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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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April 7, 2005     The Hogansville Herald
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April 7, 2005
 

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O1)inions & Ideas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2005 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS t USPS 620-040 i " A Grime Jublication Millard B. Grimes, President JOHN KUYKENDALL PUBLISHER/EDITOR LAURm LEWIS ADVERTISING DIRECTOR CLINT CLAYBROOK ASSOCIATE EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Think Movies are Bad? What About the Internet! It happens everywhere. You can't keep those bad sites on the internet from showing up on your computer. I don't care how hard you try. Our newspaper has never received what I call internet trash before, that is until a couple of weeks ago. I sat down at my comput- er and opened the e-mail. I was shocked when some things came through I didn't want to receive. So, like an idiot, I found the button that you are suppose to Click to stop it from coming. Bad choice. I later found out that is how these people keep that stuff coming to you. When you respond to tell them you don't want to receive their trash it is simply verifying that you address is a real one. Since then, I've taken actions to stop it and we have stopped most of it, but unfor- tunately not all of it. My point is, it does not matter how hard you try, you can't always stop the trash you don't want from coming through your e-mail. I don't have children at home, but it made me think for a moment. There are plen- ty of children today that have computers in their rooms that probably are never che(cked by a parent or are not checked very often. Not a good thing! So, I started readingp on pornography on the internet to determine if children can get it through their comput- ers. Guess what I found out. I won't even insult your intel- ligence with an answer. RECENT RESEARCH indicates that one if five chil- dren using the internet regu- larly is approached for sex. Furthermore, the anonymity of cyber-porn creators and sharers puts children at an even greater risk of being exposed to sexually explicit material. Not only that, children can log onto some sites by using a false birthdate and showing that they are over the age of 18. I started thinking, what are some practical ways that parents can take to keep their kids safe while they are surf- ing the Internet? There is no easy answer, let me tell you. However, here are a few tips that could help you out and things to watch for: Of course, the first thing is, ff possible, to have only one computer for the entire fam- ily to use. That way you can check the history of the com- puter and see what sites your children are visiting. It's also a good idea to make sure that children are not allowed to use the Internet without parental supervision. That is often impractical, so use the concept of supervision. In other words, tell your child you will be checking and if porn shows up on the com- puter it will be taken away. A child is far less likely to bring up questionable material if there is a chance of easy dis- covery. Be sure that your child does not have a higher level of understanding in comput- er use that you do. If you have to take a few classes or pur- chase a few books, then do so. If they know they can out smart you and keep things hidden, they will. Watch for signs like the child becoming more curious about sex, the human body, etc. From the start, set house rules and guidelines for the use of the computer and stick to them. Discuss the bad things about the Internet with your child and help them to under- stand that pornography is a bad thing and should be dvoid- ed. Check to see if your Internet Service Provider provides a filter. If not, you must absolutely install a fil- tering or monitoring soft- ware. If you ever become con- cerned that your child, or anyone else for that matter, is being deceived by someone on the Internet or is viewing harmful material, approach them calmly and mention your concern. There are plenty of oth- ers, but you get the picture, everything is just good old fashioned common sense. The things that parents know instinctively. IF YOU WANT to learn more about dealing with bad things on the Internet, or how to deal with other problems that face families today, let me suggest a site to you. One of the best sources for family information is the Georgia Family Council. You may visit them on-line at www.georgiafamily.org or # call them at (770) 242-0001. They offer information on hundreds of family related topics and have many other resources to obtain informa- tion from. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Hmxis or Meriwether Counties: $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR SUBSCmeTIONS call (706} 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. P. O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STW Publisher and Editor ............................................................................ John Kukyendall Advertising Director. ................................................................................ Laurie Lewis Associate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Assistant Editor. .................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers. Robert Weems. Gaff Youngblood Circulation Manager. ............................................................. . ........... Tracy Lynn Wyatt Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon.Damell McCauley _ Circulation Distribution .............................................................................. David Boggs CORPORATE OFFICERS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer. ....... .; ............................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Paula Had Moved On; They Divorced We sat in her den, Paula and me and her mother and father. It was awkward. Paula's parents, despite our troubles, always had treated me with kindness. They had listened to my promises, too. A few too many Jack Daniels, and ! would call and talk to one of them, and I would end up crying over the phone, and I would hate myself the next morning. But they seemed to understand. I gave Paula the coat. She gave me a cigarette lighter. I asked if we could go for a ride. I dreaded spending Christmas Eve without her. Maybe I could convince her we could spend the night together. We weren't divorced. Our parents would understand. We drove around Moreland, around the church where we were married, around the school where we first met. we parked along- side the baseball field where she had watched me play. I took her hand. I spoke quietly and deliberately. 