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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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May 9, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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May 9, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 62o-o4o A rimes lJubliatimt Millard B. Gdmu, President Mn HALZ PU BLISHF2tADVERTLSING DmER JOHN KtWKENDALL ASSOCtATE Ptrmasrro RoB Pd ASSISTAN'r EDITOR JArNE BUS'SS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Small Businesses Have Big Impact In rural areas like most of us livein, therearenobigchalns stores, only locally owned and operated small businesses. Sometimes, until one doses, we really do not realize how much these businesses mean to us as an individual and to the com- munity as a whole. Small business is the leader in job creation and a leader in the world's economy;because it's the embodiment of the entrepreneurial spirit striving to realize the American Dream. Small-business owners are to be commended for their for their personal achievements and contributions to our econ- omy and our community. business is so important to our day-to-day lives and our com- munity. Wthout the small busi- nesses, our community would certainly hurt etmatmfically. While small business is an economic powerhouse, but it still knows you by your first naHle. WHAT'S GOOD for small business is good for America and for Georgi Yet most people don real- ize how sigrnficant a role small business plays in our overall economy." Here are a few. Small business is sible for 51 percent of the pri- vate sector share of the nation's gross domestic product Small business provides most of the on-the-job training and exposure to the labor force for new entrants. They're also more likely to employ younger workers, older workers, for- mer welfare recipients and women The typical small-busi- ness owner earns around $40,000 Roughly seven out of 10 small business owners start their business with less than $20,000 Small business produces SS percent of the nation's inno- vations More than 75 percent of all businesses in the United States and in Georgia employ between one to nine peo01e. Nearly 99 portent of all employers sign paychecks for one to 100 employees. THE ACCOMPLISH- MENTS of ourocal small, business owners toch each of us. It's the small,business owner who employs odf neigh- bor, it's the small bdsiness owner who sponsors our chil- dren's little league team, and it's the small-business offner who is a member of the local Rotary Club or Kiwanis volun- teering to help our neediest cit- izens. Our local inerchant on Main Street or sole-proprietor working out-of-her home is part of the community fabric that makes up our commercial, civic, and social omters. You can see how small PRESIDENT BUSH pro- claimed this week, May 5-11 as Small Business Week: Where America Works. For 39 years, America has celebrated small businesses as the engine driving our econo- my, employing more than half of the private workforce, while creating three of every four new jobs in Americ Let's all take the time to thank a small-business owner this week for his or her com- mitment to our commurtity and taking the risks to keep alive and well the premise of hope and opportunity for a brighter future. Let's also remember how important it is to support our local businesses. For without our supporL the small business would fail, and as you can see, that is not acceptable, especially in the rural communities that we live in. When I spe of smallbusi- nesses, that memm the conve ience store on the corner, the resmta-ant that serves those vegetablesandlmmburgers we all eoy, the local py, the furniture store, the florist and so on and s6oa Evm dawn to this newspaper youam read. ing, 5ome people say it cost more to shop but that is not true. It cost lessto shop Iocall-y. The reason is simple. For each dollar we spend at a local business makes our local ecc omy stronger. Those few pro- riles we spend in sales tax at home keep our roads in condition, our governmmat moving, recreation fields in good shape So remember, when you spend a few more dollars at your hometown merchmt, you are in reality making your community a better place to live, work and raise a family. Please support our local mer- chants. THE HAPHVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercta'y Publishing Company, a division of Publicatkms, at 3051  Highw, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Tvoup, Harris or Medwether Coaanties; $26 a ye elwhere. Prices include all sales xes. Periodical W,tage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR suascml,r[oNs  (706) 846-3188 or v, Tite to Circulation Manage, St Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchesler, Geovgi 31816. PT.tgsl': Send address c 'hanges to P. O, Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STAW Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................ ..layne Goklst Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ IAnda Comling ................................................................. Dewayne Rowers, Valinda lvery l_egals ........................................................................................... : .......... hy Pressroom Manager ........................................................................ Wayne P-re,room .......................................................................... David Boggs,  Coileg COmT OCS President ..............................................................  ............................. .Millm'd B. Gtitms Vice President ............ : .....................................................................  S. Secretary. ......