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March 25, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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March 25, 2004
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2004 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62oo40 A 6~ 1Jub~at~ Millm'd B. Gdn'ms, JOHN KUYK~=N DALL PUBI JSHER/EDITOR LAURm I~:~aS AD~X'~tNG DmVXvIYOR CLINT CLAYBROOK AS~K'IATE EDrI'OR RoB 17d~ /L,;.st ~rANT EDrn)R JAYNE C~)LDbWON B usv~=ss M2XNA(;V:R Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 I~ O. Box 426 Hogansville: Georgia .30Z~) When Christ Died 9 I Was on His Mind Even though I would like to see "The Passions of Christ", time constraints and other things in life have kept me from doing so. After read- ing an article on the Associated Press wire serv- ice on Friday, I'm more intrigued than ever. According to the article, a couple in Statesboro went to see the movie and got into a heated argument after- ward. The argument esc~at- ed to violence and both Were arrested. According to the article, the couple left the theater debating whether God the Father in the Holy Trinity of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit was in human form or spiritual. Of course, simply turning to the Bible would have set- tied the argument for the cou- ple. If you read it, the Bible is pretty clear on the issue. You can read it in John for yourself. Anyway, when the police arrived at the couple's home, the wife had ripped her hus- band's shirt off and he had punched a hole in a wall near a stairway. A police report said that Melissa Davidson suffered injuries on her left arm and face; while Scan Davidson had a scissor stab. Both were charged with simply battery in the case and were released from jail on a $I,000 bond each. It is ironic, a preacher and I were discussing the movie a few Weeks ago, we both agreed that ffthe movie could somehow reach those that were lost, it would be worth it. However, one of the things we also discussed was the possibility that the movie could do more damage than good. I guess we'll have to walt for a while to determine what the end result is. ONE THING is for sure, if anything bad, such as the one I spoke about above, do happen you can rast assured it will be highly publiCtzed. One thing that I f~und to be kind of funny, w~s that Melissa Davidson was quot- ed in the paper as saying~"It was the dumbest thing I've ever done." The police officer that investigated the incident was quoted as saying, "Really, it was kind of a pitiful thing, to go to a movie like that and fight about it. I think they missed the point." So what's new? " Christians have been telling this story for 2000 years and people keep miss- hag the point. The truth of the matter is this. There are two types of believers. There is the true believer, the person that is really saved, and the reli- gious believer, they believe in going to church and doing all the tings that a Christian does, but they have not been saved. I think Mel Gibson had good intentions with the movie, not to mention the fact that he might be probably will make a lot of money off of it. However, I'm not sure that it will change anything because it is the same message that has been given over and over in every church in the world in the last 2000 years. MUCH CAN BE said about the movie, but we must realize that is exactly what it is, a movie. It can come close to telling the story, but no ~, matter0b~v close it comes to reality, it is not the real storT nor the entire story. To know the story aboutChrist, how he lived, the circumstances around his death, we must read our Bible. When Gen. Hal Moore vis- ited the Harris County Chamber annual banquet recently. He stated that even though the movie "When We Were Soldiers" came close to telling the story, it did not in any way show the "entire story." I don't think a movie ever made can do that. When a movie is made, it being done with actors and a producer. You can't get a true feeling of what the actual per- son felt or was thinking. Although I have not seen "Passion," I'm sure it is the same. For me, the story behind the death of Christ that real- ly matters is a very simple one. Christ suffered a cruel death, there is no doubt about that, but he did it for mankind. He also did it for me. The thing that really mat- ters to me, is that 2000 years ago when he was hanging on that cross and was being beat- en and cursed, he looked into the future and saw a old coun- try boy like me and died for my sins. The bottom]ine is simply this, when he was hanging on that cross... I was on his mind. To me, that is the thing that must be remembered. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NE~'S is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Coml~ny. a division of Grimes Publications. at 3~)51 Rot~velt High~ ay. Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620.040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup. Harris or Meri~ether Counties: $24 a yearelsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230Single copy 50. FOR St, eSCRWTIONS CMI ~7~ 846-3188 or write to Circulatkm Manager. Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426. Mar~l~ster. Ge~n'gia 31816. Ih~'TXt~,s~: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. H(~ansvillc. GA 302-30. STX~V Publisher and FMitor ............................................................................ John Kukyendall Advertising Director .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis As.~.~iate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldst(~n Assistant Editor ....................................................... : ............................. Rob Richardson Stall Writers ......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy B~'ant Comlxxsition .............................. Dewayne Flowers. Robert Wecms. Gad Ytmngblood Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager. .......................................................................... Trac) L) nn W) att Press Manager. ............................................................................... Wh) ne Grt~:howski Pressroom, Assistants ..................... Larry College~. Zaddie Dixon.Damcll McCaule) Mailroom Distributvm ............................................................................... David Boggs CoseonAr Omc~JtS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. ~mes Vice President .................................................................................. Ch~oue S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secrelary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cot~ Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett legal Coun~l and A~istant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Mother JUst Didn't Know From Lewis Grizzard's collection "If Love Were Oil, I'd Be About a Quart Low" Written in 1979 As I look back on it, I sup- pose my mother really didn't know any better. After we moved back to live with my grandparents in Moreland the second time, I started second grade in the little ' elementary school there. The students were a bit different from those I had encountered my first-grade year in the relative metrop- olis of Columbus. Moreland's was a country school, draw- hag the sons and daughters of pulpwooders, sheet rockers, sawmill hands and share- croppers. I had traveled some by then, although I was only six, but I had never seen anything quite like the group that assembled the first day of classes in Mooreland. There were the Garfield brothers, for instance, a rather disagreeable three- some who seemed to take a certain joy in raising large knots on the heads of their classmates. They brought a homemade explosive device made from gunpowder to school the first day and blew out all the windows in the, third-grade room. My instincts told me right away that the Garfields were not to be messed with. I tried to explain that fact of life to my mother the next morning, when she insisted that I wear short pants to school, but she wouldn't listen. So off to school I went with my knees exposed, knowing that if the Garfields spotted me in that outfit, I likely would not live out the day. I was nearly cor- rect in my assumption. I MANAGED to avoid them all morning, but then came the dreaded recess. The Garfield brothers - Frankie, whose nickname was deservedly "Dynamite," Harold, and Dickie - spotted me and my shorts, as I attempted to hide behind the monkey bars on the play- ground. "What's your name, fancy pants?" asked Frankie, the oldest, who was in the sev- enth grade. I was barely able to speak from the fear and trembling. I managed to get out a feeble, "Lewis." I thought of perhaps offering them my first year's salary when I got out of col- lege to spare me, but things were moving to quickly. "Your mama put them short pants on you?" asked Harold, a fifth grader who was already the size of a Plymouth. I promised to bring a writ- ten note from my mother the next day, in which she would explain to the Garfields how I had resisted the short pants, with an addendum promising I would never show up at school in such an outfit again, if it so offended them. "You want me to whoop him, Frankie?" the youngest Garfield, Dickie, a third- grader, asked his older broth- er. "Or do you want to do it?" I stood frozen in fear, awaiting Frankie's answer. I did feel some better about the situation at this point, how- ever, and made a mental note to thank the Garfields later for deciding to designate only one of their lot to raise knots on my head, rather than all three taking turns. SUDDENLY, something happened that assured me there was, indeed, a God who watched over each of his sparrows, especially if they happened to be wearing short pants. Before the Garfields could decide which one of them was going to welcome me to Moreland School, Arnold Bates, who was a teacher's pet because he was always answering questions first and never doing any- thing to antagonize his instructors- such as making obscene figures out of the modeling clay or tearing out pages from his reading book to make spitball~ - walked 11 o, +g. Ho+ candy bar.il The Garfields w~] children, who ne~] money for candy of~] Later I would learn ~/ had a voracious sw~i however, and they ~4 their desire for ~4! ing it away from the smaller children on ground. They left me knees knocking in pants and chased l Arnold Bates, t~ Hollywood bar awa~ his, and gave hima f~ on the head while th~ at it. When I returned.I from classes, I exp~ my mother how I had][ escaped being maim~ Garfields because q short pants, was a wonderful, standing person have any children to she promised be forced to return to similarly attired. BY WITH HIS WIDOW, El} COLUMNS BY THE G~, WHO GREW l BY M~, AND BEC~ MOST WIDELY ltEAD GI wRrI'ER OP HIS TIME. GI~ BOOK5 AI~D TAPES ARE s'rR/ AmmF~SAmmm~JG.~ PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX A~I,~NTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES ~ WIDE. Appreciating the Faithfulness of There are times when we all go through the difficult times of life. Those times may be times of sickness, death, famit~ +l~a~ble~ ~.financial reverses, or the everyday temptations of life. Someone has made the statement, '~ou are either in a storm, coming out of a storm, or headed to a storm." It is during these difficult days of life that one of the many tactics of Satan come to bear on our lives, and that is his weapon of accusation. The devil by name means an accuser. From a careful study of the Bible, one can find that Satan has four tar- gets for his accusations. He will accuse man to God, man to man, man to him- self, and he Will also accuse God to man. It is during the trials of life that one will find Satan accusing Godto man. While in those difficult days, the enemy of souls will try to cast on dark shadows on the grace and mercy of God Almighty. He will bring things to our minds like, "If God really loved you, then why did he let your father die?" or he might say, "If God is so great, then whY..didn~ he stop your child from having that wreck?" One of the goals of Satan is to hinder and even try to stop people from placing their faith in the living God of glory. (2 Corinthians 4:4) But, John eight tells us that Satan is a liar and the father of lies. Dear child of God, when the dark days of life come, rest assured that God is faith- ful. There has not been one promise of God that has "fell to the ground." HOWEVER, because we are still living in this robe of flesh, weoften struggle in our faith in God's control of things. Many times we are like Job who sadd in Job 23:3, "Oh that I knew where I might find him? That I might come even to his seat." He also said in that same chapter beginning in verses 8-10, "Behold, I go forward, but he is not there; and back- ward, but I cannot perceive him. On the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him; he hideth himself on the right hand, that I can- not see him: but he knoweth the way that I take: when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold." Many times in the trials we wonder where God is and if he has indeed left us. Look back to what Job said in verse nine, "On the left hand, ~vhere he doth work, but I cannot behold him." Job said that even though he could not see God working, he was still working. ALL THROUGH scrip- ture, we can see where God worked be~tmd the scenes for the benefit of his people. There maybe some times when the people of God can- not see God work in their lives, but we can have confi- dence in knowing Hebrews 13~ is ,, The Bible said, "...fl hath said, I will never'i thee nor forsake ,fl Although we mglg.n~ ceive him at times, always with us and for who love him and ar~ called according to his pose, he is working all tl for our good and his (Romans 8:28) AS WE THINK ab subject such as this, a' written by A. J. Sims e~ "The Unseen Hand" co~ mind. The first verse chorus goes like this, is an unseen hand to me leads through ways I .Wh,ego world of woe, This leads me as I go. I'm tr~ to the unseen hand, ] guides me thru this v~ land, And some sweet dgl reach that strand, Still t ed by the unseen hand." May we always re~ ber that while in the tr~ life, our Heavenly Father be true to his word and leave or forsake his child Ag rS O-,, Hogansville Herald Pmdeceuoctoll~ ~ Honm New~ * BEFORE THE ASBESTOS BAN - U.S. Rubber's io~ asbeston plant was starting to feel the effects of a downtu~ demand for the product. "Due to the heavy cut in ~tia curtailing many expected contracts for asbeslon products as as a drop ~ the sale of asbeston ironing board cx~ws" the I~ would cud produclkm and operate just one shift. Information aJ~ applying for unemployment was also included in the stY, Unem4~loyment pay could be as high as $26 per week, it not~ .CINEMA TIME- Apparently it was female~theme wee~ ! the Royal Theatre. Offedngs included-Problem Girts," Redheads from Sea, e." ~d," and "M~s Sad~ Thommon."~ *WANT AD WONDERS, "For sale: Underwood P~ Champion typewriter, used only three months. Complete carrying case. May be seen at Jenkins+Drag Sty." "CALUNG ALL PSYCHOLOGISTS - Although the was essentially local news-only, there was a somewhat.ur~ plalr~l picture of a chimpanzee and a scantily-clad woman 0 ~n inside page with the caption" 'My, my, look at that,' addle Ears the Chimp as he gazes at F!lm Lovely Kathle# Case." ,AGOOD IDEA, ATTHETIME-TheTroupCounty ~ Service was drumming up support for its'C, otton Growem Scho0 to show local farmers the advantages of the crop. m we -- V.o . no, a she up let somebody else use it, exclaimed Ben Askew after readia where a 90-year-old Kentucky woman has used the te~ only once in her life."