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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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May 1, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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May 1, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 . (6rimed Jubliatkm Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE PUBLISHF3]ADVERT1SING DIRF:CrOR JOHN KUYKENDAIJ, ASSOC1A'IE PUBI,ISHER/E1)ITt)R ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT El)l*l't )1{ JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINEKS MANAGER l'hone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 I O. Box 426 I togansville, (;eorgia 3i)230 But I Do Have Auto Insurance I learned something new today. Even though I have insurance on my cal, if stopped I could be charged for not having it. Doesn't fig- ure, huh? This tidbit of information was given to me by my Tax Collector's office when I stopped in to purchase a tag. It's kind of a long story, and a little confusing, but I'll try to explain it. I recently purchased a new vehicle. The first thing I did was contact my insurance company because I wanted to be sure the auto was insured. However, it seems the sales- man that put together my paperwork inadvertently transposed a couple of num- ber or letters in the vehicle identificatio n numbers (VIN). The insurance compa- ny caught this when I was try- ing to make the purchase. So, I simply called them and gave them the right number as soon as I got back to the vehi- cle. Unfortunately, the change was not made by my local insurance company. So, a couple of weeks ago I received a letter in the mail telling me that the VIN num- ber did not match any Georgia VIN and I needed to provide the correct one. Simple to take care of. The insurance company provided a form to write the correct VIN number on and return. Which I did. This past week, I received the paperwork from the deal- ership to make my tag pur- chase. So, I headed out to the Tax Collector's office to pur- chase the tag. I handed the lady behind the counter the paperwork from the dealership and my insurance card. "You don't have insurance on this vehicle," she said. "I do," I said. "You have the card from my insurance company showing that I'm covered." "Yes, but the card has the incorrect VIN number. So, as far as the state is concerned, you don't have coverage on this vehicle." The office did allow me to purchase my tag, but they cautioned me that if by chance a policeman stopped me he could write me a tick- et for not having insurance. It was hard to believe this was true, so I called one of the Police Chiefs that I work with each week and asked. "Yep," he said. "Even though you have a card and can show you've purchased insurance, you could be writ- ten a ticket because the state ..................................  ! : i ,!i/'i computer says you don't." I WAS A little shocked, to say the least. As I pondered this, I also realized that when my daugh- ter purchased her van, we had the same problem. We had the same problem with a car my wife was driving. I wondered if this was something that hap- pened a lot, and if so, who was at fault? I spoke with a person at the Tax Collector's office and was told it does happen quiet often. I was also informed it was usually the car salesman that made the mistake when transposing the numbers onto a sales invoice. Then when the customer receives the paper- work from the dealership, the mistake is corrected. It seems like that is an awful lot of trouble. It would seem that if salesmen are at fault, they should spend a lit- tle more time checking and double checking the VIN numbers. HOWEVER, THAT is not the point of this column. Believe me, I'm a firm believ- er in computers. I have to be because that is what I do each and every day, work with a computer. But, I'm smart enough to realize that the computer is only as smart as the person using it. So, I try not to error whenever possi- ble. While I trust the comput- er, I would not stake my life on it, because it has let me down. It bothers me to think that if a person has proof of insur- ance in their hand, the could be written a ticket for not hav- ing insurance because a com- puter says they do not. I can't believe there are many offi- cers out there that would write such a ticket, but there are probably some that would, the ones that go strictly by the book. I can tell you right now, if I get a ticket I'm going to be hopping mad. I think before the state starts posting on a computer that a person does not have insurance coverage, that per- son should be contacted to determine if there is a mix up and an attempt should be made to correct it. TilE HO(;ANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mcrcut S Publishing Company, a division of Grimes publicatkms, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchestel; Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by nmih $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230. FOR SI;Ik'ltlFrlo.JS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercu O, Publications. P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POS'rM,KrER: Send address changes to E O. B6x 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAW Puhlihcr and Adverlisiug l)irector. .............................................................. Mike Hale As,iatc Publisher and Fklitor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager. ................................................................................ Jayne Goklston As,,istant Fklitor. ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWrilcr .......................................................................... Br)an (ieter. Billy Bty/ant As,.istant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie l.ewis Ctmposing .................................................................. Valinda Ivety, Dcwayne Flov, ers Legal', ....................................................................................................... laync Goldston Circulalion Manager. .................................................................................... Judy Crews Prnluclion Manager. ........................................................................... Bobbx Brazil Jr. A',sistanl Manager. .......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Prcssnxnn ........................................... l)amell McCaulc. J.'_', Knighl. l.an S Colleges CORPORATE OFFI('ERN Prcsidem ............................................................................................. Miliard B. Grimcs Vice Pre,,ideut .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grime, Executi',c Vice President and Secretuy ........................................ Laura (hiroes Corer "l'i'ea,,urer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett lgal Coum.cl and Assistan! SecrelaD ............................................... James S. Grime, PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - MAY 1, 2003 Debutantes No Match for Written in 1979 For the 32nd consecutive year, I did not receive an invi- tation to the annual Harvest Ball at the Piedmont Driving Club. Obviously, there has been some kind of mistake. Every year, I anxiously await the arrival of the white envelope beckoning me to what is certainly one of Atlanta's most prestigious and gala social events. And every year I am disappoint- ed. What happens at the Harvest Ball is some of the city's loveliest and tenderest and most charming young girlpersons, whose daddies also have a big stash, make their "debut" into society. I think the male compar- ison to that-- on a lower social stratum -- is your old man taking you for a beer at the VFW and letting you shoot pool with Scooter Haines who was once eight ball champi- on of all Heard County. They held this year's Harvest Ball last week and again, I had to be satisfied with reading about it in the paper. Dinner was divine the story went on. Everybody had tomato aspic with shrimp, breast of chicken, spinach souffl6 with artichokes and almond mousse and even Scooter Haines, who once went all the way to Houston for a pool tournament, never wrapped his gums around anything like that. SADLY, the closest I've ever come to a debutante ball was the annual Fourth of July Street Dance in front of the knitting mill on the square in downtown Moreland with a live band that played "Down Yonder" over and over again because that's all the band knew except for "Alabama Jubilee" which didn't play so well. What always happened at the dance was farmers from as far away as Luthersville and Arno-Sargent showed up with truckloads of daughters they wanted to marry off. Some grand old girls got out of trucks at those street dances. The only curtsying they did, however, was behind the depot where nobody could see them. We were a polite society, too. There was Cordie Mac Poovey, Cordie Mac always came in her "bermudalls." That's a pair of overalls cut off just above the knee. Cordie Mae couldn't dance a lick, but don't tell her that because she weighed a good 220. And who could forget Lucille Garfield? Lucille car- ried her pet pig everywhere she went. The way you could tell the pig from Lucille was the pig wore a hat and was the better conversationalist of the two. But Kathy Sue Loudermilk came to the street dances, too and when rWIDE. Analyzing the Double It seems since the war in Iraq began the airwaves and the printing presses have been filled with nothing but what our fighting men and women are accomplishing in the effort to oust Saddam from the seat of authority. Day and night we have been inundated with reports, opin- ions, and speculations from that part of the world. However, in recent days the news has shifted to a more home front vantage point. For a while the spotlight was taken off Iraq and focused upon Modesto, California, the San Francisco Bay area, and the mysterious events sur- rounding the disappearance of Laci Peterson. Finally, the bodies of both Laci and the baby were posi- tively identified. Just this morning the news reports said that the prosecution would seek the death penalty against the accused husband. (A punish- ment that does fit the crime.) What is of great interest to me is the fact that Scott Peterson has been charged with two murders: the mur- dering of Laci and the baby. Again, these are proper charges. As I sit and ponder the fact that Scott Peterson has been charged with the dou- ble murder, I also see a dou- ble standard. Mr. Peterson is being charged in the death of an unborn child. My question is, how is what Scott Peterson is accused of any different than a doctor does in performing an abortion? THERE IS no difference in aborting the life of an unborn child or causing the death of an unborn child. No matter how you look at it, both the death of Laci Peterson's baby and an abortion are both murder. The unborn child in the mother's womb is just as much a life as one that is out- side the mother's womb. The Bible in many places makes it plain that the child in the womb is a living human being that has life and per- sonality. The Bible is also plain that the onewh0 kills or causes that life to be taken is guilty of murder. The Bible says in Exodus 12:22-25, "Men strive, and hurt a woman with child, so that her fruit depart from her, and yet no mischief fol- low: he shall be surely pun- ished, according as the woman's husband will lay upon him; and he shall pay as the judges determine. And if any mischief follow, then thou shalt give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, burning she danced, even the er broke a sweat. blessed that limits of this timid lary. So I'll probably make the Harvest would have paid to Kathy Sue Loudermilkd ing at the Piedmont Club. One curtsy from Sue in something low cut and the whole would have been squarely on their aspics. BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, WHO BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ! GA 31118-1266 for burning, wound, stripe America is the nation upon the face Earth. She defends the! of the helpless and ors to give hope to less. But one upon this great nationi she does not stand very own unborn UNTOLD been murdered Supreme Court said legal. I don't ',kllow Peterson is ing his wife and child only Scott Peterson know the truth. It is my prayer killer will be brought I tice. Be that those wh( carry out the unborn children brought to justice as May God have upon our nation ous double standard. 50Year00 Ago. In the Hogansville HERO'S WELCOME: the front page of the April 30, Hogansville Herald the homecoming of Korean Philpott. Citizens would be Philpott's motorcade arnval of siren blasts from city hall. "A gation of Hogansville citizens at 12:55 today when Flight 101 brings the 24-year-old eran of Korea back to his Georgia." TOP MUSIC: The Parade listed Hank Williams' KaW as the number one record The Carlisles' No Help number two, and Williams' Cheatin' Heart was third." THEATRICS: The was showing "Abbott and to Mars" as well as 'Confidenc Blonde and Beautiful with every curve!" BARGAINS: At the end 1953, Hogansville residents the Herald's ads would find Western Auto was toutint improved" imperial "IV for an ing $259.95. Meanwhile, two rolls of toilet of coffee for $,83 and whole $.67 per pound. Belk's had men'S for$ Housing was cheap, too: a want ed a six-room house for rent at l month. (Fifty years later, the onlY that would end up cheaper the television.)