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Manchester, Georgia
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May 4, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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May 4, 2000
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - MAY 4, 2000  B It's ]00me To Move For00vard Aga" ted VO] iht rnc t P, ter, rill '.lat ar{ life in northern Troup County, as ANOTHER HOPEFUL sign home on Main Street. Christner of course, and there is always a There is the possibility, how- But it's time for the of Hogansville residen. met with something less than small contingent of people in ever, for enough growth to bring "no" to the nay-sayers was Hogansville's appeal to new residents, who saw restoration possibilities in its older houses and liked its easy access to the metro Atlanta area and Atlanta airport. Patrick Terrail, once the chef for Hollywood stars at his famed Ma Maisson restaurant in Los Angeles, is such a new resident. Describing Hogansville in an arti- it was 40 years ago, and for many years before that. Upscale residential develop- ments were the most exciting prospect. The Villages of Huntcliff development was one of them, and at least it i now well underway. Audubon Park, a pro- posed golf community along I-SS, was another, and it has the poten- tial to be the most upscale resi- THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS I.If 620.040 MI HAI ADVERTISING DIRECYrOR Jom KALL i0CIATE PUBLIS "tIER/EDITOR BY GETER ASSOCIATE EDITOR .hVNE GOLmTON BUSINESS MANAGER o Plmae (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 good old southern hospitality, every community who raise better jobs, a broader tax base, Ma despite buying two houses in obstacles, some valid, many not and more revenue for improved to the future. Hogansville, and attempting to valid. In fact, y6u can look police and fire protection, and for There is nothing to Cc enhance a 1907 house that was throughout Georgia and see those better schools. And, not inciden- ramshackle houses, em d close to becoming a falling-in eye- communities that have enjoyed tally, to pay down the debt and and ever higher tax : ere sore. Happily, Christner's situa- planned and beneficial growth help pay for essential changes in municipal services. q ten tion may be near a satisfactory and those that have not. the electrical, system: : y iJ solution. The difference usually is in There. is the chance for new - Millard Grime, 1 ' I the leadership that prevails - and residents who will shop in cur- and CEO, The Hog :hy BUT, NEARLY a year past whether that leadership favors or rent and future retail develop- News. WI Wh .: of How You Ya'll Be Proud beSt] vo A rma Millard B. GHmIo, Pfafldlont reports recently of Southerners going to special classes in an effort to learn not to speak Southern. I read of such classes in Atlanta, where people who took the course said they were afraid if they didn't stop talking with a There have been several to have an accent, their vocal cords are nervous wrecks?What's wrong with having a Southern accent? My grandfather said "y,all" (only in the plural sense, however, as Yankees have never figured out) my grandmother said, "I reckon." And if IBM does- n't like that kind of talk, they can same, thought the same, tq country would not be place that it is, would not II benefit of our and everybody be in the Rotary Club. WHAT WE ize is the more Southern Accent, it might impede just program themselves right the stronger we are. Pause; Then See their progress toward success.A youngwoman whoworks back to where they came from. fourtht get second and thirdiand,fifth op for IBM said, "I want to advance I LIKE ACCENTS. I like to try "I can even talk w prevent the hast: ups. Challenge Ahead through the company andI feel toemulateaccents, otherthanmY O r at least type I sayifyouareg, ! need to improve my voice..." own. I do a big-time Texas oilman: ::. .... :: what . . like Bostonians es to lose your Sour is the IBM office rks is rtmby 'cauSeusmfolkgottotalkabout youare tugy0 heritage, and I hope a bunch of northern transplants bidness." sound: "where As we journey into the 21st who probably make fun of the I can even talk - or at least working behind the century, we need to pause and way she talks, and she is embar- type - like Bostonians sound: can I pock my convenience store rassed and wants