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May 17, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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May 17, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - ] 17 2001 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs e2o.o4o A GmeJ Ib PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRXTrOR JOHN KUYKENDALL Kssoc PtmusJDrro BRYAN Gm'ER ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAVNE N BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-220 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia S0230 Speaking Out on " Big Issues Maybe the FBI Needs to Take Do you find it ironic that the system Timothy McVeigh is so much agaiast is the same system that is now protecting him? McVeigh, who was supposed to die for the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma, has been granted a stay of execution for 30 days. That stay was granted because the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) apparently withheld certain information from his defense attorneys. Ironically, no one believes that McVeigh is innocent and they certainly don't believe it will change his death sentence. After all, McVeigh ha.s admit- ted to killing the 168 people and injuring countless others in the bombing in a book and during an interview on national television. I for one do not believe there :believes for one minute that McVeigh is innocent. This leaves me wondering if is c0mpetent of handling investigations of  magnitude. The bureau's track record that good, if you ask me. Just think back to the O.J. mon investigation and the incident in Waco, Texas. Those two cases alone are to make me wonder how  many innocent people have died or been arrested and imprisoned by the bureau that were innocent and how many were released because of the bureau's mistakes were guilty. I'm sure glad that we havethe Georgia Bureau of Investigations here to help look after us. Their track record is pretty Maybe they would be willing to teach the FBI how to collect and handle evidence without it being contaminated, how to be sure that records are kept accu- rately and above all, is given to the right people. State's Unemployment  on the rise_ The number of unemploy- ment claims in the state rose by 103 percent over last year at this time in April, according to fig- ares released by the Georgia Department of Labor last week While that doesn't look good, this looks even worse. During the first three months i of this year, the claims have risen by 67 percent over last year's fig- tires. for Georgia, as a barometer for how the economy is doing. The figures indicate that Georgia's economy continues to be slowing down. The true indicator is the num- ber of Georgians filing unem- ployment claims for the first time. That figure rose from 22,956 last year during April to 46,686 this year. According to State Labor Commissioner Michael Thurmond, the new layoffs are spreading across the economy in several job sectors, such as tech- nology, manufacturing and retail. Thurmond also said some of the people who have lost their jobs are turning the adversity around by taking the time to be trained for a new profession to make them more employable. Maybe they are being trained as lumberjacks, because when the layoffs are in technology, manufacturing and retail, that doesn't leave much they can be trained for. *Juveniles Should Have Same Rights... During a press conference on the steps of the state capitol on Friday, May 11, the Georgia Alliance for Children and ACLU presented a demand letter call- ing for Gov. Roy Barnes, Chief Justice Robert Benham and other Georgia officials to enforce state law that provides for bail for juve- niles accused of committing crimes. According to Georgia's Department of Juvenile Justice, 96% of the children routinely incarcerated in juvenile deten- tion centers are digible for bail, yet few are offered this option. State coe states that all juve- niles, on aplication of the par- ent or guardi!m, shall have the same right to as adults. The group lOinted out that recently a 13-year-old boy was held for 43 days without a court hearing after he was arrested on a charge of shoplifting some candy bars. Adults are not held like that without bail being set, children should not be either. The courts should consider this and give juveniles the same rights as adults and offer them bail. After all, the last time I checked we still live in a country that believes you are innocent until proven guilty. Tm HOGASVt Ho NEWS is published vv.kly by the St-Metcury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publicatitms. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscriplkm tares by maih $16 in loup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid m Hogansville. C_ 30230. FoR  call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publicatis, P. O. Box 426. , C.x,gia 31816. : Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. S'rm Publisher and Advertksin Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Aesociate Publisher and Editor ............................................................... John Kuykendall Axci Editc ................................................................................................. aryan Geter Assistam Ftor ......................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ...................................................................................... Jayne Goldston  Writexs ..................................................................... . C. Snider. Billy Brymlt A.mt Ad Mager ............................................................. Laurie Lewis Adg Sales. ......................................................................................  