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Manchester, Georgia
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April 27, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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April 27, 2000
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - APRIL 27, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A Gs caion Mnlard B. Grimes, Pnmldent USPS 62O-O4O MIKE HAIZ PUBLISHF.ADVERT1SING DR JOHN KV'xatmSDALL /LSSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR BRYAN GETER ASSOOATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS td/AGER mO Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansvine, Georgia 30230 Elian Removal Demonstrates Too Much Force I mentioned in my column last week that I felt the government might decide to remove Elian (a 6 year-old Cuban refugee) from the home in Miami by force. That happened Saturday around 5 a.m. when police officers armed with semi-automatic weapons stormed the home. While I do believe the father has rights and those rights should be considered, I question using force such as this to remove a 6 year-old child from a home The excuse of violence was given as the reason for using such force. What violence? As far as I know there has been no violence involved in this matter until now. It was the police officers that used violence in storming the home and waving weapons in e faces of the people living there. They broke down doors and lit- erally destroyed the home. I WAS IN Fort Walton Beach this past weekend and was able to see the local coverage of the event. It was the police officers and government officials that sparked the violence. Force always ends in violence. If the government wanted to remove the child from the home, they could have done so without the show of force they used. As far as I know,  are still living in America. Many of my family members, including my father, served in the US Armed Forces. I don't think there is a veteran alive that would agree with force such as this being used in the United States. When the photograph of that police officer waving that auto- matic weapon in the face of that child is seen around the world, I shutter to think what other nations will think of us. WHEN CLINTON'S sex scan- dal broke, I for one felt he should have been impeached. Not for the scandal, every politician has something like that in his back- ground, but for lying to the American public. The old clich$, "you can't trust a politician" cer- tainly holds true for Clinton. He Pig Polo Could Help Farm00:00 w to pig polo franc Mr. Burre and. , who admittedly b'. after a night of eF. sumption, already 1 12 rules for pig polo. Hli Palm Beach, Florida- Here at the p:layground of the richin south Florlda, you can pick up a news- paper and find reports from the polo matches on the front page of the sports section where base- ball ought to be. Obviously, polo is very impor- tant to the well-heeled of the area who drive out to the matches in their RoUses and then discuss between chukkers how difficult it is to find good help these days. I have never seen a polo match and neither has anyone I know. A friend of mine, Glenn McCutchen, says he was in Palm Beach on business once and actu- ally attempted to see a little polo. "I read there was going to be a match at the Palm Beach Polo Club," Glenn reported, "and so I asked somebody at the front desk at my hotel how to get there." "He looked over at me, turned up his nose and said, "I'm sorry, sir, but I am not allowed to divulge such information to anyone from the masses." When I asked my hotel for directions to the club, the man behind the desk suggested I go howling instead. I was quite discouraged, because the reason I wanted to see a polo match in the first place involved a humanitarian effort on behalf of America's belea- guered farmers. THIS ALL BEGAN when I received a letter some time ago from one David S. Burre, who has an engineering firm in Atlanta. Mr. Burre pointed out that he and a group of his friends were drinking one evening in a place called the High Horse Tavern and came up with a way for farmers to get out of their financial straits. The idea goes something like this: In every small town and vil- lage in America, there should be established a polo franchise. Because polo ponies are so expensive, Mr. Burre's idea is to have the game played while mounted on pigs. I DIDN't make it to the polo "PIG POLO," said David matches during my stay in Palm Burre. "Finally the layman, for a few: r' " A period is No slopping between lards, i lay No rooting, for L: "Because polo t00norothe00so,00 Umpires are ponies are so VSDAinspectors. expensive, Mr. iTHINK this Burre's idea is to it,s time we helpedU and it's time the restd have the game bers of the great played while given to oppo0000 great sport of polo, m.ounted on have to ride pigs to @i don't know wht pigs." types in Palm BeaCh polo match is over, b ' Burre's pig polo, the  K} begun when the fi e dred and fifty dollars, could own a thoroughbred type animal - a polo pig - and think of the money sounded. In pig polo, the to celebrate by coo Beach, either, small investment of three hun- farmers could make selling pigs ing the losers' mountS Bureaucrats Stuck In The Bati "I shutter to (Anotherinaseries) WhiteRepublicans, thatis. think what Margaret Mitchen and other Though Camp had been ' Georgians were fearful that regarded as a"labor man" since Sen. George and Talmadge his days in the legislature, other nations would end up dividing the "con- labor's leaders in the state and servative" vote. A number of nation were split, with George will think of us." people believed this would getting muchopensulport. occur to Camp's benefit. However, it was clear to the most astute observers, includ- ing Roosevelt, that Camp was- n't going to win anything. Candidate Camp, Bill Flythe of Augusta wrote Marvin McIntyre at the end of August, was as lackluster as Alf Landon had been in the presidential race of two years before. (Alf Landon, the Republican nomi- nee, won just two out of 48 states, in the worst American defeat up to that time.) Furthermore, he had no organization. Roosevelt's hopes that Gov. Rivers' organization would work for him as it worked to reelect (renominate, techni- cally) Rivers were dashed. Many elements of the Rivers organization in fact, worked for George. i ii i i ii over and over again and we have allowed him to do so. THIS TIME, I feel Clinton and Janet Reno have gone too far. Force such as that exhibited in Miami this past weekend is unfor- givable as far as I'm concerned. It is high time the American people stand up for what we believe in and tell the people in Washington to go to you know where. This is no longer the America I grew up loving. Today, we accept things so easily and having a President without morals cer- tainly doesn't help matters I WONDER how Reno or Clinton would like it if the American people armed them- selves with automatic weapons and stormed their homes? I certainly hope with the pres- idential election ahead, we as Americans consider what the Clinton administration has' stood for when we go to the polls and cast our votes. Tmg HOANsTmt HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 ayear elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR suasCmlrlors call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, C_ovgia 31816. Po: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. SrA Publisher and Advertising Diroztor .