tract of tim- ber in the Harris City area we could not agree on a price. After a couple of years, I had about decided there would be no agreement. Meanwhile, I had come to know Mrs. Brown when I would go by her downtown dress shop to pay rent each month. She was always friendly and we soon discov- ered we had a mutual friend. It seems that Mrs. Brown had dated Dr. Marion Hubert, whom Mary had worked with in the operating room at the hospital in Athens. Dr. Hubert had been our family doctor and was at that time, team doctor for the Georgia foot- ball team. Shortly after learning this, we were in Athens and ran into Dr. Hubert. His face lit up and he was pleased to hear from his former sweet- heart. "Alma Barnes was one of the prettiest girls on cam- "His face lit up and he was pleased to hear from his for- mer sweetheart." buying the Harris City tim- ber from Mr. Brown when sometime later son Gene Brown called me one night. It seems he had been fly- ing early in the day and flew over the timber. He noticed and I went up to a day or two later much of the fine had been either dead. condition of the must adjust my timber down from two or three would not listen to Brown  J 9e at the timber. ! V ! He tapped on the beaver dama and said, "These sound even though foliage tells you either dead or I knew Mr. also in the cattle I asked him, "Would i a herd of cattle that killed by lightning ift had not Mr. Brown and smiled as he said,' not." We reached aO would accept my offer. Actually he was very friend- ly to me, and always seemed pus," Dr. Hubert said. "She was so friendly and always the belle of the ball" I could that beavers had dammed an area of timber and thought something should be done. He ment and cut the tir I always enjoyed( relationship with the glad to see me. believe that! was right! but he would rank as Back in the early sixties, I had about given up on A forester acquaintance a most unusual pers. ' I 50 Years i ..  . IIi !l!i It lry In the Hogansville END OF A DREAM: Green Wave basketball team of Reese Slaughter, fourth district for the second consecutive year and sentative of 14 counties in the ment in Macon was eliminated last Morven High School by a convincing score...." FRUGALITY WORKS: Council that billed itself as ed" in the city election one year proved it meant what it said. published dition of the City of Hogansville found ( inside pages of the Hogansville city administration took over with in the bank in December of '51 and with $19,091.01 in December '52...." SPECIAL BAPTIST SERVICE: Sunday is "Gaddy Appreciation Day" First Baptist Church." CRIME: "Jesse Coleman, a old Hogansville man; has been LaGrange, charged with car glary of a Hogansville drug store, cials said.." ORGANIZING: 'Them will be a ing of merchants and members Hogansville Chamber of Commerce  those who believe a Chamber is thing...."