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Manchester, Georgia
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April 24, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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April 24, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGA:J=V00LL, - HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A (6rhnt lublkation Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE HA PU BLISt-IER]AI)VERTIS IN G DIRECFOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBIJSt 1ER/EDITI)R ROB RICHARDSON ASTAN'r EDH'OR JAYNE GO)N B USINFSS MANA(;ER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 } logansville, Georgia 30Z30 Another Year Older, But None the Wiser Last week I celebrated another birthday. Each year at my birthday, I think of the words my grandmother used to tell me... "With each birth- day comes more wisdom." Well, I hate to tell my grandmother this, but I don't think I'm getting any smarter with age. As a matter of fact, I think maybe it could be just the opposite. Here are a few things I have learned howev- er about birthdays. At the age of ten we all want to be teenagers. We just can't wait to become a teen because we figure that free- dom will accompany the teen years. At age 15 we await num- ber 16. With that age comes our drivers license and most certainly, independence. When 16 finally arrives, we can't wait for our 18th, because that's when we'll graduate and most assured- ly receive the independence we deserve. At age 18, we can't wait until we turn 21. At this age, we are finally an adult and can stand on our own. We can drink and all sorts of other things and finally get our independence and freedom. At age 21, we finally get the independence we've always wanted. It's loads of fun until age 25 and we're strapped with responsibili- ties, then we wish for retire- ment age. Finally we hit 30, things are going well. We have a spouse, children, a home, a car, a good job and we're active and having fun. Then comes 40. All of a sudden, we don't remember things as well as we once did. The old body aches a lot more. And we find ourselves wish- ing we were 18 again. Oh the things we would do different in life if we could just be 18 again. EVERYONE ALWAYS told me that life is all down- hill after 40. I thought they were just kidding, but it seems they were telling the truth. With all the great things that have happened to me since turning 40, I simply can't wait until I turn 50. Of course being only a few years away from 50, makes we want to be 18 again. My God, when I was 18 I thought that was ancient. Today, I keep telling myself.... "You're really not getting old. You're really not getting old." So close to the half cen- tury mark, you would think I would be much wiser. At least using the theory my grandmother did. I've found that I remember a lot of things, well maybe not as much as I used to, but still a lot, but I'm not sure if I'm any wiser. Well, maybe just a little. Let's see. I've found out that an aspirin a day helps pre- vent heart attacks and strokes. I've learned that Ibuprofen is good for muscle and back pain. I've learned what bifocal glasses do. The list could go on and on. So, I guess my grand- mother was right in many ways.., we do get a little wiser with age. ACTUALLY I'M JUST kidding arou0d a little. I'm still as active as ever. Still have lots of fun with my grandson, my dog and of course, cleaning the house and the yards. I'm still able to work out, if I choose to. While I do wear glasses and contacts, my eyesight is not that bad. All in all, life isn't all that bad, except for the few addi- tional aches and pains. However, I'm not sure if that comes from being older, or from being stuck behind a desk and not being as active as I once was. But, as the old saying goes, "just like fine wine, things get better with age," I guess many things in my life are better than they were when I was 20. There is a point to this col- umn, and if I haven't bored you to death by now... I'm going to share it with you. The truth is, we go through life wishing our lives away. We wish to be older, we wish to be younger, we wish to be richer, we wish to stronger, and so on and so on. I've decided it's time to stop wishing. Life is too short for all of that. Other than our relation- ship with God and our fami- ly, there are only two other things that are important in life. Those two things are to be happy and content. So, we should stop wishing our lives away, find what makes us happy and go for it. If we don't, one day we'll find we're too old to find either. THE Hi;ANSVUJJ': tioM: Nt:xvs is published eekly by the Stu-Mcrcury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Rtx)sevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. U SPS 620-(M0. