"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
March 28, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
March 28, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVIL HOME NEWS - MARCH 28, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 620.040 A 6rhns 1 MIKE HA. PUBLaStrJAoVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KLaeOALL AS,DCIATE PUBLISHER]EDITOR ROB ICHARnSON Assls'rArr EDrrOR JAYNE N BUSINESS MANAG Phone (706) 846.3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P, O. Box 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230 Why Be an Umpire? Love of the Game It's funny that sometimes, the more things change, the more they stay the same. That certainly holds true in youth baseball and softball. Every year at this time, I go to the "junk" room in my house, take out my plate gear, get out my uniform, polish my shoes and head out every Saturday morning to call base- ball and softball at Moultrie Park in Hamilton. Although, as an Umpire, you get.screamed at by the players, coaches and fans, there's something that just continues to drive you out there, Being an umpire is some- thing that not ever person can do, but certainly something that everyow should try. Believe it or not, I umpire because of the That's the only reaso Some people think um4ires are out there to make money, that's not true, because of the expense involved in umpLm_g. The expenses of equipment, travel, training all adds up and I can assure you an umpire usu- ally spends about as much as he makes each year. rrFUNNY how I gotinto umpiring. For 16 years I coached youth sports. I saw my share of good umpires and "Whi/e mostpeo- p/e don00 think so, an wnpire hates to ca// strike three on a understandit, unless you'vehad the privilege to umpire at some point andtime, whenaplay hap- pens, you don have time to think about which team youYe calling out or safe, you don't have time to think about who the player is, the coach is or anything else. You simply look at the play, make a determina- tion as quickly as you can and call what you see It's that sim- ple, there is no other thought some that I thought were not process involved. so good umpires. I decided that I would begin umpiring to make a difference. While I think I have, it's funny what Fve learned. One thing I've learned is that almost every umpire I've ever met, loves the game. You have to in order to spend the time it takes to learn every rule and regulation and the abuse that goes along with it. The other things I've leanmd, is that all umpires I've ever met, really care about the players. While most people don think so, an umpire hates to call strike three on a child, hates to call a child out, and above an, hates to see either team lose a game, After a game, the umpires sit around and talk about the action, the si that arese in the game, how they can deal with it better the next game, and above all what they can do to improve. Most often, the upsetting  that happen between umpiregand players, umpires and coaches and umpires and fans i# usually quickly forgotten, at.least by the umpire. WHE aIINgS DO hap- pen on tbe field, tbe mnpire is charged with taking control. People sometimes forget that this is a child's gameand should betreatedassuck Often, coach- es, players and parents think that umpiresare caU agamt a certain team, a certain coa a certain player. None of that is true. While most people don't The best way to explain it is like this. When a fly ball is hit to a center fielder, he or she has a split second to determine where the ballis, to get intoposi- tion and make the play. An urn#re is doing the same thing. It's all reaction to the play, not a thought process. DO UMPIRES MAKE mis- takes? Oh yeal WeYe human, just ever,one era. However, when considered how many calls an umpire makes in a game, I would say ie or two mistakes is a pretty good percentag You see, when an umpire calls behind the plate in a Little League game, he sees an aver- age of five pitches per hatter. He also sees an average of five hatters from each team per inning or tea in a inning. Now, that's in an average game. A high scoring game would be much more. However, that means that an umpire sees SO pitches per inning. If he  six innings, that's 3OO pitches calle Then he usually makes at least five other cans dur each inning. To make a long story short, on an average an umpire makes about 3 calls per game, Now, out of 350 calls, if he gets two wrg, that's still atx 99,5 %. That's a pretty good average. So, the next time you're involved in a youth game, think aboOt this, and maybe you won't be so quick to judge an umpire. Remember, he or she loves the game, works hardandcalls only wbat they se Tm HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mexcury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rotes by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR StSPrlONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Sta Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STA Publisher and Advertising Director ......................................... : .................... Mike Hale Associate Publiand Editor. .......................