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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
April 1, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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April 1, 2004
 

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Opinions & Ideas T--HE"oGANSu LL EHOME NEWS Recallin Daddv Bun. Mama Willk A Grime8 l~li~ ~ ~ G~I~, Pmaiclent l:hJ BI JSt l l-~r~ D 1 TO R I~URm I.~W~S Aov~a~T~sxr~c, DmrxrroR (azrcr CtAVnROOK ASSOCIATE EDrI~)R ROB RI~N ASSL','TANT EDrrOR $AVr~ ~ B USIN~.q ]VIANAGER Phcme (706) 846-3188- Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O~ Box 426 HogansviUe, Georiia 30230 Writing an Award Winning Column I've been in the newspa- per business for 26 years and had to write a column every week of every one of those long years. I never thought of entering my personal col- umn into the Georgia Press Association's Better Newspaper Contest and never did. This yea,, the owner of our newspaper put together the entries for the Better Newspaper Contest and I just smiled when he told me he had entered my person col- umn. I thought, what a waste of time, effort and money. Over the years I've won my share of awards from sports writing, photograph to hard news and layout and design, but my column is not really a column. I think of it more like a sounding board tomyreaders.A way forthem to get to know me, the type of person I am and feel com- fortable should the need ever arise for them to contact me. I like to write about life and the experiences we have along the way. I've always been of the belief that a per- sonal column was supposed to not only be interesting ,reading, but have a life les- son built in. So, the last thing I've ever thought of my col- umn being was a "serious" one. I surely never thought it would win an award. A COUPLE of weeks ago, the newspaper office received a letter from the Georgia Press Association stating that our newspapers had once again earned some GPA awards. We have been blessed to win several awards over the last four years, including one recently in advertising. I couldn't wait to see what we had won. Was it for a good news story, another photog- rapher's award, sports writ- ing or layout and design? It took several more days before we received a letter stating that my personal col- umn had won second place in the "Serious Column" diVi- sion. \ Since most of you don'f~ know this, our newspaper is judged along side most news- papers in the state. Some are larger, some smaller, some have bigger staffs, some smaller, but the competition is tough and awards are rare. It thrilled me that I had won, even second place, but I still don't think of my personal column as "serious" or aw~trd winning that's for sure. Billy Bryant, who writes a great column each week in sports called Ball Talk, was also honored with a third place award. That I have a problem with. It is this writer's opinion that Billy writes the best sports column in the state, especially in a newspaper the size of ours. I find his Ball Talk column one of the most interesting things I read each week, and that includes those that are writ- ten by full-time sports writ- ers and editors for the state's largest daily newspapers. ANYWAY, our newspa- pers have two award winning personal columns in them each week and for our size, that's an accomplishment and one I never would have ever thought would happen. As I said, Mr. Billy's column I understand, mine is a differ- ent matter. I want to point out this column is not meant to brag or any other reason other than the one I'm about to point out. ' As I said in the beginning, I've always felt that my columns were just a sound- ing board and never thought of it as an award winning col- umn. However, it simply goes to show that sometimes, it's not the talent of the person, the beautiful words they use, or what the topic is of a col- umn that matters. Winning awards does not matter. What matters is that the readers enjoy the column each week. That's the bottom line. If I take the thee to write a col- umn, I want someone to read it and get something out of it. Ironically, many readers have called me, dropped a few lines or told me in per- son they really liked my weekly column and looked forfend to reading it each week. That makes me proud. So, while the award is nice to have, it is not the driving ~\force behind my weekly col- umn .... it is sharing with my r~mders that counts. We could line the walls with awards here at the news- paper office in any category, but if our newspaper does not help the community and our readers, those awards would- n't be worth the price it took to make them and certainly not the sweat to earn them. So, as far as the award is concerned, it means nothing unless you, the