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ....................................................................................... ly Grimes Legal Counl and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANS HOME NEWS - MAY 9, 2002 Say Kind Words, No Matter A minister in England got into trouble recently for preaching a funeral and say- ing the departed was mean, never did any good, and "won't be missed." Most ministers wouldn't say anything like that at a funeral for a mass murderer. The tradition at funerals is to go soft on the guest of honor, although he or she might have been a terrible scoundrel in life. But why is that? Why should we pretend a person who has just died was not the rascal he or she was, if that happens to be the case? I remember when Loot Starkins died back home. He was a miserable old tightwad who beat his dogs. Growled at smallchildren, wouldn't go to church because he despised people, arid, on top of all that, he was a Republican. Struggling to find a few kind words to say about Loot at his funeral, the minister offered, "We should all remember we can find some good in everybody." A man stood up in the back of the church and replied, "I.x)ot Starkins didn't have a good bone in his body. He owed me a hundred bucks and I know damn well the old fool died just to get out of paying me ." There also is the matter of the minister comforting the family by saying the loved one has gone on to a better life in heaven. The preacher back home used that technique for Virgil Crabtree's funeral, but every- body knew Virgil Crabtree couldn't have gone to heav- en. He made and ran bad moonshine, got into a fight every Saturday night at the Moose Club, cursed on Sunday, and refused to bathe regularly. The preacher might as well have been honest about it and told the family what they already knew anyway, that Virgil couldn't have got- ten through the Pearly Gates with a gold American Express card and written rec- ommendations from three of the original disciples. There's an old story that allegedly is true and it also tells us that honesty is the best policy at a funeral. Some years ago, the radio announcer for the Chattanooga Lookouts, a minor league baseball team, had some time to kill before broadcasting a game in Memphis, so he rented a car and began driving around the countryside. He came upon a white- frame church where a funer- al was in progress. The announce, fortified with a few beers, went into the church and took a seat in the first pew. Several of the deceased's friends were called to the pulpit to say a few words of remembrance. The preacher, figuring anybody in the front row obviously was close to the casketee, announcer forward. "I must announcer began. know the judging so far, he must well-respected individual. "Obviously," " I can add already has been long as I'm up here i say a few words on the { 'q'ell it all, all. BY SPECIAL MENT TrH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME CARRYING COLUMNS GRIZZARD ING AND BEING OF BOOKS AND AVAILABLE THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, 191266, ATLANTA History, Science Books or Bi What should we hold to as absolute truth? Should our children be led to believe the Bible is right so long as it agrees with their science and history textbooks? Is evolu- tion a valid scientific conclu- sion but creation only a fee- ble explanation offered by ignorant Christians? In our world today we often hear of so-called intellectuals, schol- ars and experts who try to explain away the Bible as something that could not pos- sibly be true. There are those who may go so far as to acknowledge the Bible as a religious guide but not trustworthy in other more scholarly areas. I will be the first to admit that the Bible is not a science book; however, I do contend that the science found in the Bible is absolutely and perfectly accurate. The Bible is not a history book as such, but the history found therein is absolutely and positively correct. The Bible is a history book in that it gives us HIS story. We must understand that the Word of God should be our absolute authority. Even in the "LnteUectual" world of eienee, the Bible is the final authority. From the Word of God we can find several instances where the Bible stated true scientific fact while the popular scientific opinion of the day stated something else. We all have studied in school that Columbus believed he could reach the East by sailing West. There were some that actually believed he would go so far and fall off the edge of the Earth because it was flat. Long before the modem sci- entific community actually discovered the Earth was round, the Bible recorded in Isaiah 40:22, "It is he that sit- teth upon the circle of the earth." Would you believe it if someone came up to you and said the Earth rested upon the back of a giant tur- tle? In ancient mythology some actually believed that the Earth was resting upon the shoulders of a strong man. We know today that is a silly myth, but long before scien- fists discovered the Earth was suspended in space,'the Bible had already said in Job 26:7, "He stretcheth out the north over the empty place, and hangeth the Earth upon nothing." Have you ever looked up in a clear cold night sky and gazed at the stars? Scientists from long ago did just that and believed they could number them. It is recorded in scientific histo- ry that men gave all kinds of estimates as to their number. Those numbers vary from about 1000 and up. If they had only read the Bible, they would find as we know today that the stars are without number. Jeremiah 33:22 says, '"As the hosts of Heaven can- not be numbered..." I mentioned all that just to say this, the Bible is his- torically and scientifically accurate. When our children come home from school, par- ents should take enough inter- est in their children to sit down and find out what they are being taught. Our children must come to realize that they can always trust what the Word of God says. If the Bible and the sci- ence book disagree, teach them the Bible is correct and the science book wrong. Instead of judging the Bible by the science book, judge the science book by the Bible. If we hold to any of the Word of God as accurate, we must accept the whole Word of God as aeurate. It is not for man to pick and choose what he is to believe about the Bible. It is all right or we cannot believe any of it. May I submit to the reader that the Bible, based on its own claims and the proofs of its accura- cy, is indeed without fault, error or not claim but I believe it. To ma ask this understand how all mobile works or brain functions? not, but automobile will where you need to your brain of your body should. The point is'l because we stand all n't make one cising faith in it comes book, the history Bible, I will choose every time! Why ao to the in is next the 1952 seasoo i Dunson has ing all voters OUff err this (Appa 'turn price $1.oo the vacine S 'His