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Manchester, Georgia
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May 15, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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May 15, 2003
 

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C pinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - MAY 15, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O4O A (rimr IJuhlimtion Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE PUBI JStIER]AI)VERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKENDALL A&SOCIATE PUBIJStIER/EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON B USINVLS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. l)x 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 My Friend... Thank you, my readers! Last week, I wrote about how sometimes it's very hard to find a topic to write about each week and do so not know- ing if this column is read or not. Well, I got my answer. I couldn't count the num- ber of people that either phoned, wrote me a note, or told me personally that they do read my column each week, and some even said they look forward to it. Admittedly, some of them told me they don't always agree with what I have to say or some of my topics, but they do read it each week and actu- ally enjoy it. For that, I thank each and every one of you. I appreciate your doing so and hope you will continue. Having said that, let's move on to this week's col- umn. This week I want to talk about friendship. Usually a dog is referred to as "Man's Best Friend," but I think cats should be includ- ed in that statement as well. For that matter, any pet. Pets are wonderful things. They keep you com- pany. They are loyal. They are forgiving and above all, they always love you. I can't stand it when someone uses the old cliche, "It's just a dumb ani- mal." Animals are not dumb by any stretch of the imagina- 'lion. They are very intelligent as a matter of fact. Case in point, my pet Cocker Spaniel, Hershey. Hershey got his name because he is chocolate in color and his nose looks like a little Hershey's Kiss. While he could be called a lot of things, dumb is not one of them. I set the ground rules and he obeys. He responds to many voice commands and knows what they mean. He recognizes the word "NO" very well. He's learn "Stay," "Sit," and other commands. The little mongrel has become a dear friend and I'm really crazy about him. While it breaks my heart, Hershey and I will soon part company. YOU SEE, having a pet requires much from the owner. You need to spend time with them, play with them, take care of them and above all.., train them. Hershey has to spend a great deal of time alone, and that's not good for him. Every pet needs time with it's owner. While I love Hershey, I've reached the conclusion a home with kids or a senior cit- izen that can spend lots of time with him would be bet- ter for him. Hershey is AKC regis- tered, had all his shots and sports a fancy Cocker Cut which he receives at PetSmart. There's no other way to describe him than "Cute as a button." I have become very attached to Hershey and he has with me as well. I can't walk around the house with- out him under foot. If I go out- side, Hershey follows. Last week, I was painting the porch and he couldn't resist having to stay right with me and of course, the white paint used to paint my porch rails is now in his beau- tiful brown coat. Hershey is no doubt a dear friend and I will miss him when he leaves. I'M SAYING ALL of this for a reason. Having owned pets most of my life, I've learned something about them. Every pet I've ever owned has many human char- acteristics. For instance, each one of them had a distinct per- sonality, they are smart enough to adapt to any situa- tion, and they were always a good friend. In our lifetime, we can own several pets and have many friends, but occasion- ally, there is one friend that stands out above the rest and you just know that you'll always be friends. But we allow life, for whatever rea- son, to put distance in our friendship. We think of them occasionally, drop them line, and sometimes even call. But, the friendship that once was becomes memories. The reason for this col- umn is really simple. I was speaking with a man recent- ly that had lost a dear friend. His friend died of a heart attack. The man was kind of upset with himself because he had not spent time with his friend in recent years and now regretted it. "There's a funny thing about friendship," I told him. "While life and miles can put distance between us, it can never take away the bond between us." When it comes to friend- ship, Aristotle said it best... "What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies." In other words, friends are as one and should treat each other as such. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 R(xmvelt Highway. Manchester. Georgia 31816. t TSPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Tmup. Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Peric, dical postage paid at Hogansvillc. Georgia 30230. FOR SUBSCRIP'rIONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POWMAKI'ER" Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansx ille, GA 30230. STAFF |hiblisher and Advertising Director. .............................................................. Mike Hale Ass(x:iatc Publisher and Fxtitor ............................................................ Jobn Kuykeodall Business Manager. ................................................................................ Jayne Golds,on Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson Stall'Writer .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advctlising Managm: ................................................................. Lanrie Lewis Cnmlx)sing .................................................................. Valiuda Ivery, Dcwayne Flowers Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Golds,on Circulation M;magcr. .................................................................................... Judy Crews Prtxtuction Manager. ........................................................................... Bobby Brazil Jr Assistant Manager. .......................................................................... Wa>ne Grochowski Pressnx)m ........................................... Damcll McCauley. Joey Knight, Lany Colleges CORPORATE OFFICEI, U4 Presidcnt ............................................................................................. Milhwd B. Grimes Vice rsideut .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary...: .................................... Lmra Grimes Corer Tretturer._._.: ............................