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Manchester, Georgia
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May 8, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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May 8, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - 1VIAY 8, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A Grimr tliatmn Millard B. Gdnms, President MIKE I-LM PUBLISI IER]ADVERTISING DIRECFOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER]EDITOR RoB RiChARDSON A.SISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSIN1L% MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Always Stay Your Course in Life... I must have started my column this week at least a dozen times or more. Sometimes, no matter how hard you try, a personal col- umn can become a battle for a writer Try as hard as you may the words just don't flow or you have no idea what to write about. That was the case this week for me. As I sat at my computer starring at a blank screen and waiting for inspiration, moti- vation, or whatever it is a writer needs to get started I began to wonder if it really matters to anyone if my col- umn is in the newspaper. I realized that should my col- umn not appear, some read- ers might miss it but it would not be the end of the world. It was that thought that gave me theinspiration for this col- umn. Writer's block is not the worst thing that could happen in my life that's for sure. Everyone has battled depres- sion, a broken heart, loss of a loved one,' serious health problems, a financial crisis, and so on. When one of these things happens ,to us, our +world crumbles. The ques- tions is why? HUMANS ARE funny things. We think that we must be in control of every situa- tion in our lives. The truth is, we are not in control of any- thing in our life. We can not choose the per- son we love. Many people have tried, but ,it can not be done. Love is not something we choose.., it is something that happens. When we do fall in love, it can be the greatest feeling in the World. However, that quickly changes should your heart get broken. All of a sudden you go from being on Cloud Nine to being tossed and turned on one of life's many storms. Love is only one example. We can't control our health, even though we can help it along by eating right, exercising and taking good care of ourselves. No matter how hard we try however, we are going to get sick, require operations and eventually die. Not a pretty thing to think about right? The point is, as much as humans like to think we are in control we don't even con- trol the breaths we take. The good Lord up above decides when we'll take that last breath. IN ALL THE GLOOM an4 doom I'm giving you, there is also a message of hope that I want to share with everyone. When we go through those rough times, it's good to have friends and family that you can talk with, do things with and help us get over those troubling times. Of course, if those things in life seem too much to han- dle, we can always seek pro- fessional help. However, eventually we all realize this is something we have to work through on our own. We must face what- ever the problem is head on, realize that we have to adapt, and find the will to go on, get better, or change within our- selves. BACK TO THE original reason for this column. Should my weekly contribu- tion to this page not happen to make it, it would not be a great loss to anyone. It may be missed a little, but it would definitely not ranked up there with some of the things I've mentioned above. The thing is, this column appears in five weekly news- paper with a combined circu- lation of over 11,000, which means about 35,000 people each week see this column. I won't say they all read it each week, but they see it. I'm sure of that number there is some- one out there that reads my column each week. There is no way under the stars that I'm going to let that one per- son down. It does not matter that I have nothing to say, nothing to write about, or that some- times I simply don't feel like writing. I have an obligation to do so. Along with the obligation to that reader, I also must real- ize that Fm suppose to come up with a few words of wis- dom each week that can be used by he or she. So, here are the words of wisdom... "In life, you must stay your course. It does not matter if everything is per- fect in your life, or you are going through a tough battle, stay the course and pray that God will give you wisdom and strength." Now a word to that avid reader of mine. After read- ing this I'm really sure this is one column you really wish I bad left unwritten. THE HOGANSVIL1.E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 R(x)scveh Highway, Manchesler. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscriplion rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Geoia 30230. FoR su-Rmrtos call (706 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. PXTMASTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF" Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and FMitor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Gfldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richwdson StaffWritcrs .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assisttmt Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Karen Grant Composing ................................................................. Dcwayne FIowcr, Vtdinda Ivery Circulatkm Manager. ................................................................................... Judy Crews Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldslon Pressrxm Manager. ....................................................................... Wayne GrCvchowski Pressr(x)m ................................................................................................ Larry Colleges CORPORATE OFFICERS President ............................................................................................. Milkwd B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charh)lte S. Grimes Eecutive Vice President and Secretary ......................................... Laura Grimes Corer Trea.rcr. ...................................................................................... Kathy Gri|ncs G'ett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes Hotels Are Suspicious of Written in 1979 WASHINGTON -- Here I sit in a big hotel room. What fun. When I was a kid, I liked hotel rooms because I could jump on the beds. Now I like them because I can throw towels on the floor and some- body else will pick them up. Washington is full of big hotels, because it is an impor- tant city and a lot of people come from other places to work and to visit and to be politicians. I suppose the reason they always give you a booklet on security when you check into a Washington hotel is that there are lots of politicians here. HOTEL FRONT DESKS are usually manned or wom- anned by young people who are very clean, wear expen- sive