to talk like they "where can I pock my cah?" ca. , " Iranians ] do. The wonderful thing about the man. way Americans treat the English And if  6", THAT, IN MY OPINION, is language is we have sort of made another part of the make fun of the way Soul grounds for loss of Southern cit- it up as we have gone along, and Midwesterners say "mahmee talk, may you be electe  izenship. I see absolutely nothing wrong and dee-ad." What are we trying todo here? withhavi.n, gdifferentwaystopro- Southernerssav"mahmaamd nent program of your Re  / Do we all want to sound like those nounce different words, de.qdi  ,, : Club. talking heads on local televmmn New Yorkers say' mudder and Bi- deal ....... Y'all reckon I've ,, B Ix we all spoke me .) news who have tried so hard not fadder, same, dressed the same, acted the point. : FDR Fires Vindicator Publish (Another in a Series) and aRoosevelt loyalist (andCamp  " \\;  In a sense, he did den supporter), complained about f  that there was a liberal f One casualty of the 1938 earn- Revill's behavior in the primary  in Georgia. : paign was Elsie O'Neal, the ordi- to McIntyre, whoproposedtoFDR   Considering that Cat nary of Meriwether County. A in a memo that Jesse Jones, head ooo nomm]r cam al er, under- .i. " long-time Roosevelt supporter, of the RFC, fire RevilL The memo underorgufized;and- she backed Camp. In early 1940 came back from FDR with the pen- i; that Roosevelt'-s entry still she wasdefeatedinabidforreturn ell notation, "Mac, yes, will you do ........  even some of his suppO, to office, it?" | .... nativist wrath (even the,/ That spring she went to the --  _. Constitution denounced 11 a temporary White House in Warm THE FINAL NAILIn Lawrence . considering that it was a  Springs, whi'eh was always set up Camp's political coffin was money. ,or_ ' mary, thus one in whichtl- on Koosevelt visits, and asked for en. George's campaign cnests In on- liberal voices were stifll a federal job. McIntyre told James bulged with cash from utility offi- mar/e f" ,n finally, considering that.! Rowe, a staff member who ban- cers and other conservatives. He . '  g'.'  ,t.n. was a poll-tax state in 1 died political matters, "the spent over $44,000. Camp spent COUT'y regara- poorest whites who werel President rather emphatically $17,000. Talmadge spent just less ho 11 n77 supportaliberalfederal[ said that he wanted something under $9,000. These are the spe- _ .""  ''9 tration's policies and c " done' She eventu00y got a job as oomn00ttee's f00es. Georg00 cast at least two (when no race issue was) an area supervisor in the politicians estimated privately [tofl.. l'f. were alsostifled-conside:" Historical Reco ds " he t ch " her .... 9  '" e r ProJect of t hat the totals were mu hig  ........  that, the fact that Camp e,, WPA in Columbus. -and even more in George's favor. _1'- t tow pop00o.us, a fourth of the vote in a-tl" When the votes were counted, tle tar00e C.01111.711.. race was something | t ROOSEVELT OFTEN took an Georgehadwonwithl41,000votes .... '4- - -. .... "-','= " .] t interest in patronage matters in to Talmadge's 103,000 to p: ca[ Only S nlt (Next week: A pool fl| 1 Meriwether County. 77,000 (all rounded). In Geo gi otes eactt. "l"ne President.) | ' An effort that had not turned primaries then, each county, ao,a I!,,.-'' east o jr o ..,m tg/ttI gtt out too well was one long before regardless how small, east at 1  , . A PAPERBACKEDI the1938election, whichgotapart-twotmitvotes, nomatterhowpo.p-rurat aomt- THE SQUIRE OF ( time RFC job for Judge Henry ulous, the large counties cast only Y/Y/C,e " SPRINGS" IS ON SALE .' Revill of Greenville. Revill was a six unit votes each. The system g"" GIFT SHOP AT THE Pl genial 300-pound lawyer and the assured rural dominance. WHITE HOUSE. IT CO, publisher of the Meriwether George won across the board, Carny came in third thara tru ALL OF THE EX Vindicator, probably the first with 242 unit votes to Talmadge's lie wanted Geor ' ",'U:_ REPRINTED IN THIS  I ' "ed g - ann me paper to propose a Roosevelt pres- 148 and Camp s 20. Talrnadge tri South - to become more lib,--,1 rJ, PER DURING THE "fft i " n in ....... dency. In 1938, Revill was also o to reverse the vote by gett g wanted to derntmtrt  h rW PROCEEDS FROM TItE retainertotheGeorgiaPowerCo, recountsinmanycounties, butwas votersthatwouiOmaeconser" " SALE ALL GO TO T He supported George. W. E. Irvin, rebuffed. Even