'VCe can't let this get away from us," I said. Wqe've been together too long. We will never find anybody else to love as much as we love each other." She listened without speaking. I droned on and on, searching for the right phrase, the right word to con- vince her we belonged togeth- er. I made every promise that came to my mind. "I was wrong," I said, 'but I didn't know any better. I had to find out there was nothing to life without you. And there isn't. I know you know that. You've been alone too...." I paused in mid-sentence. It came to me that fast. All these months, I had thought she was simply afraid that I might look elsewhere for affection again. I thought she was trying to test me, to see whether or not I really had changed, to see if I really did love her and want her as much as I said I did. But that was- n't it at all. What a fool I was. What an idiot. "What's his name?" I asked. She told me. I asked her if she loved him. She said she wasn't sure. She said he wanted to marry her. I sud- denly had trouble breathing. I asked her when it had hap- pened. She said they worked together. After I had left her, she went out with him a few times. She had been so con- fused, so lonely. I asked why she had allowed me to stay when I came back. She said she didn't know why. I asked her if she continued to see him after I came back. She said occasionally. I asked her about the night I cooked spaghetti and sat there drinking Jack Daniels and listening to Faron Young and she didn't come home until 11 o'clock. She said all they had done was talk. I asked her if he was the rea- son she had moved out. She said yes. I asked her if I could spend the night with her. She said no. Late Christmas Eve night, my mother walked out of her bedroom and came into the living room, where I sat on the couch., staring at Miracle on 34th Street. "Did you talk to Paula?" she asked 'e talked." "Do you think you will work things out?" "I don't think so." ,'Are you sure there is nothing I can do?" "Put your arms around me," I said. I cried on her shoulder. "I should have treat- ed her better," I sobbed. WE DIVORCED. Paula got the dog. I got my Naugahyde couch and chair and ottoman. She got the stereo and all my records. I missed her. I missed the dog. I missed Faron Young. She married soon after- wards. She moved out of town. She had a baby. ...to be continued next week BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS IS CARRYING SELECT- ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP 1N NEAR- BY MORF_J.AND, AND BECAME THE MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD'S BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAIL- ABLE FOR SALETHROUGH BAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NATION- WIDE. My Favorite National Hero, Roosevelt The earliest President of the United States I can remember is Franklin D. Roosevelt. His name was treated almost on the level as God for bringing our country out of the terrible depression of 1929. I cut my eye' teeth being taught to respect the Roosevelt name and never believed the Republican Soothsayer's message that Roosevelt led us into a war that improved our economic conditions. The excitement in our rural Clarke County home was rampant in the early 30s during Roosevelt's first cam- paign for president. I remem- ber thinking that the south had gained some measure of revenge for the atrocities of the Civil War, as explained by my grandfather. Honestly, I cannot recall a single soul who would admit voting republican until a favorite first cousin married a Yankee "from Brooklyn. Voting republican was the only Yankee trait he brought south with him, but as Grandpa said, 'vVe have plen- ty of democratic votes to kill any republican vote he might cast." It is hard to believe it has been 60 years ago this month since I was a"boot" sailor who had just been assigfied duty on my first ship awaiting sea duty in the Pacific. It was here the shocking news came that President Roosevelt had died at Warm Springs. I wasn't overly concerned as I remember, but I did recall my grandfather's statement about the war when I joined the Navy. He told me he was- n't concerned about the war as long as Roosevelt was President. MY MIND WENT back to 1936 when I was 10 years old. Roosevelt was seeking a sec- ond term. He was coming to Athens for a speech at the University. It was a great day ::? : !]iii:iiii iii;ii!;i: i i '.ii : :.i...::.::!:*-:.:':::.:..:i{ # ::::::: ........ ::::/:::: ::::::::::::::::::::: in Athens, and our mother arranged for our entire fam- ily to visit one of her friends who lived near the Seaboard Depot in Athens. She would not let this opportunity pass for us to see this great man. Even today I can remem- ber President Roosevelt rid- ing up College Avenue in Athens, seated in an open top automobile, acknowledging the crowd with a big smile and waving arms. Little did I realize that day in April in San Francisco the next year and a half I would experience the most exciting time of my young life. We would sail from Frisco to Pearl Harbor, where we would learn the war in Europe was over. Then on to the Philippine Sea and a part in destroying what was left of the Japanese Navy. When June 5, 1945 rolled around, we were off Okinawa to supply air coverage for our pre-invasion force when we clashed withthe greatest thisof the Pacific. It was here we lost all but one fighter plane, Martha, in the storm that forced us back down to Guam for repairs, and get ready to go to Tokyo and the signing of the Peace Treaty. Even today I think about President Roosevelt with fond memories, maybe not with reverence my folks had, but no doubt my national hero. I hope my grandfather never finds out I have voted Republican several times since he passed away in 1950. 50 Years Ago l::: B In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor to the Hogansville Home News "'. L*dy Wresffers ...... :. "" :,.i i ' r* Veror,n Here L' ':..?'?.:.i $ardy Ni .................... !:;:"::" ......... .....  !!:.!i!....: .:!::!:.:........,.: .... .: :,.:::.. :!,.:.':q ',. ame, T : :"":::.::::.... ::: :":. ii :: ..: ,:..,,.,,.=: .,.::.. ........... :or  {=!:Z*.} , ...... : ........ *BIG GATHERING- The top story on the front page of theApnl 7, 1955 Hogansvi/le Hera/d was an upcom- ing chamber of commerce meeting. "The Hogansville Chamber of Commerce officers, directors and members will attend a meeting of the organization next Tuesday evening in the community building, it was announced this week by C.O. Lain, president. Mr. Lain in his announcement stated several mat- ters of urgent importance would be discussed." NEAR TRAGEDY "Two Hogansville girls are in City-County Hospital in LaGrange suffering from injuries sustained late Tuesday after- noon when they were struck by an automobile."Alarmingly, a shoe from each of the girls was found on the roof of a nearby 12-foot building. The motorist was charged with driv- ing under the influence. COLD WAR PARANOIA - A pub- lic service message sought plane spotters for the civil air patrol. "In the event of a surprise air attack, the trained civilian plane spotter would be of vital importance both to the Air Force and Civil Defense. ,,CINEMA TIME - For the most part, it was apparently action film week at the Royal Theatre. Offerings included "Challenge the Wild," "Gunfighters," "Battleground," "Many Rivers to Cross" and "Chief Crazy Horse." Anyone not enam- ored with cowboys, guns and wilder- ness could buy a ticket for "Naked Alibi."