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ...............  ................................................................ Jayne Goldston Amnt or .........................................  ............................................ Rob lchani,on StaffWriters ......................................................................... Bryan C.er, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ....................................................................................... Linda Lesr Composing ................................................................. Dewaym Flowers, Valinda lvery Legals ............................................................................................ :. ........ Jayne ldston Pr,n Manager ........................................................................ Wayne Pressroom .......................................................................... David Boggs, Larry Colleges L ............................................................................................  B. Grimes We PresidenL ................................................................................. Charlotte S Grimes Secretary ...................... .................................................................... Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ........................................................................................ Kathy Grimes Legal Counsel and As,istant Secretary .............................................. Jarrs S. Wher6to Draw the Line on As far as I know, my late grandfather never read The New York Times. He read the Bible, the Market Bulletin and a Sears Roebuck catalog, but I just can't picture him dealing with the likes of R.W. Apple, Jr., William Safire and Flora Lewis. I think he would have been astounded ff he had ever picked up a Times, as I did the other day, and read a front-page story about how scientist have been fooling around with his most unfa- vorite fish, the carp. The Times story, dis- played at the bottom of the left of page one, explained how scientists have taken a growth gene out of trout and have implanted it in carp, thus making it possible to grow bigger carp. "Who in the devil," my grandfather would have said, peering over the top of the Times, "would wanta bigger carp?" My grandfather was a kind and gentle man, but there were a few things he hated. Among those were opera singers on The Ed Sullivan Show. Jehovah's Witness and carp. "Sorriest fish there's ever been, the carp," my grandfa- ther would say. "It's too hard to clean and too bony to eat." On one of our fishing trips to Sibley's Pond, something grabbed my hook and down went my cork. I ran backward with my cane pole in order to pull my fish out of the water. But when I landed my catch on the bank, my grandfather took one look at it and growled, "All you got is a carp. Throw it back." With that ' background, then, it should come as no sur- prise that when I read the Times story I, too, reacted "Who in the devil would want a bigger carp?" Italked to several fishing experts to find out. One, Charles Salter, fishing writer of The Journal/Constitution in Atlanta, told me Orientals treat carp as a delicacy. He even said that during the Vietnam War, Lyndon Johnson send fish experts to that country to help the natives produce more carp. Mr. Salter did, however, agree there has been some hostility toward the carp in this country, and he also said the carp was difficult to clean. (You bleed 'em," he said. Ugh.) I also read a piece by a veteran outdoor writer Charlie Elliot, who defended the carp, saying if prepared correctly it makes a delicious meal that carp are fun to fish for because they will bite any- thing, such as doughballs made of everything from cornmeal to powdered crack- ers, peanut butter, onions and Jell-O. Perhaps I could have changed my grandfather's mind about the carp had the Times story broken while he was still alive. "You know the Times," I could have said to him." 'All the news that fit to prinL" "That's one thing," my grandfather likel have said, "but 'all that's fit to eat' is BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE CARRYING GRIZZARD, NEARBY BECAME THE MOST ! READ GEORGIA HIS BUT HE BELONGED GEORGIA, OF WROTE SO WHERE A PORTION FROM HOGANSVHE IS HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD ESTABIJSHED EDITING BELOVED ABLE FOR SALE BOX 31118-1266 Here's My Fred Dawley Almost every day or night I find myself heading south out of Manchester into Talbot County via Highway 41 on various assignments for the newspaper. It is almost as ff my vehicle can guide itself down the road after many years of travel. Even before I became editor of the Talbot County legal organ, I combed Talbot County looking to buy veneer logs. Forties and extends to the present day. Just this past week I was in Probate Judge Slade Johnson's office where we were reminiscing about bygone days. Fifty years now seems only a few days flash- back of life. This past week on my trips south, I noticed the cleaning and clearing of an area just over the mountain once known as