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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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May 18, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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May 18, 2000
 

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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - MAY 18, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A tSrs ub MIIlard B. Gdmes, PreValent MInE HAI PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING DIRECIDR JOHN KLryKENDAIL &SSOCtATE PUBLISHER/FrroR BRYAN GETER ASSCIATE EnrroR JAYNE GOSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Golf Community Will Still Happen As expected, the Hogansville City Council voted 4-1 Monday night to override Mayor Wilson St. Clair's veto of a watershed plan which calls for wider setbacks from creekbeds than the state's requirements. Supporters of the wider setbacks have still not pro- vided expert evidence in support of the wider setbacks, but appar- ently they are convinced that the city's water supply will be better protected by prohibiting devel- opment within 175 feet of the creeks that feed the reservoir. This is another obstacle to the proposed golf community, which is still planned on a large tract of land near the reservoir. Many res- idents -- and even officials - prob- ably feel today that there is little hope that the golf commtmity will ever become a reality. In fact, there is obviously a small but pow- erful contingent who hope that it will NOT be developed. Obviously a number of strong egos are involved, beth in the land ownership; the developers; and most assuredly on the Hogansvllle City C0tuiefl. As an example of the Council's arrogance, an offer by Troup EMC to become the city's dis- tributor of electricity, after pay- ing the city $3 million for its elec- trical lines, was not even dis- cussed in the open Council meet- ing Monday night. The public deserves to know more about that offer. As for the golf community development, it is still likely to happen within the coming year. A dispute involving the final price for the property is dose to being settled, according to confidential sources. Rezonlng for the project was actually approved last summer by the City Council, although a final detailed plan for the devel- opment must be drawn up and approved. That can happen as soon as the differences on the price of the property are resolved. Although the wider setbacks along the creekbanks will limit the development to only one golf course, and will require higher costs in constructing the course, those are problems that can be overcome. The golf community will hap- pen if a spirit of cooperation replaces the negative attitude that pervades the city's small but potent power structure. We hope that property own- ers will accept the Council's deci- sion on the watershed plan and not bring any legal actions that would further delay the golf com- munity or cost the city time and money to defend. The development isa CAN DO project. But a lot of money is involved, both in buying the land, building the golf course, and then building the houses and condos, which are expected to range in sales price from $150,000 to $800,000. The eventual benefits to Hogansville and Troup County can be enormous -- for all resi- dents. But the developers are the ones putting their money into a risky venture. They deserve a welcome mat from the city, not a slammed door. Time Special for Graduates As the air conditioners crank up, the vegetable plants began to sprout in the gardens, the small children become restless in the classrooms and the older ones get rowdy, you can tell that school will soon be out and summer is just around the corner. In the elementary schools, the children look forward to the "field day" activities as they compete for the ribbons. RECENTLY, a little boy in my church was planning it out. He said he knew he could out- run "Joe" and "John" but he could- n't beat "Mike." The next Sunday he told me he came in first place in the race. The kids take these games seriously. Many grammar schoolers look forward to Vacation Bible School in their respective church- es, while others plan to take a trip to visit grandma and grandpa. THE MIDDLE SCHOOL stu- dent look forward to their first "summer job." Since they aren't old enough to be employed by McDonald's or KFC, they will cut grass or baby sit. Others look forward to the couch and the remote. THEHIGH SCHOOLERS will work in the fast food restaurants or the grocery stores so they can buy gas for their car and clothes for the summer. The graduate has now come to the point he has been looking forward to for the past12 or 13 years. He now has decisions to make as he approaches the crossroad in life. Will he chose to futher his edu- cation by going to college or to a vocational school? Will be enter the work-force "The graduate has now come to the point he has been looking for- ward to for the past 12 or 13 years..." or go into the armed services? Or will he get married and 'settle down?' GRADUATE, you will forget your graduation. Whether it is in um or on the football day will fprever be in EVEN THOUGH it 28 years since I forever remember that night. We had to off the football field the l before and set chairs the long march to get mY{ ma was well worth it all. WHATaschool, has been! It seems as ff but yesterday. Time l were some the Before you September will be cycle starts over. FDR Gets His Swimmin' Pool (Another in a series) "Thanks Everybody; FDR Gets His Swimmin' Pool" was the Daily News headline March 25. "The News today closed its con- tribution list." The grand total was $21,829.69, counting services that would not directly underwrite the pool itself. The cash total was just over $12,000 and the News esti- mated that donations in the mail plus proceeds from the benefit would more than cover the $13,000 check it was preparing to write for the federal construction team headed by Lieutenant Colonel U.S. Grant III. The show netted some $8,000. Tickets cost $1.10 to $3.30, for which the swimming pool subsi- dizers got quite a treat; James Melton, Irving Berlin, Clayton, Jackson and Durante, Bea Lillie, Alfred Lund and Lynn Fontane, Noel Coward, Frances Lederer and Dorothy Gish, Fred Astaire, Eddie Duchin, Gilda Gray, Stoopnagle and Budd, Lupe Velez, Edward G. Robinson, Bette Davis, Joan Blondell, Lilly Damita, Tallulah Bankhead, Vincent Lopez, Pat Rooney St. and Jr., Eugenic Leontovich, Ethel Merman, Jack Dempsey, the Street Singer, Fanny Brice, Jack Benny, Tediwis, Bert Lahr, Borrah Minnevich, Little Jack Little and at least