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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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April 4, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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April 4, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs s2o.o4o A G bleao. Millard B. , President MIKE HALE. PtmI2SHADVERTISING nn JOHN KLaXE,ALL ASSOCIATE PUBLLSHERDrroR ROB RICHARDSON ASSLSTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER PNme (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 ttogarsville, Georgm 30ZY0 Seasons May Come; And They May Go Ah, man, it's almost spring again. I can tell: my cars are covered in pollen, I'm sneezing like crazy and already my lawn has that "needed attention look." Since I'm a little older, I 'm not sure which season I love the most, or should I say, "hate the most." Because it seems now that all of them affect me negatively. Winter is definitely not my favorite season'. It's sim- ply too cold for my old bones. I'm not sure if I have arthri- tis, or just aches and pains from getting older, but I can assure you that during the winter time, I hurt a whole lot worse. So, when winter strikes I begin looking for- ward to spring so the old bones won't ache as much. So, Spring finally arrives and I'm all geared up for it. Then my nose and throat begin to get scratchy. The sneezing begins and I know that the pollen count is ris- ing. To make bad matters worse, I have to spend more time outside because the pollen reeks havoc on my cars. They almost look faded because of the pollen cover- ing them. If that isn't bad enough, it's time to begin the annual yard work. Getting rid of the limbs and things you've neg- lected through the winter, cutting the grass, and so on and so on. Spring makes me sick and brings me more work. Then there's summer. Oh, those beautiful warm days that make you want to swim and get outdoors. Are you sure? If you're like me, summer is just too dang hot. You can't enjoy being outside because you sweat so bad, feel nasty, and you're eyes burn terribly as the sweat runs down into them from your forehead. All you want to do is stay indoors with the air condi- tioning turned down as low as your body can stand and complain about how hot it is and bow lazy it+nes you. Then ther fall. The most beautiful time of year. The leaves begin)o change colors, they begin to'fall, and oh no, now we have to rake them, bag them and pose of them. Energy bills begin to increase because now we're having to heat our home. It just isn't fair. + AS YOU.CAN SEE;we have semething to complain about every season. However, there are some good things about eaeh sea- son, as well. It's this time of the year when Spring Fever hits. We being to work around the house, clean up and throw out, just seem to have more ener- gy and desire to do things. Of course, summer pro- vides us with the opporttmi- ty to get back to nature. Go swimming, fishing and do all those things outside that just make us feel good. Fall brings relief from the hot summer. We can finally stop complaining about how hot it is. During fall in the south, we have the least to complain about, weather- wise. While we all complain about winter here in the south, we should be thankful. Our northern neighbors would love to have the type of weather we have during the winter. SO YOU SF, E, we have things to complain about and things to be thankful for about each season, especial- ly here in the south. But, I must admit, while I complain about the sneezing and the additional work load, Spring and fall are my most favorite times of the year. As long as the pharma- ceutic companies continue to make allergy relief med- ications, I'll survive spring and as long as I own a mower that will mulch leaves, I can handle fall. Now, if I have to live without my meds or have to rank leaves bar -handed, I might change my mind about these seasons. Just kidding. I love all sea- sons, each of them has some- thing to offer that makes life more interesting to live and keeps us going. Here are my favorite things about each season. Spring and Summer brings Braves baseball, and we all know that the Braves are the most loved thing in Georgia. Fall brings forth the greatest thing of all... FOOT- BALL. Men can't live with- out football. Winter is time for Hockey. Man, there's nothing better that to watch those guys beat up on each other. So, you see, there is much to be thankful for each sea- son. As long as there's sports, I21 survive. Tim HOC;AVnJ HOME. NEWS is punished weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Rooseveh Highway. Mancter, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 Troup, Hams or Meriwethe Counues: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansvill, Georgia 30"230. Ftm SUmCllWrlONS call (706) 846-3188 or Tite to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Pubons, R O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. : Send s changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. ST'F Publisher and Advesing Director...,.. ......................................................... Mike Hale" Associate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Bttsiness Managex ................................................................................ Jayne Goldt+ Assistant Editor .................................................................................. ...Rob Richardson Staff Writers ........................................................... . .............. Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising t.. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Dnda l.ester Cing ............. : ................................................... Dewayne .Flowers, Valinda lvety Legals ................... . .................................................................................. Jayne Goldstou Pressroom Manager ....................................................... : ................ Wayne &i Pressroom .....................................  ................................... X)avid Boggs, Larry Colleges Com, o  Pmsi ........................................................................................... Millard B. Psident ................................................................... : .............. Charlotte S. Grimes ......................................................  ................................... Laura Grimes Cofer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garreu Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - APRIL 4, 2002 Can Ufi]lg Grits Get Rid of An I was home visiting the folks in Moreland, and my stepfather, H.B., and I walked out into the front yard. Over near the driveway, I noticed a couple of large anthills. "I've tried everything I know to get rid of these ants," said my stepfather. "I even put grits on them." For a second, I thought he had said he put grits on the ants, but you'd have to be half- addled to do something like that, and H.B. is, without a doubt, of sound mind. I know a lot about grits. I know they are misunder- stood. The reason people from regions other than the South don't like grits is they have never had them pre- pared properly. THEY ARE traveling through the South and stop at HoJo for breakfast and the waitress serves them grits with their eggs and bacon. They're probably instant grits to begin with, and I'm sure it's in the Bible some- where that instant grits are an unholy hybrid of the real thing. Also, our travelers don't know to put butter on their grits and then stir their eggs and bacon into them and salt and pepper to their taste. So their grits taste awful. And when they return home, they are asked, "Did you have any grits?" And they say, "The worst thing we ever ate. Almost ruined our trip to Disney World." But grits on an anthill? "You didn't really put grits on these ant beds, did you?" I said to nay stepfather. "That's exact!y what I said. Putting grits on ant beds is an,old remedy for getting rid of ants." "Giving northerners unbuttered instant grits is an old remedy for getting rid of tourists, too," I said. "What's supposed to hap- pen," H.B. went on, "is the ants try to eat the individual little grits and they get so full they explode and die." I'VE HEARD OF other old remedies. I know if you put tobacco juice on a bee sting, it will quit hurting. I know to put a pork chop around an ugly child's neck to get the dogs to play with him, and I know if you bury a dishrag under a full moon your xarts will go away. But, again, grits on an anthill? So I asked, "How are the grits working on the ants?" "These ants," answered H.B., "don't seem to be inter- ested m grits." "Aha!" I said. "They're northern ants." "How do you know?" "Elementary," I said. 'Fhey refuse to eat grits, and look how many of them are wearing sandals with black socks." I told my stepfather not to worry about the ants. They'd be on their way to Disney World in a days. BY SPECIAL MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME CARRYING GRIZZARD, NEARBY BECAME THE READ GEORGIA HIS TIME. BUT HE GEORGIA, OF WROTE SO WHERE A PORTION FROM HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD IN 1996, AND A EDITING LAB BEIX)VED ABLE FOR BAD BOX 191266, MUSIC Use Media for Exchanging Who ever would have thought the day would come when the media would become the mediator? Yet that is whatappears to be hap- pening in these trying inter- national times. And who ever considered that columnists are in the opinion business? That's what I heard some columnist say in recent days - that we are all in the opinion business. What do I think I've been doing all these years? Actuall>; I'm not sure at this point. In 1986, when I became a columnist, all I wanted to do was talk about issues of the heart. Deep stuff. The kinds of topics that even close fam- ily members have trouble dis- CUSSing. What better medium than the daily newspaper? It enters the home every day by invitation. It is read in the most intimate of settings. In fact, I have come to believe that if you are a toilet read- er, then you've really arrived as a writer. I am told that the theory behind that suggestion is that we are such a busy society, with so many distractions, that the toilet chamber is the place to go if you want to give reading material your undi- vided attention! So, in the beginning, I wanted to throw out a subject and a few thoughts on that subject - just enough to get folks to thinking and talking - and trust that once real, hon- est communication begins, then answers will come, Honesty was the key here, not answers. SO, I chose the same method I had always used in the nursing profes- sion and the clinical setting to encourage folks to talk. I would share something about myself first and that would open the door for you to start sharing. I say honesty is most important because the answers don't always come. Even when they do come, they don always come easi- ly. Sometimes the best you can hope for is not feeling alone anymore as you search for answers that are right for you. More often, however, the answers do come. Every indi- vidual has a different take. A different point of view. Even those who live in the same household will have a differ- ent understanding of the same event. Brothers and sisters, hus- bands and wives, parents and children - all see things dif- ferently. And that is a good thing. As the different per- spectives are shared, some element of truth will begin to surface. It is when the coming together of minds and hearts produce truth that answers begin to surface in trying times. That is true in a family of two or in an international conlnlunity. What better way to share thoughts, suggestions, ideas than through the media? After years of coming under what I believe has been well deserved criticism, it is apparent that the American media is trying to redefine itself. Some of the major net- works and a number of national and international newspapers and magazines have begun to rise to the occa- sion. They have clearly begun to separate themselves to some degree from vhat we , the public has recognized for years as their own agendas. Add to this the fact that we now have a president who appears to mrtant decisions based on the high- est and best information afforded him, and not on the tide of public opinion, and clearly one can see that America, if not the rest of the world, is going through a great change. Political change. Cultural Moral change. change/renewal? Time will tell. For now ionated ing times. I willcontinue tot way in the world I will do it on a done it. who; and protect, to those who ca[ of need. No barrier can blessings from reaching those they are Wherever you or ones are today, within reach of' inn rI In.00e ogansvlue to the _.. Red Cross Drive 6oes Top" In Hogansv:dle T.R. Lions drive. lected f r Pamol! .E Nati the Legion,: speak Ho High a John Post Amo L e will week Hogs', High