in Meriwether ative eon-,,. th,,u ,o,,,'" SEVELT REHABILI a justice of the peace m Greenvill County, Roosevelt was rebuffed, voting against him. CENTER. reflect on where we have been and then look to the challenge ahead. In 1900 the U.S. population was 76 million and in 1999 the population had risen to 280 mil- lion. Today Americans are living longer with with 50,000 having reached the ripe old age of 100. Those born between 1920 - 1940 called themselves, "The Greatest Generation" since more accomplishments occurred dur- ing their life span. The federal budget from 1789-1849 was $1,160, 000,000; 1850-1900 it was $14,462,000,000; 1901 it was $588,000,000; in 1917 it went to $1,101,000,000; and in 1945 at the peak of WWII the bud- get jumped to $92,712,000,000. The first trillion dollar bud- get occurred in 1987. In 1999 the budget skyrocketed to $1,730,829,000,000. The f'n-st two trillion dollar budget is estimat- ed for 2003. THE GREATEST WEALTH in history has accmnulated along with the greatest technological advances during the 20th centu- ry. In 1902 the air conditioner was invented; in 1904 ice cream came along. In 1908 came the Model T and the first paved road in America was contructed in 1909 in Wayne County, Michigan. 1914 came the invention of the brassiere followed in 1915 by the Coke bottle and the automat- m rifle in 1918. In the twenties came the band aid, scotch tape, television, dis- covery of insulin and the Lazy Boy chair. Things really got to booming in the 1930's with the invention of sliced bread, nylon, radar, FM radio and the washing machine. In the 1940's and 50's came the atom bomb, transistor, pho- tocopier, color TV, DNA, polio vaccine, first artificial satellite, Lego, micro chip and laser. In the 1960's we saw the first man on the moon, first walk in space, first open heart surgery, touchtone phone and quartz watch. In the 1970's, 80's and 90's computer chips, VCRs, space shuttle, cell phones, cloning, satellite nav/comm and much medical technology were invent- ed. But there have been some fail- ures, as well. The moral, spiritual and social societies in America have declined. Let's take control of our chil- dren, churches, homes, social and political values as we go forward. Let's pray and seek His will for our lives. HoAJsvn Hom NIs is published wkly by the Star-Mercury Puhlishing Company, a division of  Pub at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a  elsewhctcr. Pric.s include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansvifie, Geefsia 30230. FOR SUICR]PrlONS  (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, R O. Box 426, blclter, a 31816. PosrMnSrlm: Semi addm  t R O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. Publisher and Advertising  .................................................................... Mike H',de Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Associate Editor ................................................................................................ Bryan Geter Business Manager ........................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Sutff Writers ........................ Jbomh Smifl, Carol Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising  ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography ............................................................................................ Michael C. Snider Composing ..................................................... Vlinda Ivery, Deborah Smith. Lauren King Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda lvery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Prtxiuction Manager .............................. . .......................................................... Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ....................................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ............................................................................................... Lama Grimes Cofer Treasurer .................................................................. :. .......................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Leg',d Counsel and Ashalmt  .................................................... James S. Grimes We welcome your ideas., you woult likt to give us some suggestions about your newspapeL just drop tts a lille at: The Hogansville thmle News P.O Box 426 Hogansville GA 302311