reader, approves of my column. From Lewis Griz~rd's collection "If Love Were Oil, l'd Be About a Quart Low" Written in 1979 The first year we were back with my grandparents in Moreland, my mother found a job teaching first grade in another county school 15 miles away. She would be making $120 dollars a month, a paltry sum even for 1953. She bought a 1948 Chevrolet in which to travel back and forth, and we lived on a tight budget, but I want- ed for very little. Daddy Bun maintained his six acres and a yard-full of chickens, and Mama Willie kept our table loaded. My grandmother cooked her cornbread in a rectangu- lar pan, which provided two crusty, delicious end pieces. We bought homemade butter from a man who owned a dairy, and to this day I have tasted very little of anything that was better one of those end pieces of my grandmoth- er's cornbread, lavished with a hunk of homemade butter. There were only two bed- rooms in my grandparents' house. They slept in one. I bunked with my mother in the other. We had no televi- sion. Our evenings were spent quietly in the living room together. My grandfa- ther taught me the rules of Rook, and we spent many hours playing cards on the living room floor. BESIDES TENDING to his fields, my grandfather also had part-time work at the little Atlanta and West Point R.R. shack, and he was also the janitor at my school. Rather than being embar- rassedbythat fact, I was quite proud. "Mr. Word," they called him at school, and he was up each morning before dawn, loading the stoves in each room with coal. He would leave the school after the fires were built and go to work at the railroad shack. He would return in the after- noon to clean the school, and then he would go home and work his crops. He was a totally unpre- tentious man who had known little more than hard work his entire life. When I reached the third grade at Moreland School, a new principal arrived. I was standing next to my grandfather when the new principal introduced himself. "You must be Mr. Word, the custodian I've heard so much about," he said. "No, sir," answered my grandfather, "I ain't nobody but the janitor." I LOOKED FORWARD to the summer after second grade. I had managed!~ _l out of the Garfield's entire year, and I had made some new I Danny and Bobby. and Dudley. I was to enjoy living in the ~ q lage. Adventure a "wa~ every turn. I could go f blackberry-picking grandfather. There always dogs around. to climb and ...to be BY *SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, ED COLUMNS BY GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP.~ BY MORELAND, AND B~ MOST WIDELY READ wRrrER OF HIS TIME. G~ ~ AND TA.PI~2$ ARE ~ ABUZIF~2Hg~ THR~0~[JGH ~ PRODUCTIONS, RO. BOX.~ ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Wor I remember when I was young one night while my grandmother was giving a Home Interior's show, the men folks were in another room watching "IV. What 1 remember most about that night was the movie we watched. It was about a mixed up mess of peo- ple trying to be the first to find a buried treasure. As the movie progressed, indeed it was a mad, mad, mad, mad, mad, world. Although that show was intended to be a ,comedy, there is nbthing funny about the world we live in. I am only 42 and haven't seen or expe- rienced the things some of you have, but I can only imag- ine the differences. This pest week, I was truly brought face to face with just how mixed up this world is we live in. Because of the things we find in the scripture, the things of this world should not surprise us, but sometimes it does You are probably won- dering to what I am referring. Well here it is. The first thing is something that hasn't got- ten much attention in the media, but it has a little. If you weren't aware of it, there was a push to get a license plate that was pro-life in nature. I am not sure of the details, but as usual, that idea found its way to the courts. Now you should have guessed it was ruled unconstitution- al. Maybe because of the ridiculous confusion over separation of church and state. Anyway, there are a cou- ple of things wrong with that picture. First of all, I wonder how many of you have on your vehicle a license plate with an eagle (a good looking plate at that), or do you have plate with a dog and a eat, or what abouttheolder place that says support wildlife with the quail flying off. (I have that one.) NOW, don't get me wrong. I am not against eagles, dogs, cats or flying fowl. The thing that bugs me is that the judges in this state give more sanc- tity to the life of a dog than a human Life. Isn't it true that tough laws have just recently been passed protecting the ani- mals from cruelty? Why is it that we can give more value to the lives of animals than the life of