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant SecretaD'. .............................................. James S. Grimes A Kid Takes a Diesel Engine Written in 1979 He climbed up the side of Miner's Crossing, ABOARD THE SOUTH- ERN CRESCENT -- This weirdo little kid I know who loves passenger trains and wouldn't give you a dime for what the Wright Brothers thought was such a big deal got to ride in the head engine of the Southern Crescent this week. North to Greenville, South Carolina, in the evening, and south back to Atlanta early the next morn- ing. It was the kid's last oppor- tunity to experience such an adventure. Wednesday night, Southern Railway got out of the passenger train business, 149 years after it began, when the last Southern Crescent pulled out of Atlanta's Peachtree Station bound for Washington, D.C. As of Thursday, Amtrak controls Atlanta's only pas- senger train. It is now called simply, "The Crescent," and even its future may be limit- ed. THIS KID should have his head examined. Once he paid $50 for a conductor's hat. He wears it when he listens to his record of train sounds. He has pictures of trains on his walls and once he even spent a honeymoon night on a train. He's a mature kid. the green and gold Southern engine number 6914 shortly before 7:30 p.m. at Peachtree Station, and he heard the con- ductor from the back of the train, "lYain number Two, the blue flag is down! Let's leave here!" He got to sit next to the engineer and watch him pull back the throttle and turn on the air brakes and blow the whistle of the ancient, snort- ing diesel when school buses approached crossings. There are 52 crossings between Atlanta and the train's first stop, Galnesville. The whistle must be blown before reaching each one. "I love my job," said the engineer, "But people at crossings will drive you crazy. I fear school buses and tank trucks in that order." The engineer's name was M.D. Hester, a man steady- handed, clear-eyed and steel- jawed. He wore a green base- ball cap and said he has been at his job for 39 years, the last six of which have been spent driving the Southern Crescent between Atlanta and Greenville. He will continue to drive the train for Amtrak "until I get disgusted." You know how working for the government can be. A passenger train engi- neer stays busy. He reads sig- nals that tell him which track to take because there is a freight train on the other one. He reads orders to tell him how fast to run the train. His maximum speed on curves in 60 miles per hour. His maximum speed on straight track in 79. The person driving the train is often in danger. "We're sitting ducks up here," he explained. "People throw things off overpasses and hang things from a rope off an overpass." "One morning I was com- ing in and a man appeared at the side of the train. He wore a hat he had made out of hon- eysuckles, a pair of clodhop- pers and nothing else. He ran along the side of the train, flapping his arms trying to fly." Probably somebody late for work at the state capitol. We were 34 minutes behind schedule leaving Atlanta for Greenville. You cross Piedmont Road, then Interstate 285, on and on out through Duluth and Buford and Flowery Branch. We whisked past Bill the last person to Southern Railway train. That was 1907. $18.000 in gold but tured a few days later,; out drunk in a hotel room. The sun rises southbound Crescent. Greeting in the engine of a trainwith behind you makin of the devils of 10 is something Freud have experienced preted. The little kid loved minute of it. His still wide and his pounding neer had allowed as the train station. He let the little the whistle, on the Crescent. And his complete. BY SPECIAL NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATI . GdPxIZZARD, WHO GREW UPII BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ BOOKS PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOIg ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES: WIDE. Know the Faithfulness of God There are times when we all go through the difficult times of life. Those times may be times of sickness, death, family problems, financial reverses, or the everyday temptations of life. Someone has  t6stment, "You are either in a storm, coming out of a storm, or headed to a storm." It is during these difficult days of life that one of the many tactics of Satan come to bear on our lives, and that is his weapon of accusa- tion. The devil by name means an accuser. From a careful study of the Bible, one can find that Satan has four tar- gets for his accusations. He will accuse man to God, man to man, man to himself, and he will also accuse God to man. It is during the trials of life that one will find Satan accusing God to man. While in those difficult days, the enemy of souls will tryto cast a dark shadow on the grace and mercy of God Almighty. He will bring things to our minds like, "If God really loved you, then why did he let your father die?" Or he might say, "If God is so great, then why didn't he stop your child from having tlmMrreck?" One of the goals of Satan is to hinder and even try to stop people from placing their faith in the living God of glory. (2 Corinthians 4:4) But, John eight tells us that Satan is a liar and the father of lies. Dear child of God, when the dark days of life come, rest assured that God is faithful. THERE has not been one promise of God that has "fell to the ground." However, because we are still living in this robe of flesh, we often struggle in our faith in God's control of things. Many times we are like Job who said in Job chapter twenty three and verse three, i: :::i::!iii i :.::i :. ii :: if: i:. i ::i !ii!ii::ji!il "Oh that I knew where I might find him! That I might come even to his seat." He also said in that same chapter begin- ning in verse eight, "Behold, I go forward, but he is not there; and backward, but I cannot perceive him. On the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him: he hideth himself on the right hand, that I cannot see him: But he knoweth the way that I take when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold." Many times in the tri- als we wonder where God is and if he has indeed left us. Look back to what Job said in verse nine, "On the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold that even thou see GOd working, he working. ALL THROUGB ture, we can see the benefit oP hm There may be when the people not see God work lives, but we can dence in knowing Hebrews 13:2 Bible said I will never leave forsake thee." may not perceive times, he is always and for those who and are the called to his purpose, he is all things for our goo# glory. (Romans 8:28) May we always ber that while life, be true to leave or forsake In the Hogansville Predecessor toth NEW INDUSTRY? "Any town! really makes up its mind to have al growth can have it," Hearn chairman of the Comm Division of the Georgia Power told Kiwanis and their guests at the lar monthly meeting here Tuesday. BIG CITY LIFE: The Hogansville has installed new meters for the shoppers. 'hey are in perfect order," Chief Russell Smith said be kept that way." Any person pering with the meters" a case made against him. NUCLEAR AGE: Colonel Solon Moncrief Jr., son of Mr. Solon Moncrief of Sylvania, Gs. nephew of Misses Wilbur and Moncrief of our city, took Maneuvers recently conducted at  Desert Rock, Nev. BARGAINS: At the end Hogansville residents Herald's ads would find was touting the "new and im Imperial TV for an intimidating Meanwhile, Colonial had two paper for $.23, a pound of and whole hams for $.67 per pound. had men's suits for $17.88 and dresses for $2.77. Housing was too: a want ad listed a six-room rent at $40 per month. the only thing that would end u would be the television.)