Lester A Editor ................................................................................ .....,...Rob Richardson Ckn ............................................... ...- Ivety, Deborah Smith. Laumn King Legals .............................................................................................. Jayae Goldston R and Clafieds ...................................................................... lem Young Pressroom Manager ......................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pmssrotmt ................................................................................................... David Boggs President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice Presidem ........................................................................................  S. Grimes Secretary .............................................................................................. Zaura Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Legal I and t Secretary .................................................... James S. Grimes Agony: Wearing Ties in There are limits and bound- aries for everything. To exclude individuals from a hotel or a restaurant because of color is to deny these individuals a place to sleep and eat, necessities of life, and would be downright cruel. And facilities funded by govern- ments should be open to all. On the other hand, if I owned a restaurant and I wanted to exclude people who aren't wear- ing shoes or shirts, that's my busi- ness, too. (I still like the sign I saw in a Longhorn Steak House in Atlanta -- (No Shoes, No Shirt, No Service. Panties Optional.) I don't wear ties. When I attempt to enter a restaurant, and I am told, "Gentlemen are required to wear ties," I don't scream about my rights. I do one of two things, depending on my mood or how much I want to eat in this particular restaurant. I either say, "Thank you, I'll go someplace else," or I say, "Do you have a tie I can wear?" I've never been in any tie- demanding restaurants that weren't happy to provide me one. I was in New York staying at The Donald's Plaza. I was having a business lunch, and when I approached the maitre d's stand at the restaurant, the gentleman standing there told me I could not get in without a tie. I was wear- ing a golf shirt and blue blazer. TO BE HONEST, I didnR like the maitre d's snippy little way of saying I needed a tie. I also did- n't like his looks. He appeared Ichabod Ch and peered down his lengthy snout at me when he informed me of the tie rule. But I figured Ichabod didn't make the rules, so I asked, "Do you have a tie I can wear?" "But of course," he replied, and brought me three from which to choose. All three were fashion nightmares, but I took one. I did make one further state- ment but just for the record: "What's really silly about this," I said, "is I'm about to put on an incredibly ugly and outdat- ed tie on a golf shirt. I simply want to point that out, to say just because a man is wearing a tie, it doesn't always improve his appearance." Then another problem arose. It had been so long since I had worn a tie, I couldn't remember how to tie the damn thing. I final- ly gave up and tied it in a hard knot -- and went in to lunch. People stared at me, and one of the people who stared at me was The Donald, who was having lunch at the very same restaurant I was. After lunch, the maitre d' had to fetch a pair of scissors and cut the tie off me, since there is no way to loosen a bowline half-hitch turnaround without an acetylene torch. But I don't own the Plaza, and I had to abide by its rules. It's like I told Maria Maples later over drinks in the Oak Room: "Look, if The Donald wants you to put on a chicken outfit and run around the room flapping your wings and cackling, that's just what makes the man's grapefruit squirt, and he's paying the bills." "I guess you're right," said Marla. "But I am going to draw the line at pretending like I'm lay- ing eggs." THERE'S NOTHING wrong with dr-inking beer. In fact, there are a lot of things right about drinking beer. In the first place, you have to drink a lot more beers than you have to drink Beefeater very dry martinis suddenly to run outside and howl at the moon. A lot of men prefer beer. I understand Paul Neanan is one. But you throw the word "swill- ing" with beer, and here comes that image again of Billy Carter throwing 'em down, and his belly getting bigger and bigger and his neck getting redder and redder with every swallow. As far as I know, most beer- swillers are college boys, and they swill just as often, I'm almost cer- tain, in the Big Ten as they do in the Southeastern Conference. College boys still many oats to feel and ging (swilling) is one manifested. But presidency, I sat in came in, however, he a single beer. He was some sort plastic cup. My best i have been Seven-up BY WITH mS WIDOW, G, WHO GREW NEARBY MORELAND, BECAME THE MOST GEORGIA WRITER OF GRIZZARD AMERICA] BELONGED TO THIS GEORGIA, OF WHICH SOOEN, OF 1-85 FROM HOGANSVIILE IS HONOR. THE LEWIS MUSEUM WAS MORELAND IN 1996, AND t ING AND EDITING LAB DEDICATED TO HIS HIS BELOVED SALE THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOg ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC NATIONWIDE. The Question: To Die or Not to Die The date was April 19, 1995, the time was 9:03 a.m., and the place was Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The day probably seemed to be just another day in the lives of hundreds ofci- eral employees when their lives were shattered with the great- est terrorist attack ever on US soil. The day was the day Timothy McVeigh killed 168 innocent men, women and chil- dren. In the light of recent events, that event has found a renewed place in the news media. Whether the FBI know- ingly and willingly