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Manchester, Georgia
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April 20, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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April 20, 2000
 

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I THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - APRIL 20, 2000 A GamB 1blion Mil B. Gd m MIKE I'hm PUBLIsmADVERTLSG DIRECTOR JOHN KVVKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISITOR BRYAN GETER ASSOCLTE EDrroR JAYNE GOWN BUSINESS lVIANAGER mQ Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 A Special Week For Preachers Easter Week is always spe- cial for Christians. Many preach- ers have been preaching about the Cross and the events prior to the Crucifixion for several weeks, now. I can picture Jesus entering Jerusalem for the final time. He stopped on the outskirts of town the Bible says and began to weep. Surely He was thinking about the sins of Jerusalem and the world and death which would come to them. Then I think He thought about the superficial reli- gions of that day and then the judgement which would follow. Jesus knew His earthly days were numbered and the Cross was in front of Him. I can see Him in the Upper Room with his twelve disciples. There He took the bread and break it and said take, eat this my body and gave the wine and said take, drink this is My blood of the New Testament which is shed for the remission of sins. There He said one of you will deny me and one of you will betray me. wash his hands of the matter. Jesus went on to Golgotha. A crown of thorns was placed on His head, nails driven into His hands and feet, beaten with a cat- of-nine-tails, 39 times that you couldn't tell that He was a human being, curse, spit on and much more. He was placed on the Cross between two theives. One rejected salvation and the other repented and asked Danger of Educating A Sooner or later, I knew a bunch of schoolteachers would decide athletes hadto study and become educated like the other students. This, of course, is what has happened in Texas-of all places - where the "no-pass, no-play" rule has gone into effect. Other states, I am certain, soon will follow Tex_as's lead. I don't think we have thought this thing out. As a matter of fact, I believe we may be making a ter- rible mistake in insisting school- boy athletes become educated. There are several reasons I believe this: 1. Students who aren,t ath- letes have enough trouble as it is. I mean, how many dates can you get off your annual Science Club project? About all these students had to look forward to was the future, when, because of their superior grades, they could expect to get all the good jobs with IBM while all the dumb jecks would end up working at dumb jobs. If we insist athletes learn while in school, then the other students not only won't have dates, but they also probably will lose out when the IBM jobs are up for grabs. Let's face it. If both applicants have the same grades, who is IBM going to pick, a former all-state quarterback or some wimp? 2. If we start educating ath- letes, we could wind up with a lot more politicians like Jack Kemp. 3. How many athletes are going to continue to play such games as football if we teach them to think for themselves? Football is a fun game to watch, but it really can't be that much fun to play. You run around out there and large people are trying to knock you down to the ground. Football players have to learn such uncomfortable tactics as "playing hurt,"and "sucking it up." Plus, you can get a variety of rashes and diseases hanging out in locker rooms." What intelligent person is going, as the coaches say, 'o pay the price?" Educate our athletes and most of them will quit playing ball and start hanging around playing video games with the other stu- "Football is a fun game to watch, but it real- ly can't be that muchfuntoplay." dents. 4. Give an athlete a quality education and he might start say- hag intelligent things to the media. As it is, the media can simply make up quotes for athletes because they always say the same things.  "Well, you know, know, God gave me, the talent, you know, game, you know, know, need any Jesus to remember him when He came into His kingdom. Jesus promised him that, 'Today shalt thou be with Me in Paradise.' Jesus saw HIS mother stand- ing by the Way and made prepa- rations for her as he said, "Woman, behold they son and to John he said, 'Behold thy mother.' Judas lscariot was the betray- Then He cried, 'Father for- er, ashe !d [j&s fpr 30pieces: v4/rrtmm ,,tt, knOWnntwhsa of silver or.about $52 as some th"ey do--.;-' ...... - ....... commentaries states. The money didn't satisfy ( money never does) Judas and he went out and hanged himself. Peter denied the Savior, went and wept bitterly. He later repent- ed and served the Lord until his death. After the Lord's Supper, Jesus went with the eleven disciples ( Judas was gone) to the Garden of Gethsemane which was locat- ed just outside Jerusalem. He left eight on the outer edge of the garden and took three, Peter, James and John with Him into the inner garden to pray. He left them and went deep- er into the garden alone to pray. But the three fell asleep. He prayed all night until HIS sweatdrops became as drops of blood. It was at Gethsemane that Jesus suffered much agony and there they arrested Him early the next morning. The mob came with Judas leading the way, took Jesus before Pilate and other kings. They couldn't find any fault in Him and Pilate even tried to . What hurt Jesus more than the nails or the crown of thorns was the separation from His Father as God turned His back on Jesus as He had become SIN, yours, mine and the whole world (God cannot look upon sin). Jesus cried with a loud voice, 'My GOd My God, why has thou forsaken Me?' He cried, 'I thirst' and they gave Him vinegar. In a little while He cried, 'it is finished' and he bowed His head and said, 'Father into thy hands I commend my spirit.' Jesus died and He went through Death, Hell and the Grave for you and me. They played Him in a bor- rowed tomb but three days later, on Easter Sunday morning, the ladies went to the tomb to anoint his body with precious ointments but, PraiSe The Lord, the stone was rolled away and Jesus was gone. The angel said, 'He is not here for He is Risen.' Yes, today Jesus is alive and we have something to celebrate and be thankful for--- Our Savior! you know, get in with my agent." 