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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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March 30, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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March 30, 2000
 

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'2 ' .... , . ...** .o ..... ". ,'j, | THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A Grime lhblicaon MIIlard B. Grimes, Pmeldent USPS 62O-04O ." lVlmE tIAm .1," IasAD,RTISlNG DmECrOR JOHN KUVKENDALL .SSOC1ATE PUBLISHERIEDITOR BRYAN GETER ASSOCIATE EDITOR ........ , AYNE GOLDSTON BUSlNFSS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O, Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 There's No Fool Like an AW"I Fool Saturday will be April Fools Day. What is April Fools Day and how did it begin? It is common belief during the reformatiom of the calendar the date was moved from April I to January I. There was no television nor radio at this time, so the word spread slowly. Some ignored the change while others just merely forgot. These people were consid- ered "fools" and jokes were played on them. In sixteenth century France, the new year was observed on April 1. Much like today, parties and dancing lasted into the late hours of the night ........ In 1562, Pope Gregory.intro, duced a new calendar for the Christian world and the new year fell on January 1. In that day, some refuse to believe and others still hadn't heard the new year had changed, so pranks were played on them. In France today, April 1 is call "Poisson d'Avril." French children fool their friends by tap- ing a paper fish to their friends' backs. When the "young fool" discovers this trick, the p r!mkster yells, "Poisso@,d" Avail" (April Fish!) -- The fish in April are newly hatched and easy to catch. In America, we play small tricks on our friends. For instance, we point down and say to a buddy, "Your shoe strings are untied." In the 1800's teachers would say on Aprils Fools Day, "Look[ A flock of geese" and point up. School children would tell other students that school has been canceled and when the vic- tim fails for the joke, the ,o Mark Twain said, "The first of April is the day we remember what we are the other 364 days of the year." " t I prankster yells, "April Fool." Another prank which are commonly played on April I is putting salt in the sugar dish. College students sometimes set the alarm clocks tm hour behind so the roomate will show up to the wrong class or not even show up at all. In Scotland, April Fools day last 48 hours. Day two is known as Tally Day  ld pranks involving the "lSoste or arepied. The victim of the practical joke is referred to as "hunting the gowk"-- the gowk is an extinct cuckoo bird. Most April jokes are in good fun and is not meant to harm any- one. The most clever April Fool joke is the one where everyone laughs, especially the person upon whom the joke is played. Mark Twain said, "The first of April is the day we remember what we are the other 364 days of the year." Have a good April Fool's Day, he safe and have fun. THE.HOGANSVlL HOME NEWS is published weeldy by the Star-Mercury Publishing - Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, : Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Ge(ia 30230. Foa suascmertoNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................. : ................................. Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Associate Editor...; ................................................. ............................................. Bryan Geter Business Manager ........................................... .'. ........................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Pholography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery,  Smith, Laurett King . Legals ........................................................................................................... ,....Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds ................................. : ...................... . ..................... Cleta Young Production Manager..:....L:. ................... . ......................................................... Roland Foiles ,Preroom .......................... "r. .................................... David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski Comz OFROmS President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes : Vice President .. ..................................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................  ............................................................................... laura Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Gantl Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... .James S. Grimes OPINION PAGE 4 HOGANSVmLE HOME NEWS - IaCH 30, 2000 :;. " .... Calvin Hipp Was Well now, here it is Monday, and in some says right gloomy. I had a friend once who said, "the only good thing about Monday is that it only comes once a week." I've also had a few friends whose Mondays didn't start until some- time Wednesday afternoon. But it's not really gloomy. Spring is trying to slip in. Some flowers are blooming, trees are budding, birds are singing, and rose bush- es are being planted. When the wife said she wanted a few rose bushes I, in my child-like igno- rance, though she meant a few. I'm glad she only wanted one hus- band not a few or we would see them hanging out the windows, doors and roof top l I promised last week to con- tinue more of Frank Barton's let- ter. Frank, we have received sev- eral nice comments on your let- ter, and a letter from Donald Harris living in Riverdale, GA. (The Hogansville Herald gets around.) Donald mentions being a scout when I was Scoutmaster and we well hear more of his let- ter later on. Frank, you did not mention the small concession in the Community Building where they sold candy, drinks and all day suckers. It was run, as I recall, by Mr. and Mrs. Melson. One thing they sold was little round candles. If you got one with a ping inside you got some free ones, so we always p uUe d for pink. The suckers they sold would last, ff you didn't lick too hard, through a movie, a serial, the comedy and The Pathe News. They just don't makethem like that anymore. In your other letter you men- tioned a man that certainly deserves recognition if ever a man did. That man was Calvin Hipp, better known as "Dusty". You and I and many others worked with him at the "Mill" (U.S. Rubber). He and his crew kept the ground spotless and beautiful. Everyone knew Dusty and he knew everyone. He was good at whatever came up, even softball. Before making his pitch he would always place his hand upon the ground - for this I sup- pose, came the name Dusty. He would talk to the batter, the spec- tators or anyone else within a half mile. I remember once he told a batter, "You better hit this one because it's the best one I'm gonna throw you." Frank says he invent- ed jogging because he walked so fast, but I think jogging was "If I should die, think only this of me "...There's some comer of this field that is for- ever Calvin!" III . invented by Adam trying to catch Eve. Calvin Hipp was generous with his expertise in growing and planting. Many homes and