withheld some 3,000 documents from the McVeigh defense lawyers, or it was an honest human mistake is a fact that only the living God of glory knows. Because of that withholding of information, rel- evant or not, Attorney General John Ashcroft made the deci- sion to postpone the highly pub- licized execution until June 11. In my opinion, the Attorney General made the proper deci- sion. But, the innocence or guilt of T4mothy McVeigh or the post- ponement decision is not the focus of today's article. Anytime an execution approaches, the debate over the death penalty seems to intensi fy; however, in the McVeigh case, I haven't really seen those who oppose the death penalty make much noise. My question today is, "Should those who commit capital offenses be sen- tenced to capital punishment?" I realize that is an ongoing debate generally between the liberal and the conservative sides of our country, and I doubt very seriously that in such an article as this I can settle such a debate. Just because the debate may be continuing in the courtroom, in the church, on the storefront porch, in the barber shop, or on Capitol Hill, the question is a settled question. I am not referring to my opinion, your opinion, or the church's opinion, I am referring to what the Bible has to say. You say, "Preacher, is it really that cut and dried of an issue?" According to the Word of God, it is. We read in Romans, chap- ter 13, that civil government is an institution of God himself. We are commanded to obey the laws of the land, pay our fair share of taxes, and Christians should be the best citizens that any government has ever seen. As we consider the thought of God and civil government, we cannot do so without consider- ing Genesis, chapter nine. In Genesis nine, the flood hasn't been long gone and Noah, his wife, and his family axe the only human beings alive. It is this context where we find human government. If one would carefully study Genesis nine, it is plain that the death penalty is a God ordained method for dealing with the cap- ital offender. In verses four through six we read, "But flesh with the life thereof, which is the blood thereof, shall ye not eat. And surely your blood of your lives will I require; at the hand of every beast will I require it, and at the hand of man; at the hand of every man's brother will I require the life of man. Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man." a gift of God, life is sacred and precious "death penalty is God's to those who take up selves the power to alone is the one who the authority and the give or take life, and tO1 who violates that says by man shall his taken. The death penalty either centers on his ness or its ability I guarantee you Timothy McVeigh is death, he'll not blow er building. If those mit capital crimes vinced their life required for those would not be so quick God and take life. I do not mean to cold, the Oklahoma was a tragedy involved,including the McVeigh family. Be may, we must the Bible for a life. Just ever, Christ died for est blooded of like he died for the of men. One Who Usually Achieves Continuously I'm in awe of those who seem to do everything perfectly - even as they age. Cola doesn hesitate to say that she is 84. She is attractive, intelligent, feisty, talkative and achieving. A retired teacher, she has also ownedandoperated dress and flo- ral shops in the past. Knowledgeable and perceptive, her daysarealways fulL Beautiful entertaining is a special talent - she'll be helping host a neighbor- hood party soon. Sometimes I ride along with her. She drives a Cadillac. (After buying it, she had a large carport with covered walkway to the house added, so keeps the car in pristine condition) She is always interested in maintaining a stylish wardrobe. This spring she bought a long denim dress and a couple of pret- ty denim tops, but needed a matching skirt. I found one she would like, so phoned and asked if she'd be at home the next after- noon for me to deliver when I went out. Mid-afternoon I checked and she said to come on. Besides the skirt I was taking an article I'd written, as secretary, about our Woman's Club activities that she wanted published. Also I took a section of the Columbus paper that listed the son of afriend, who draws one of the highest salaries of any State employee. She was pleased with the skirt, but would try it later. In her kitchen she had laid out a beau- tiful set of stainless flatware that she had ordered. She also showed me a wall arrangement of sever- al unique and colorful prints that she'd bought in Russia and had just gotten framed. Then she asked me to ride to the nursery in Jackson with her. Already her numerous large hanging ferns were in place. Many other plants and flowers had also been put out. A white clematis was blooming beautiful- ly. At the nursery Cola got a young helper and they filled three wagons with her selections. After I'd walked through and seen the array, I joined a little girl in a plat- form swing. The child was Olivia and we talked about school, her sisters, grandmothers, scooter, bike and pool. She described herself as warm natured and she didn like the shorts she was wearing because they were too short. I had to explain what I meant when I said I didn't have a green thumb. Finally she said she and her motlv er had been their eight hours - quite an exaggeration! We were the last to leave the nursery, after the 6:00 ing. We then met Cola's able open-air barbecue Back home, plants and she tried which only needed Shewas looking day when help and" ty on premises. play will brighten the summer. As I was leaving, sented me a much-a copy of "The Prayer We wekome your leta, rs. Please m.dl them t: The Hogansville Home News P. o. Box 426 H  3O23O 706-84G2206 Pe be u, to ,' an  andp/ne ,u,r