Dawley's Junkyard I have been told that Fred Dawley served on a German submarine during World War H, but was never able to substantiate this report. I do know that Fred Dawley spoke broken English as most nationalized citizens, and had a "short fuse," and was a good citizen as far as I knOW. Fred Dawley had a teenage son named Bill who was among the first 25 employees we hired when we began operating the veneer mill in May, 1959. It was through son Bill I got to know Fred Dawley. From time to time we would purchase used parts from him. As far as I know Fred Dawley was an honest man, who quoted you a fair price and was not known to haggle over prices. It was Dawley's price, or no sale! Back in the early sixties, I had a logger with a person- ality just the opposite of Fred Dawley. No mater what price you quoted him he wanted to question the offer. Jimmy Hendrix was a good logger and equally honest, but just could not refrain from ques- tioning any offer anyone would quote. Late one afternoon whae working in the woods, a tree limb fell on the windshield of his log truck and shattered it to pieces. The next morning Hendrix and I went over the mountain to confront the elder Dawley about a wind- shield for his truck. We found "Late one after- noon while working in the woods, a tree limb fell on the windshield of his log truck and shat- tered it to pieces." exactly what we were look- ing for and sought Fred Dawley for a price on the windshield. Dawley joined us at the site of the windshield and in his typical broken English said, "Twenty-five dollar?" Hendrix and I both knew that a new'windshield for his truck would be over one hundred dollars, but he could not resist the temptation to ask for a lower price. "You don't think twenty-five dollar?" Fred Dawle, the case, the taking up valuable : his yard. Then he down and picked size windshield to Fred Dawley leaving us standing pile of broken glSS mouths open. Ler Hendrix for a new truck. Isn it strange th_g by the side the mountain can memories at old? Fred several years ago, are many Fred ties still around in county area. As I looked cleanup crew junkyard last week about this also wondered windshield thought about did not. No stand. Has Spring Sprung In Your There is a popular song that is sung around Christmas time that says, "This is the most wonderful time of year." Truly Christmas time is won- derful, but spring isn't bad either. What a joy it was to drive down Main Street the other day and see all the beau- tiful sights of spring. The bud- ding flowering trees, the blooming flowers, and bush- es. Even the sight and smell of freshly cut grass. If we would just take the time and use the senses that God cre- ated us with, then we could realize and appreciate the goodness of God in our lives. Christmas and winter is won- derful, fall and Thanksgiving is wonderful, summer and July Fourth is wonderful, and spring and Easter is wonder- ful. God has blessed us with four seasons to savor and enjoy. We know the seasons are from God because His word tells us in Genesis 8:22, "While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease." All around us the signs of spring are appearing, as the dead things of winter are giv- ing way to the new life of spring. The pleasure of new life is a pleasure that only God can give. Without the Lord above who controls it all and keeps this universe together, there would be no springtime to enjoy. The joys of waking up to the singing of birds, the smell of honeysuckle, the blowing of a soft breeze and the colors of eye pleasing flowers are simply blessings of the new life that our Heavenly Father gives in springtime. It seems as if nothing could be better. But we/comeyour/ett00. Please mail The Hogansville Home News P. O. Box 426. H Gcocgia 30230 Please fax them 7O6.846-22O6 believe it or not, it can get better. The same new life that you enjoy secondhand (that is seeing other things coming to new life), you can enjoy firsthand (that is you your- serf coming to new life). The Bible tells us in Second Corinthians chapter five and verse 17, "Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new." John also tells us in his gospel that Christ came that we might have life and that we might have it more abundantly. Just as life seems to wake up in the springtime, we as human beings can experience a life even greater than spring affords. The life that appears in the spring will grow dur- ing the summer, but when winter comes, it will "die" again, But the new life that is to be found in Christ, is a life that will never die. As a child of God you can time like life out of the year. John 10:28, "And them eternal life; shall never word perish means rience ruin or The green grass brown, maywither, 10se their leaves of a believer, there' end to that new life. says, "But keth of the give him shall but the water that him shall be in hint water springing lasting life." Just as we up in your ing light of the refreshing Life of spring, but it the Son of of spring can be "For God so loved ! that he gave ten son, that beeveth in him perish, but have life." The same Christ whether summer, winter or t