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................. : .............................. John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ........................ .Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assis .rant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Dcb(wah Smith, Laumn King Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager ......................................................................................... Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................ David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski T Oncns President .................................................................................................... MiUard B. Grimes "v'ce President.. ....................................................................................... Charlotte S. Secre,-y ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes GarmR Legal Counsel and Assistant Sccrty .................................................... James S. Grimes REPUBLICAN officials in the state came out openly for THE ONLY GROUP Camp had going for him was the fed- eral bureaucracy. Roosevelt saw to it that top officials of the I.partment ,0f Agriculture made speeches in Camp's behalf. Officials in several New Deal agencies in Georgia were allowed or told to work for Camp. Before the Barnesville speech, WPA wages were increased in the South. Two days after Barnesville, the WPA announced $1.8 million in Georgia projects; on August 23, $1.7 million more. In September there was a smaller grant of $101,000 plus a PWA grant of $819,000 plus an announcement that the state was going to get $990,000 for highways. There was negative aid from Washington, too. Erie Cocke, state director of the National "Even lower- level aides were being caught in the crossfire... " Dunlop, the state's Reconstruction Finance Commission attorney, was forced to resign when he sided with George. Even lower-level aides were being caught in the crossfire, according to George support- A SPECIAL SEN mittee investigated other charges and f ing specific it could a' Hatch Act, forbidd' i employees to partici itics, was the even such behavior, howe As far as Camp cerned, the Rooseve did not enforce erie infg"3" Affdr- t.$.1 complained:that  ager of the RFC in state director of t Housing Administr ! regional director of Deposit Insurance C the Atlanta Federal Board chairman, the of the Port of SaY other federal offiei worked for George. ! was dismissed. (Next week: Vind" lisher is tired.) .E SQW00 SP00NC00 IS ON GIFT SHOP AT TI4 WHITE HOUSE. IT ALL OF THE EXCEVI George, with the goal of embar- Emergency Council and region- ers A secretary at th N.f TM w rassing Roosevelt and dividing al director of the l'na-t,'h. e''"*h",:'  ED IN THIS NEWSP -. fired, accor_l.., .... ,,, ,,,,,.,, ,,., .......... the Democratic party in 1940. Reconstructmn Finance Charles Rounrro  ,,Vl,, u, rmrn. x. . . .  v,  vv v v Republicans cou!d vote m the Commission, was a George newspaper editor in FROM THE BOOKS S Democratic primary since man. He was replaced m late Wrihtsvflle bee-s, h; ...... TO THE ROOSEVELT there was no party registration. July by Clark Foreman. Edgar wouldn't sup'port-Camp  --v,-- TATION CENTER. What Is Revival, You Ask? chosen people again. Habakkuk specifi ed the Jews to stop would move in a mighty way in the meeting. As all these things go through my mind, I wonder how many have lost the true meaning of a revival? To some a revival is simply a special week of meetings where a visiting preacher comes in and preaches along with a few spe- cial singers. But, as we consider the Word of God, is this what revival is really all about? In studying the Old Testament, it doesn't take long to understand that the nation of Israel is God's chosen people. Anyone that is vaguely famil- iar with church life has heard of a revival. Listening to local radio stations one can hear of an upcom- ing revival or a revival in progress during just about any given week. I have childhood memories of room and dad carrying me to revivals at our church, memories of my grandparents taking me to tent meetings, and memories of my uncle preaching until the per- spiration (sweat) would roll from his brow. MY MIND goes back to the times when young people would bring their friends to revival meetings, when parents would get on their face in an altar and pray for their children, and when God BUT, BEING HUMAN and subject to sin, often the Jews as a nation would wander away from God and serve and even worship idols. When the Jets would do this, prophets would preach with the purpose of drawing the nation back to.God. Several books of the bible are the message of these prophets. Tucked away toward the end of the Old Testament is a little book named Habakkuk. Habakkuk sees the Jews facing Babylonian captivity because of their rebellion. IN CHAPTER 3, the prophet prays these words, "O, Lord, revive thy work in the midst of the years, in the midst of the years make known, in wrath remember mercy." Habakkuk prayed for revival. What does that mean? For what does Habakkuk pray? In short, the prophet is want- ing these Jews to act like God's against God and for mercy on the rebellingl According to this, revival is when Gee return back to the livi people. ONE PREACHFfl said that revival is red# ing signs of life. Eve  a. ".m, Ha.om k's. daY, i those who need to ret shipping and serving C many Christians 81' beneath the privilege intends for them to Christians, God has c be a peculiar people (J him and are zealous of (1 Peter 2:9). There is ! joy and no testimony as Christian who live would have them to. Real revival is more a week of special pr singing. Christ pro can have abundant - Christian and reviv God's people once new life they have ill their Savior.