churches in Hogansville are more beautiful today because of his landscaping and planting. When I lived near Winnie and Calvin Hipp on Lone Oak Road, he gave much advice and work. They were good neighbors. Myrtle Hill Cemetery owes much of its beauty to Dusttand FDR'S Cool Reception in (Another in a series) JAMES ROOSEVELT tele- phoned James Farley in early spring to ask about an official party statement on the primaries. The young Roosevelt was serv- ing as a political aide in the White House. Farley, Postmaster General and chairman of the party, dictated a statement on the primaries, which concluded: "These nominations are entire- ly the affairs of the state or the congressional districts, and how- ever these early battles may result the National Committee will be behind the candidates that the people themselves choose. This goes for even state and even congressional district." Ten minutes later Farley's phone rang. It was James. "Father has struck the last two sentences out," he said. Subsequently, the President told Farley he wanted to defeat Sen. Walter George and a handful of other members of Congress - some of whom, it turned out, did not have opposi- tion. In March Roosevelt went to Warm Spriggs for a week's rest. En route his train stopped at the north Georgia town of Gainesville. It had been devas- tated by a tornado, then rebuilt with federal aid. Roosevelt deliv- ered a major speech in the newly named Roosevelt Square to a crowd of some 20,000 townsfolk and visiting mountaineers and farmers. The New York Times called the audience "the greatest turnout ever given him by a Southern community during his years at the White House." He had spoken to larger southern audiences before, but the 20,000 in Roosevelt Square represented double the town's population. ROOSEVELT HAD also spo- ken to more enthusiastic audi- ences. He received relatively lit- fie applause and few cheers. The reason given to the press by some Democrats was that north Georgians were typically reserved. The more likely answer was that Roosevelt's speech appeared to be an attack on Georgia (thus the Gainesville reaction was a portent of the Southwide reaction that would greet the "economic. problem number one" report later that summer). He said the "lower South" had such meager purchasing power, because of low wages, that it "cannot and will not" establish "successful new industries." He said his administration was trying to help the South and "...the 'lower 00oVuth had such meager pur- chasing power, because of low wages, that it "cannot and will not", establish "suc- cessful new indus- tries." poor persons elsewhere, but was being held back by "selfishness on the part of a few." He said such people still believed in the feudal system, which he compared to fascism. To such people "in and out of pub- lic office, who still believe in the feudal system... The people of the United States and every section of the United States are going to Breakfast in New C,l, New Orleans" I went down for breakfast from my room in the Fairmont Hotel. New Orleans, I might add, is still here after host- ing the Super Bowl and the annu- al showcase for mental illness known as Mardi Gras. I ordered what I always order for breakfast" grits, toast, bacon, two eggs medium-well and a Tab. (I realize most people start their days with coffee or orange juice, but I drink Tab, which certainly isn't as weird as some of the other stuff I do.) As usual, I went over how to cook eggs medium-well with my waitress."I want the white com- pletely done" I don't want any of it to ooze- and I want the yellow almost done, but not quite. Rather thgn running, I want the yellow tO crawl." I sipped on my Tab and glanced through the morning paper, awaiting my breakfast. The big story in New Orleans was whether or not the state will egalize casino gambling. I'm all or it. Sin was invented in New Orleans. What's one more? The waitress brought my eggs. ! knew by looking at them they were prepared incorrectly. The yellow had been left on the heat far too long and it wasn run- Ring or crawling. It was just sort of sitting there, hard as Chinese arithmetic. "rhese eggs aren't what I ordered at all," I said. "The yel- low is overcooked.'rhe waitress was very pleasant. "I will take them back," she said. In a very few moments she returned with my eggs and this time they were prepared per- fectly. "I'm so sorry," she said, '"out I punched in your order incorrect- ly on the computer." For a moment, I thought she said she had punched in my order incorrechh/on a computer." That's exactly what she said. "You have a computer that you tell how a customer wants his eggs cooked?" I asked, shocked at the very notion of such a thing. "We recently modernized our kitchen," the waitress replied. How long, America, oh, how long are we going to stand for com- puters creeping more and more into things we hold dear, such as breakfast? What happened to ordering breakfast, and the waitress hol- lering at the cook" a guy named Earl with tottoos on his arm "Gimme a Number Three, crawl- ing, a side of burned pig, Aunt Jemima's, roll it in dough with one of them sissy Co-Colers!" The breakfast was delicious, but that is not the point here. The point is I do not want a comput- er involved in any fashion what- soever with things I eat. "How long, Amer- ica, oh, how long are we going to stand for computers creeping more and more into things we hold dear, such as breakfast?" Computers have caused me enough trouble, losing my hotel reservations, my airplane tick- ets and payments to the electric company. "How was your service?" the cashier asked me when I went to pay my bill, "The computer botched my egg order," I said. the football fnuch to this man ly put your finger Hipp had not When he died group, decided his memory. The Park is on Main the bank and the I just left from al park. The fountaini the trees are have flowers. proud of his park. like the trash u wish everyone week's "The entitled "What Do." I well remember tion of the park, but I which year. There speakers and I was one of those. I remember poem by Rupert Soldier". The reads in part: "If I think only some corner of a that is forever En I took the a bit "...There's this field that is say, 'We are sorry bt fie to represent That was a clear Walter George, duced Roosevelt in He sat in a silence the crowd's for this The veil was dia who were paying any politics that year. "The boss has mal3 ty Democrats in will vote against because they are throu candidate at that Robert tenants were havin hag a candidate, was so strong. Eugene was thou didate, but he was Roosevelt, oughly discredited gogue. "I'm going someone, if I have to ant farmer Moore," told Farley that s (Next week: FDR Candidate) "We've been trouble with it," "Yesterday, it was hour and a half wearing a tattoo." Hearing that made lot better. By special his widow, Dedra, News is carrying columns by the Grizzard, who grew up Moreland, and widely read Georgia time. Grizzard America but he belonged to this of which he wrote so c where a portion of Newnan in his honor The LewiS Museum was Moreland in 1996, and l and editing lab is being ed to his memory at University of Georgia. Grizzard's books are still available Bad Boot ProductionS, 191266, Atlanta, GA 3J and at book and nationwide.