clothes and have a habit of acting snooty. Whatever happened to the friendly night clerk in his undershirt reading tomorrow's race entries? There is one staggering problem in hotels today, how- ever. Hotels do not like to deal in cash. They abhor cash, as a matter of fact, along with anybody who would deface their front desk with it. I dealin cash. Credit cards are financial heroin. "May I see a credit card?" the snooty young women asked me when I arrived at my Washington hotel. "Don't carry them," I said. She called over the assis- tant manager. "He doesn't carry credit cards," she said to him. A lady behind me gasped in horror. The assistant manager called over the manager. "He doesn't carry credit cards," the manager was told. I rattled my change as loudly as possible. "If you don't have a cred- it card, sir" the manager asked me, his hands square- ly on the hips of his designer trousers, "then how do you propose to pay your bill?" Now, he had me. "Cash," I said. "American," I quickly added, hoping to regain at least some face. They wanted to see it. A HALF HOUR passed before a decision was made. Finally, after I paid in advance, I was allowed to pro- ceed to my room. They gave me a little card to read on the way up, however. It said, "Because you have made a cash payment and did not present a major credit card at the time of your arrival, our operational pro- cedures request that you make all further payments in restaurants, bars and gift shops at the time the bills are presented." How can you who carries cash? The only time accepted cheerfully in a is when you present man in the form of a tip. After the checking in I followed! bellman up to my room. He put up ,my air conditioner, and then his tip. "Got change for a dred?" I asked. "No," he answered," can get I heard some yahoo checked in using cash?' We both got a big over that. BY SPECIAL WITH HISWIDOW NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATE L GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN 1 BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC WIDE. The Meanest Mother in the Sunday, May 11, we cele- brate Mother's Day. This is a day we honor a lady most of us consider the best friend we ever had. We give her credit for any good attributes we might have, even though at times while we were grow- ing up, we might not always have understood her strict discipline. My birth mother died when I was three weeks old. My father married my step- mother when I was a year old. She never made any differ- ence between me and my two younger half brothers. After our father died when I was 8 1/2 years old, my stepmother legally adopt- ed me so there was never any doubt in anybody's mind or my mind that I belonged. We were fortunate to have our mother until she was 92. She made it possible for me to go into business in Manchester in 1959. While I repaid every cent I actually borrowed from her, I could never repay her for all she did for me. I am happy I had the opportunity to lay my hand across her brow as she laid on her deathbed and tell her my feelings. One of my fond- est memories of life was the sweet smiles as she told me, "I never knew any differ- ence." Ten years ago was our last Mother's Day with our dear mother. Our family filled two pews at her churchthat spe- cial Sunday. Pastor Ralph Arnold read a poem that day that "pretty much" described our moth- er, although I could never bring myself to describe our mother as "mean." The Meanest Mother in the World "My mother insisted upon knowing where we kids were at all times. You'd think we were on a chain gang. She had to know who our friends were and what we were doing. She insisted if we said we'd be gone an hour, that we be gone not one hour and one minute. I AM ashamed to admit it, but she actually struck us; not once, but each time we did as we pleased. Can you imagine someone actually hitting a child just because he dis- obeyed? Now you can begin to see how mean she really was. The worst is yet to come! We had to be in bed by nine each night, and up early the next morning. We couldn't sleep till noon like our friends. So, while they slept, my mother actually had the nerve to break the child-labor law. She made us work. We had to wash dishes, make beds, learn to cook and do all sorts of cruel things. I believe she laid awake at night thinking up mean things to do to us. She always insisted upon our telling the truth; the whole truth and nothing but the truth, even if it killed us - and it nearly did. By the time we were teenagers, she was much wiser; and our lives became even more unbearable. None of this tooting the horn of a car in front of the house for us to come running. She embarrassed us to no end by making our dates and friends come to the door to get u I forgot to mention: our friends were datin 'mature' age of 12 and old-fashioned refused to age of 1S and 18. is, if you dated only to school functions twice a year. My mother was a plete failure as a None of us has ever arrested or beaten his Each of my brothers his time in: country. ....... ,i And whom do you we have to blame for rible way we turned out? are right - our mean Look at all the thin missed - we never march in a protest take part in a riot, burn, cards or a our friends did. She to cated, honest adults. Using this as a ground, I tried to children. I stand a and I am filled with when my children "mean." Because you thank God, He gave 'meanes world!'" In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor to the Hogansville Home News Rain Falls To Dampen Welcome Floyd Philpott HERO'S WELCOME: Noted as "The biggest that has ever happened to Hogansville," the home of Korean War Pew got much of the front page of the May 7, Herald. Philpott had lost 40 pounds while a war, and local citizens were raising funds to buy "at least" a refrigerator or possibly, a house. NEW GRID LEADER: "The Hogansville Board has announced the appointment of Slaughter as head football coach of the High School, following the resignation of Mike who has acceped a position as athletic director of Winder School System.." AT THE MOVIES: The Royal Theatre was tising a double feature of 'Red Plant Mars' and 'F Dodge Stampede.' But the Friday night offering of the Night' must not have been too risque, patrons would also see a cartoon entitled LIVE THEATRE: The Hogansville High Sc Senior Class will present its annual play 'Mr. Lima.' The play is the story of one social climber her attempt to marry her son off to another climber. The admission is $.30. *RETAIL DEALS: J. Crawford Ware was tornado insurance. Baldwin self service was steak for $.65 per pound, Coca-Cola for $.89 per plus deposit (Remember, these were the days ties, not cans) and two cans of brains for $.25 with notation, "A lady asked me if I had any..." Crawford Jewelry a girls watch was selling for easily a week's salary in 1953. A want ad touted a tone Mercury, originally $3,373, for a price of $18 - was either a typo or the bargain of the century!