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Peri(xlical postage paid a! Hogans ille, Ge(ngia 30230. FoR suItsCltlVrlor; call (706) 846-3188 or write to Cin:ulation Managel: Stw Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. PCYSTMAS'TEI: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogmlsvillc, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager .............. Jayne Go dsl ) i Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... RobRichardon StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bo'an (;etet; Billy Br?ant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Composing .................................................................. Valinda Iveo. Dcwa3 ne Flowers Legals ...................................................................................................... Ja ne Goldston Circulation Manager ..................................................................................... Judy Crews Production Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jc Assistant Mama er Way e G "ocl)wsk , g ............................................................................ Pressroom ........................................... Damell Mc('aulcy, Jocy Knighl, Larry Colleges CORPORATF OFFIt'FRS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grinms Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Gdmes Garret! Legal Counl and Assismn! Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PACE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - APRIL 24, 2003 Den Mother of Country Music Written in 1979 Bess ran a beer joint in with peopleand NASHVILLE -- They put Tootsie Bess to rest on a snowy hillside in Nashville qhesday afternoon. When she died of cancer at 64 the other day, they should have lowered every flag in the city to half- mast. She was somebody. She was the den mother of coun- try music. Without her, there might not have been the stardom and the music of people like Tom T. Hall, or Kris Kristofferson, or Roger Miller or Johnny Rodriguez or Hank Williams, or any number of pickers and singers who have made what otherwise would have been nothing more than Chattanooga North into a multi-million dollar record- ing Mecca called Music City, U.S.A. Without her, many who stayed and finally caught their dream might have long since caught the next bus back home. Like a man said at Tootsie's funeral Tuesday, "You can find rhinestones and applause in Nashville, but before you do, it can be the loneliest place in the world." Hattie Louise "Tootsie" Nashville at Fifth and Broadway called Tootsie's Orchid Lounge. There was a back door. It let to an alley that led to the stage entrance of the old Ryman Auditorium, for years the home of the Grand Ole Opry. Grant Turner, the Opry announcer, said, "You could leave Tootsie's and 7:58 and still be on stage at the Opry at 8 o'clock." So many did just that. When Tom T. Hall first came to Nashville, he nearly starved. Tootsie fed him. Tootsie encouraged him. Tootsie gave him pocket money. Today, Tom T. Hall sells millions of records and trucks on television. Kris Kristofferson worked construction and swept floors in Nashville while trying to peddle his music. He was one of Tootsie's pets. She kept him going until another star was born. Roger Miller was a Nashville bellhop: He would write one of his biggest hits, "Dang Me," in a booth at Tootsie's. "She ran a beer joint," said Tom T. Hall, "but to young songwriters and musicians, she was a small finance com- pany, a booking agent and a counselor." I was in her place only once: But I remember the beer being cold and the atmosphere being warm and Tootsie saying as my party left, "Y'all come back when you can stay longer." HER JUKEBOX had mil- lion sellers. It also had non- sellers. When nobody else would play a youngster's record, Tootsie would put it next to "Hello Walls," and give the kid the best chance she could. She kept'order with a hat- pin. Get rowdy and out you went at the point of her hat- pin. Come back tomorrow and apologize and all was forgiv- en. There were five inches of fresh snow on the ground in Nashville Tuesday. Still, the funeral home was packed The registry was try music who's who. Roy Acuff sat down I for the service. One Wilburn Brothers was to him. Included in the ing family was Tootsie's in-law, who is an Opry mer. Tom T. Hall wast the pallbearers. The preacher telegram from Senator Howard talked about the loving one another and! Mrs. Bess, as he performed that task Good Book intended. It could be the Good , likes the company hearted saloonkeeper BY SPECIAL WITHHISWIDOW, NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILBJ PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 WIDE. What Do We Go Several years ago, I read a story about a man and his wife who had just been to church and they were now on