a dozen more well known show-business personalities. The event was the prototype of later fund raising by show-business stars for political parties and candidates. John Roosevelt attended in person. The President listened to a special radio broadcast over New York station WMCA. He wired the theater, "Broadcast splendid. I enjoyed it." COLONEL GRANT mean- while began planning. He thought at first Roosevelt wanted a small exercise pool and requested blue- prints of pools and work tables from Warm Springs. Roosevelt said he wanted a pool to swim in. Given the choice of indoors or out, he chose in. His first problem was the cost. It appeared when bids were sought that Grant would have only about $20,000 in cash. Even though the federal government was going to do the demolition and earthwork to create a basement under the White House for the pool, the three construction companies bid $23,477, $25,700 and $26,728, a goodbit more that the $15,000orig- inal estimate. The pool was not a large one -- 15X51 feet, with a maximum depth of seven and a half feet. But the pool room and dressing rooms, with elaborate tile work, added greatly to the cost.' The first low bidder reworked its proposal to get it down to $19,995.15. Roosevelt followed the plan- "Swimming is the only exercise I can get," Roosevelt says. ning closely, once arguing with Grant in favor of cheap plaster rather than tile. Condensation problems required a compromise -- glazed terra-cotta in some places, crab-orchard stone else- where. The final cost of thepool was $22,316.64. ON JUNE 3, the News proud- ly ran a picture of the pool on its front page. "You gave this to the President," a line said. A story quoted Roosevelt: "I just want to say a personal word of thanks to (workmen) top to bottom. I admire the fine spirit that all displayed in building this fine pool. The pool is of inestimable benefit and swim- ming in it is the only exercise I can get." The next day, a and Eleanor took their first the pool. Thereafter, when he was in residence J White House. That, exercises, and Commander George Fox, officer attached to the House as aide to the became a major Roosevelt inhis HIS TRIPS to Warm averaged barely did not get into the tute on by the way, did not come White House to be masseur. He had to Calvin Coolidge Hoover. (Next week: The deception.) rHE SQUmE OF WARM AT THE GIFT SHOP LITrL[ TAINS ALL OF THE PER DURING THE PAST PROCEEDS PROM' SALE ALL GO TO TI SEVELT CENTER. Graduates Have Three C Tm HOC, ASVn HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $16inTroop, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhevv. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class posta& paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR  call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Managvr, Star Mcwa'y Publications, E O. Box 426, Mandster, Georgia 31816. POgrMAST: Send addvss clmngcs to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STArt Publisher and Advertising  .................................................................. .Mike Associate Publisher and EdiCt ................................................................ John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Ctc Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ......................... Zoccah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising  ....................................................................... e s Advertising Sales ............................................................................................. J.Jnda I.ta" Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snide= Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, Lam King Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda IvcTy Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manage" ......................................................................................... Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COmPOP.ATE Oenoz President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Gtin Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Gtin Secretory ................................................................................................ Lama Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Grim It's almost graduation time at our local high schools. Soon, those who have endured the 12 long years of hard work receiving their education will walk the isle and receive their diplomas. I would like to congratulate our graduates on their success. Each graduate has shown deter- mination and dedication. The diploma they will receive means much more than they will ever know. THE GRADUATES must now make a decision about their future. Unfortunately, there are only three choices available to them. The first choice is to further their education. College may be right for some, while others may choose to attend technical school. Those who choose to continue their education will enhance their income down the road. Most col- lege graduates will find a start- ing position with salaries ranging from about $20,000 to $35,000 annually. If they seek to contin- ue their education past four years of college, that salary could increase by as much as 20 per- cent. So, attending college or tech- nical school after graduation will certainly pay dividends in the future. The second choice available to our graduates is to join the working force. Of course, most graduates will find salaries rang- ing from $6 to $8 dollars an hour for an entry level person. Of course, if they remain with the "Most college graduates will find a starting position with salaries ranging from about $20,000to$35,000 annually." they will probably be making more in four years and the salary could range from $18,500 to about $22,000 per year. The third choice is to join the armed forces. The salary isn't great, but the benefits are good and a recruit earns income toward college while serving. It is an excellent way to pay for a college education. MAKING THIS DECISION will not be easy. I hope that each of them make the Whatever the graduate I wish them success m I lowing tips to make their' more successful. S is for sacrifice. life worth having ing a sacrifice for. Uis successful you must face what the outcome will be. C is for Christ. remember that when you is there to pick you C Is for must be committed to dreams and goals. because the road gets tO travel. E is for effort. In you do, always give you S is for special. Always thing you do, try to do expected. S is for sensitive. always be susceptible ideas, the feelings of around your al life. Simply put, ers and they With these things, success in the life. graduates and I you