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Manchester, Georgia
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March 20, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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March 20, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - MARCH 20, 2003 t 'i i 00iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!i THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A (rinl. lublh:atititt Millard B. Grimes, President 1VIII I-Ia Pu BLISHER/ADvEwr ISING DIRF'TOR JOHN KUVKENnnIJ ASSOCIA'I; PUBLISHER/EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINFSS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Flogansville, Georgia 30230 Death Is Sometimes A Welcomed End R. Doyle Moore, who has written for one of our newspa- pers for many years passed away last week, a victim of can- cer. Oneof my dear friends has a very sick mother and we all know it's just a matter of time for her. For survivors of can- cer victims and those with other long lasting terminally ill diseases, when the end does come it's usually a bitter, sweet closing. I can testify to that after losing my mother to cancer many years ago. Having to take care of a loved one that has a terminally ill disease is one of the hardest things a family member can go through. You watch the person you love sim- ply deteriorate before your eyes. To say it is painful for the both of you would be an under- statement. Every day you won- der if today is the day the end will come. Unless you've ever had to deal with something like this, you can never imagine the strain it places upon you, nor the things you have to go through. As the pain and sick- ness begins to take its toll, the medications begin to not only take an effect on their body, but their nfind as well. You struggle each and every day with the fear of losing them and the thoughts of how you just want the pain to end of them. MY MOTHER had cancer of the esophagus. She eventu- ally got to the point she could not eat. She could drink, but even that was a struggle. It was difficult to watch as she began to actually starve to death. In aperiodoftwo years, I watched as my mother dropped pound after pound. If that wasn't bad enough, the medications she was tak- ing made her sick and the pain medicine would either make her sleep and have bad dreams or make her talk about things that would make you wonder if she was losing her mind. All of that was tough, but the thing that hurt me the most was watching what was once an woman of independence become so depend upon oth- ers. I'm sure it was as humili- ating to her as it was difficult for my sister and I. As the end was drawing near, and I knew it was close, I wasn sure if I was happy or sad. Not because I wanted her to die by any means, but I just wanted her pain and suffering to end. LOOKING BACK now I realize that those were some of the best years of my life and some of the worse. Even though I was going through a extreme- ly rough time and having to deal with watching my moth- er die before my very eyes, there were many lessons about life that came from it. When the end finally came, I stood by mother's bed at the hospital and we both'knew the time was close. I grabbed her hand told her I loved her, she opened her eyes and said, "I love you to, Baby." I kissed her on the forehead. She closed her eyes again to never open them again. Her breathing began to slow down. Eventually it sound- ed rfiore like a machine breath- ing than a human being. She took that last breath and her life ended. I had prepared myself for that moment and thought it would not affect me as it did. I knew she was better off and in a better place, but none of that comforted me. When that last breath was drawn, I broke down and cried. As I said before, it was bit- ter sweet end. Knowing she was no longer in pain did help the grieving some, but it did not help the pain I felt in my heart. THE RECENT EVENTS I mentioned above has helped bring all those memories back. Even now, I have mixed emo- tions about my mother's death and that was 20 some odd years ago. The hardest thing to ever do with anyone you love is to say goodbye, but sometimes we know it's for the better. In my mother's case, it was for the better and I know that deep down inside. I realize there are many, many families out there that read my columneach week that are probably going through a similar experience. So, I decid- ed to share my story and offer just a few words of advice. For a long time after my mother's death I felt a little guilty because in some ways I was glad when it was over. I realize now that I should not have felt guilty. For even my mother said it herself not long before she died. With death comes restored freedom. That person if finally free from their pain and suffering. If your family is going through this, I'm sorry for you and my prayers are with you. TItE lto(;),Ns, II,I.E HOME NEWS i;, published v, cckly by the Star-Mercury Publishing ('ompany, a divisiou of Grimes Publicalious, at 3051 Rtx)sevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscriplioa rates by nlail: $18 in Troup. ttarris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical Ix)stage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR St*ItsCRIFrIONS call t7(kS) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. P(mrMASTER: Send address chmlges to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFE F'ublisher and Advertisiug Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale A,,swiate Publisher and fklitor ............................................................ John Kuykcndall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assislaut [-Mitor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Conllxlsiug .................................................................. Valinda NED,. Dewayne Flowers Legals ...................................................................................................... 4ayne Goldston ('irculation Mauagel: .................................................................................... Judy Crews Prtxiuclion Mtmager ............................................................................ Bobby Br,il Jr. Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pl'essrcxml ....................................... :...Damell McCauley, Jocy Knight, Larry Colleges CORPORATE OFFICER: Prcsidenl ................................................. i ........................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice Prc,ident ....................................................................  ............. Charlolte S. Grimes Eeeutive Vice Pre',ideut and Secretu'y ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal (.:oun,cl and Assistant Secretary. .............................................. James S. Grimes Here's College Life 24 Years Written in 1979 How I got invited to a University of Georgia frater- nity party at my age isn't the story here. The story is what I saw when I went there. It was the Sigma Chi's annual gathering to select a chapter sweetheart. Sigma Chis the nation over take selecting a chapter sweet- heart seriously because , somebody once immortalized young ladies so chosen with a popular song entitled, appropriately enough, "Sweetheart of Sigma Chi." A banquet preceded the party. I don't know what I expected. I had seen Animal House. I .knew that it was only a short time ago the college campus was a social battle- ground. Sometimes, it was just a battleground. But what, I asked myself, are the prevailing moods and customs of the campus on this, the eve of the 1980s? I knew about the early 60s. Itwas button-down, slick- it-back, eat, drink and chase Mary in the tight skirt and monogrammed sweater. The late 60s and early 70s were angry and hip and taking things that made you crazy and wearing clothes to look the part. THE SIGMA CHIS on this night came dressed as a GQ ad. They were three-pieced and button-downed and blown-dried almost to a man. Their dates were clones from the Phi Mu house 15 years ago. The chapter president, whose hair was shorter than mine, opened with a moving invocation. Gentlemen rose from their seats when ladies excused themselves from the tables. The dinner lasted well over an hour. Nobody threw a single morsel 6f food. When the new sweetheart was introduced, the chapter stood as one and sang her their delicate, obviously inspired rendition of the sweetheart song while she cried. Donna Reed would have played her part. John Belushi would have been asked to leave, o There was some loosen- ing up when the party began, but the frolic that followed wouldn't have qualified as even a mild public distur- bance. The band played Marvin Gaye's "Stubborn Kind of Fellow, .... Sixty-Minute Man,." and the Temptation's "My Girl." I know the words to all three songs. The University of Georgia was never a leader in the radical league and the war is over now and things are quieter everywhere, but it did occur to me after the Sigma Chi party that perhaps life on the campus has returned to normal, sis-boom- bah. *Fraternities and s0ri- ties, spurned by man=stu- dents just a few years ago, are making a big comeback at Georgia. .Political down On the Georgia The student ran with a bag the "Unknown with no platform. a walk. The stron active political pus, believe it or Young Freedom, a pro-Reagan outfit. "They don't a war," said an student want to start one." spring quarter Let's go get a have a panty raid. BY SPECIAL WITHHISWIDOW NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE GRIZZARD, BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. PRODUCTIONS, P.O. ATLANTA, GA Has Spring Sprung in Your There is a popular song that is sung around Christmas time that says, "This is the most wonderful time of year." Truly Christmas time is wonderful, but spring isn't bad either. What a joy it was to drive down Main Street the other day and see all the beau- tiful sights of spring. The budding flowering trees, the blooming flowers, and bushes. Even the sight and smell of freshly cut grass. If we would jusOmke the time and use the senses that God created with us, then we could realize and appreciate the goodness of God in our lives. Christmas and winter is won- derful, fall and Thanksgiving is wonderful, summer and July Fourth is wonderful, and spring and Easter is wonder- ful. God has blessed us with four seasons to savor and enjoy. We know the seasons are from God because His word tells us in Genesis 8:22, "While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease." All around us the signs of spring are appearing, as the dead things of winter are giv- ing way to the new life of spring. The pleasure of new life is a pleasure that only God can give. Without the Lord above who controls it all and keeps this universe together there would be no springtime to enjoy. The joys of waking up to the singing of birds, the smell of honeysuckle, the blowing of a soft, breeze and the col- ors of eye pleasing flowers are simply blessings of the new life that our Heavenly Father gives in springtime. It seems as if nothing could be better. But, believe it or not, it can get better. The same new life that you enjoy secondhand, (that is seeing other things coming to new life) you can enjoy firsthand (that is you yourself coming to new life). THE BIBLE tells us in Second Corinthians chapter five and verse 17, "Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.;' John also tells us in his gospel that Christ came that we might have life and that we might have it more abundantly. Just as life seems to wake up in the springtime, we as human beings can experience a life even greater than spring affords. The life that appears in the spring will grow during the summer, .but when win- ter comes, it will "die" again. But the new life that is to be found in Christ, is a life that will never die. As a child of God you can enjoy springtime like life twelve months out of the year. Jesus said in John 10:28, "And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish..." The word per- ish means to experience ruin or destruction. The green grass may turn beautiful flowers er, and the trees their leaves has sprung in the believer, there to that new life. says, "But keth of the give him shall but thewatdr that I him shall be in water springing lasting life." ,, JUST as we ca signs of spring all do the signs of a new 1 up in your life? The ing light of the sun! refreshing rains bri life of spring, but it i the son of God that t of spring can be eV human beings Johns "For God so loved tl that he gave his onli ten son, that wht believeth inhim shd perish, but have ev0 life." The same joy thsi brings can be experi Christ whether it is summer, winter or fs Hogansville Hq FAMILIAR SIGHT: "A.J. Shaver of North Carolina and man for the past several months around Hogansville, is a familiar: pushes his home-made daily. He can be seen as much out into the country on nice days, his cart, which he believes hel case of rheumatism..." THIS JUST IN: "Loy Williams, been associated with the repair and ditioning of shoes, has branched operation and is now the maker of Glazed Doug(h)nuts. '1 am both a saler and a retailer and the catching on very fast in Hogansville .... ENTERTAINMENT: "WMS Antioch Chumh To Present Play: maids will gather at the High tonum March meeting. (The business being how man) which is the main object and believe me, they are out to the best way they can." SIGNS OF SPRING: taking the Wednesday afternoon, planting their gardens..." CHAMBER MEET: "The Hogansvilte as a business the hands of the merchants and men...." .......... ...... ....... 50 Ye?rs i00t00eatt00uitlx i&ralb ..... ................ .... ................. ..................................................... Ago ,Chamber of Commece To Meet . [! At Legion Home Tomght At 7101 I '/crt s , . r.:_s os  c,w.,.f ' ........ ": .'" 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