their way home. During the short drive home the husband and wife began to have a somewhat one-sided conver- sation, and it went something like this. The wife looked over to her husband and asked if he saw who " smter'oan4 so was sitting with. The husband replied that he really didn't notice. Again, the wife leaned over and asked her husband if he noticed that the "Joneses" were driving a brand new Cadillac. The husband, after just a moment of thought, answered that he did not see that either. Almost home, the wife, at the point of frustra- tion, asked another question of her husband. SHE ASKED if he paid any attention to the fact the preacher had on another brand new suit. Again, the husband answered he had not noticed. The wife, now fully frustrated and aggravated, asked in a huff, "Well, then just why did you go to church?" May we that found our- selves in the house of God this past week ask the same ques- tion: Just why did we go to church? Sad but true, there are many that go to church for the same reasons that the person in our story revealed. There are many who go just to see or to be seen. Why is it that we do go to God's house or may I ask, why should we go to church? We know that the Word of od mmands every believer to be faithful to the public assembling of the saints of God (Hebrews 10:25). Our primary purpose for coming to the Lord's house is to worship our Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. The word worship literally means to depress and it'refers to lay- ing oneself prostrate. The word worship tells us that we are to make ourselves low and to lift him up. It means to give the honor, the praise, and the glory that is due our Ird. But many times when we attend church, we are caught up in everything except the Lord. I'm not necessarily speaking of things that are intrinsically evil, but good things that we have allowed to distract us from our real purpose of assembling. When a child of God enters the house of God, how can he be to Church church for the right I briefly mention things. These people sure that he will properly worship the Savior? If a person'wo6fd look in the Old Testament book of Nehemiah and chapter nine, he would find three things that would help them to be focused on the Savior rather than other things. In Nehemiah, we find the city of Jerusalem in ruins and the man Nehemiah rebuilding the walls and repairing the gates. After just fifty-two days the walls and gates were finished. The real work begins. The nation having been in captivity for seventy years needs their worship restored. Ezra the scribe comes on the scene and we find the nation of God wor- shipping again. -THE THREE THINGS about these people with a renewed focus upon the God of Heaven are three things that will enable us to go to no place in the house or in the life of a When a person is upon themselves and wants, they will focused upon the action of holiness. arated:theE, es world around them (s tion does not mean and confessed sin. In they purified because a child of God not truh fessed sin nor with l of the world upon Finally, we find these could focus upon theft because they had an bly of harmony. We focus on Jesus while sumed with grudges. We Jesus, while focused ers. The worship ual believers offering of praise, glory and reverence risen Lord. Before we doors of our next appointed time ask ourself the c am I here today? "AI IN.t'-PEI !''f TRla:OUTY WfEKt" ilLPOTT, LOCAL BOY, IN POW EXCHANI ................................ ' Floyd b New h Jln : ............................... iKiwni* Hear ' s,..., i Hopes To Be At Home i 50 Yea00 Ago.. In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor tothe Hogansville Home News AMAZING IRONY: The front page 1953 Hogansville Herald was filled with news release of an Amencan Prisoner of War. Little would ' know that exactly 50 years later, the release of PeWs would again dominate the national news. ers in 1953 learned, "Floyd Philpott is coming home! army had him listed as Pfc. Rober F. Philpott, and he number 6 of the first 30 American prisoners of exchanged in the UN agreement. But hometown and all the Philpotts at the home place on route Hogansville, know him as just plain Floyd .." RECORD: "United States Rubber Company lished another new sales record of more than $225 during the first quarter of 1953..." THEATRICS: The Royal Theatre was showing t B. DeMille's epic 'The Greatest Show on Earth.' were fifty cents for adults. BARGAINS: In 1953, Hogansville residents ing the Herald's ads would find that Penny Profit was: ing Donald Duck Mayonnaise for $.29, bacon for $.39 pound, cabbage for $.15 per head and a dozen oranges for $.29 Meanwhile, Belk's had ladies shoes for "$1.98 and up" and men's summer suits for The Miracle Basement was selling cups and five cents each, and men's sport shirts for $1.