an unborn child? It is indeed a mad, mad. mad. mad, mad, world. And another thing, how is promoting the life of a child unconstitutional? Doesn't our Declaration of Independence say, 'Tee hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the~pursuit of happiness?" I wonder when the judges will rule our Declaration of Independence unconstitu- tional because it affirms that we were created by a Creator and did not evolve from some primordial ooze. The point I make is this - we give more right to life to animals than to our own unborn childrerL It is indeed a mad, mad, mad, mad. mad, mixed up world. FINALLY, to our folks in the state legislature- Why are you more concerned about protecting hunting and fish- ing than you are protecting the sanctity of marriage? I realize now that by the time this gets to the public, a~ (Wednesday, March 31 ) 595 was supposed to taken place. But, as of~ writing (Sunday night] bill is still bogged dowoi rules committee. I do hope and pray our elected officials Atlanta took a stand for1 is right and voted for Sg to be put to a vote by tbei pie of the state of Geol My question is why did deem it necessary to ta~ a bill (SR 563) proteG hunting and fishing be you took up~a bill prot~ marriage? May I sugg you it is a mad, mad, mad, mixed up Worl& Now let me say that 1 not necessarily against i ting dogs, cats, eagles, ~ other birds on our liieel plates. I am certainty against protecting the sl~ of hunting and fishing, friend, aren't there .~ important things in lifel the life of a baby more tant than a bird? Aren't q homes more important having the right to bag~ ten pointer or catch that] pounder? May I submit to~ today that if we do not| some priorities in this 1~ we are going to let some cious things get away. 50 Years O Inthe " Hogansville Herald BROOM-O-MANIA - A front pa~ article in the A~ril 1, 1954 Hogansvi~ '" Herald stated, Due to the fact that a null ber of the Kiwanis club members w~ unable to join in the big mop and brood sate staged by the dub last Friday, ano(fr! er drive on the housewives will be today." CINEMA TIME-At the Royal Theatrel itwas a week of dark. grim-tiUed or ~ chologically introspective movies.~ Offerings included "Riot in Cellblock Ii~ =Crime Wave," 'Breakdown" and "1 W~ a Male War Bride." THE H~ANSVtLLE HOM~ Ngws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publish/ng Cong~any, a division of Caia~s Publ~. at 3051 Roosevell Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40, Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $24 a year el~where. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR su~mo~q'W~,~s call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manage~. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426. Manche.~er, Ckxxgia 31816. ~l~lt: Semi address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF Publ~ and Editor ........................................................................... John Kukyendall ~l~ing Director ................................................................................... Laurie Lewis Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Chyh-ook Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goidston Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Riclmrdson ~ Staff Writes .......................................................................... Bryan Gezer. Billy Bryant Com~ifion .............................. Dewayne ~ow~, Robert Weems. Gaff Yonngblo0d Legals ..................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager ........................................................................... Tracy LynnWyatt Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................... Larry Colleges. Za&fie DiXon.Damell McCauley Mailroom Distdbetion ............................................................................... David Boggs President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charkme S. Grimes Executive Vice [~esident and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garren Legal Coun~l and Assistant Secretary .............................................. Jame~ S. Grimes WANT AD WONDERS --'For sale: Most reasonable: one cabinet radio, one table radio7 POLITICAL PROPHESY - Georgia's Democratic pdmary was held today, Lt. Gov. Marvin Griffin would wi~ the governor's race by a heavy according to the opinions expressed bY the state's county olf~em." *LOW COST OF EATING 0151" " Kulrs D~e Inn offered, for four days only, hot dogs for 10 cents each. No worry about the quality, because the ad prorn- ised, 'They're extra goooodY RETAIL BARGAINS - "Vineyard's Market advertised T-bone steak for 63 cents perpound, 10poundsof/~z@el Food Rour for 99 cents, and regular loaf bread for 15 cents as part of a l~ter eats" pro- gram.