4. if we, where will our TV from? 6. Educate and today's coaches jocks, will nicate with their more. COACH: were you thinking you made that play?" 7. If "no-pass, spreads, there dumb jock jokes where sive guard how there are ina year, andJ contemplation, he "Twelve. January February second," NOR DID the senator make Roosevelt the only meddler. In a major speech shortly after Barnesville, the tobacco town of Waycross in far southeast Georgia, he attacked White House advisers "Tommy Coreoran and Benny Cohen, two little Wall Street lawyers who had arrogated to themselves the power of saying who shall be senator and who shall not be senator." (Coreoran, in fact, may well have been the man behind the purge.) He also attacked John L. Lewis and "James Ford, the speech since the race. Talmadge's off his coat trademark, red galluses) roll up .before his tirades. hottest Georgia day, to legend, George even unbutton his speech, outdoors So his paign rhetor ""lTte people o] to Georgia do not need his to be told by the beat, Georgians President of the mitting to outside Yankee outside United States whom purge," he said, "is tO l?ote for. " march through antilynch bill Negro nominee of the Senate was Communist party for vice pres- glorified." ident," and E.L. Oliver of the "so-calledNon-Partisan League" who "demanded that I vote for the reorganization of the judicial branch of the gov- ernment." WALTER GEORGE was a dignified country gentleman who had to be chauffeured everywhere because he never learned to drive a car. Where Eugene Talmadge, the third candidate in the race, was famous for his personal attacks on his opponents, George was famous for not making speech- es of any sort in his own behalf. He had not had to make a stump MARGARET author of Gone with a supporter of friend that "since Barnesville speech, heard so many yells( rights, and sion, and sini: of power, and so playing Dixie, that I dered whether this 1861." Miss Mitchell Connecticut before primary that "for the years that I can there's a real issue i Inheritance Not For Sale THE HOCANSTRa HOME NEWS is lmblished weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FoR strsscmr, noNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, C_ 31816. POSTMAS'rI" Send a&lress changes to E O. Box 426, HogamviUe, GA 30230. Srv Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykndall Associate Editor: ................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayr Goldston Staff Writers .........................  Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda l.ester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ..................................................... VaIda Ivvry, Dcbocah Smilt Lzmren King Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ..................................................................................... :...Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Cochowski Commz Omm:m President ................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ..................................................................................... ..Charlotte S. Grim Secretary ...................................................................................... , ......... Laura Caim Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Cain Legal Counl and Assistant $at/y .................................................... J S. Cainu The Bible says in I Kings 21:3, "and Naboth said to Ahab, the Lord forbid it me, that I should give the inheritance of my fathers unto thee." This is a verse from an account about a king who tried to talk a man out of his inheri- tance. The king was wicked Ahab and the man was Naboth, the Jezreelite. Naboth had a vineyard that was passed down to him by his forefathers and because it was close to the king's house, the king tried to buy it. No matter how hard the king tried, no matter what the king offered, Naboth would not sell out. Eventually, King Ahab's wife, Jezebel, had Naboth killed in order that Ahab could have the vineyard. WE IN AMERICA have been left a great heritage, but unlike Naboth, it seems many are sell- ing out. Just as Naboth was offered "something better," Americans are being offered "something better." We are told it is "better;' for mothers and doctors to murder babies, for our government to break all ties with the Bible, for our children to make their own decisions, and for our society to allow all kinds of perversions. iiiii!ii!i00 0000ii00:ili iliil :i These better things come to us in the names of choice, progress, tolerance, diversity, free speech and alternate living. In the narrative from I Kings, Naboth basically told the king that his inheritance was not for sale. DOES MODERN AMERICA, does the peach state of Georgia, or does the wonderfully quaint little town of Hogansville have any Naboths that will stand up and say, "My inheritance is not for sale?" In the village, on Main Street, on the city's outer limits, may those who are saved by the grace of God stand like Naboth and not sell out what God has blessed them with. Any true student of history will affirm that our great nation was founded upon the est nation on the stand upon the made her great. sign on our world they cannot Every church has a place that claims the Word of church_ It is imperative not sell out their citizens and that Christians their Savior. NABOTH DIEV what was left to Americans have died what was left to her. be to that we left? It would be a die for the cause not be willing to (Jesus) unless we live for him." BUT CAMP WAS correct in saying that "If you want to help the President, vote for me." He was, as he said often, "100% for the New Deal." But it was not correct to say, as he also did often, "The issues in this cam- paign are clear and simple: do we want to go along with a national program or do we want to go back to the days when the When the President attacked Sen. Walter George for his behavior in Congress, he was reacting to the Georgian's votes on a few key Roosevelt mea- sures-the Public Utility Holding Company Act, the Wagner Housing Act, government reorganization and, principal- ly, minimum wage and hours bill. But George had voted for many key Rcoseveltian propos- als. He supported the Tennessee Valley Authority, the National Labor Relations Act, the Agricultural Adjustment Act, Social Security, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the NhtionalRecovery Administration. He was a thorough-going con- servative, an ally of big busi- ness, more and more after 1936, but he was no reactionary or one-dimension puppet of the special interests. In fact, George often called himself an advocate of "liberal democra- cy." program of the national gov- ernment was only to help big business?" If it had been that simple, then George might have lost. You have to say "might have," because George did a master- ful job of diverting the public's attention from any substantive, legislation-related issues. He made Roosevelt's intervention the main issue. "The people of Georgia do not need to be told by the President of the United States whom to vote for. That is their business. We are capable of managing our affairs without outside help from the President." Roosevelt had a home in Georgia, of course, but George took that head on, too. "I'm a full-time Georgian, too!" FDR's Toughest Campaign