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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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May 24, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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May 24, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE Holm NEWS - L, 2001 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usps 62o-04o A Gmne batn Mn H/J PUBLISttER/ADVERTISING DIRTOR JOHN Kta'VOAIJ. /kSSOCZA PtmUSv_MEDrroR BRYAN GETER ASSOOA EDITOR JAVNE BUSINESS IVIANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 12. O. Box 426 Hognsville, Georgia 30230 Cool But Save Energy Costs Is it summer or what? The local area saw temperatures in the 90s the last few days. Last temperature of 92 degrees set a record for this time of year. Temperatures on Friday Saturday were about the With both temperatures and energy rates on the rise, con- sumers will soon see the effects of those warm days on their monthly bills. Since warm weath- er is already upon us, now would be a good time to give your home an "Energy Checkup." Here are a few tips that will help you save a little money on your energy bills during the hot weather: 1) Don't use the dryer during hot weather. Every cubic foot of hot air the dryer produces, is another cubic foot of hot air you air conditioner has to cool down. It would be best tOrah your dryer late at night or early in the morn- ingto help keep energy bins down some. Of course, the best way to save is to put a clothesline up in back yard. 2), Hav,mr+dUct system leaks..While most of us windows and doors as the major way a home loses cool or warm air it is actually leaks in the home's duet system that loses most of that air. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), gaps, joints and disconnections in the home's duet system lose between 25% and 40% of the ener- gy produced by a heating or cool- ing system. Authorities recom- !:mend having a contractor seal them with a brushed on "mastic". While duct tape is great for many sealing ducts is not one of 3) Ask your air conditioning contractor to perform an Infiltrometer "blower door" test. The blower door is a computer- ized instrument originally invent- ed by the Ipartment of Energy. It pinpoints where your home's are, such as duct leaks, and also measures how leaky the overall house is. While most homes are still far too leaky, some are now quite tight, and mechanical ventilation to ensure the air inside is fresh. Many contractors offer an Infiltrometer test as part of a "Whole House Comfort Checkup" that also checks insulation levels and overall duct performance. For more information, visit the website at www.comfortinsti- tute.org. 4) Replace your air condi- tioner or heat pump filters. Most systems need this done every month to ensure safe and effi- cient operation. Some, such as electric air cleaners, need to be thoroughly washed. $) Have your air conditioner cleaned and tuned. A pre-season tune-up is a great investment. It not only reduces the chances of breakdowns during t,hoee hot days, but also helps the s run more efficiently and Cuts energy costs. You may want to make sure the contractor cleans both the inside and outside trans- fer coils and checks refrigerant gas charge by measuring "super- heat" or "subcooling." For a free report on "How to Identify a Good Heating and Cooling Contractor," visit the website listed above. 6) Consider replacing your old air conditioner or heat pump. Just like a ear, central cooling equip- ment doesn last forever. If your system is over 12 years old, and you are planning to stay in your home more than a few years, many authorities recommend replacing the cooling system before it fails permanently. A new system win not only improve your comfort, but is more dependable, creates less air pollution and usu- ally pays for itself in energy sav- ings. Most new systems are twice as energy eficient as only sys- tems. Be surto choose one that has an EPAk "Etl" ergy Star', label \\; FOR MORE iformation, go to www.comfortitute.org. The Comfort Institute con- tributed to this column. welcome your letters. Ps m.,l them w: The Hogansville Home News P. O. Box 4_26 Hoe Georgia 30230 Please fax daem m: 7002206 Please be sure to indude an address and phone number Or verification). , i TuE Hoc  NEws is lmblished weekly by the Slm-Mmy Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, ia 31816. USPS 620.040. on rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heardor Meriw Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansvil,  30230: FOR call (706) 846-3188 or wrke to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 4 ter, Georgia 31816. PoS1.nsc Send addiess changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. t STAFF Publisher and Adsing Director ................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................ ........................................ John Kuykondall ' Associ Ftor .................................................................................................. Bry Gin, Ass Edi ........................................................................................... Rob Rkhatdson Business Manage ....................................................................................... Jayne C_ Staff" Writers ................. , .................................................... Michael C. Snide$. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ..................................................... : ................. .Laurie Advertising Sales ............................................................................................. Linda Lester Asist Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Composing ..................................................... Valinda ivery, Deborah Smith, Lamon King Leals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Cmidslon Receptionist and Class .............................................................................. Cteta Young Pressroom Manager ............... .,..: ........................................................... Wayne Grochowski ............................ . ............................................................................. David Boggs President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotl S. Grimes ............................................................................................... J.am C, an Coeer ............................................................................................. JOthy  Gaatt Co,reel  t Secretary .................................................... Jaraes S. Caim + AWANA Program a Wonderful Not long after I moved here in the summer of 1998, several people in the church with a bur- den to reach children and young people approached me about the AWANA program. The letters A.W.A.N.A. stand for Approved Workmen Are Not Ashamed, and it is a system whereby children and young people are taught bibli- cal principles through the mem- orization of scripture. After much prayer, the church unanimously decided to start the program at Antioch. In January of 1999, the AWANA program began at Antioch. The AWANA program is unique because it runs concur- rently with the school year, and just last night, we closed out our second full year to go along with the beginning first half year. The AWANA program is a wonderful tool to reach children and young people with the gospel and instill in them the biblical principles this world today is so seriously lacking. Each club night, which we meet on Wednesdays, consists of three parts: handbook time, counsel time and game time. Each aspect of club time is important to achieve a balanced level of instruction for those participating. FOR EACH director and leader in the clubs, there is much work before, during, and after club time. The AWANA club is not something that can be entered into with a ho-hum attitude. Not only does it take work from those directly involved in the clubs, but with- out the support of the church at large, the AWANA club could not be successful. After looking back over this club year, my heart is over- whelmed at the effort exerted, the prayers prayed, and the finances supplied that we may do a small part to try and make a difference in the lives of young people. I want to take these few lines and thank those who had a part in our AWANA program this year. For without the participa- tion of each one, the fifteen that professed Christ as their Savior may not have had an opportu- nity to receive God's free gift of salvation. The first group I would like to mention are the directors, leaders and general helpers who worked directly with the boys and girls. FROM THE directors who ran the clubs and shared the gospel message, to the leaders who kept records and listened to sections, to those who helped fill in and keep the peace when children would be children, thank you for your faithfulness and dedication to reach young people with the gospel. The second group I would "I am thrilled to see how the church stands behind those who are trying to reach boys and girls for Jesus." like to recognize is the church in general. Without the support of the whole church, the direc- tors and leaders could not do their job. There are two major lines of support, without which, the AWANA program could not The first, of course, is prayer support. Unless a work for God is bathed in prayer, it will amount to nothing. Each Wednesday night the folks in the prayer meeting began around the altar praying for the special requests that had been mentioned and I honestly cannot think of a time AWANA program was aloud in prayer. The AWANA be an expensive because those who the verses and do books receive nice It if was not for the cial support of the AWANA program exist. As a pastor, I am to see how the church behind those who are reach boys and girls fori Finally, let me to those parents wto their children and allow us here at AntiochJ time with them. Many times as I watc cars, vans and trucks and drop children and people off, nay heart whelmed at the res that God has given us. the parents allowing short time, Antioch could not exist. IN CLOSING, all tioned before thanks, but none so much! Savior Jesus Christ. sacrifice on would have no good bring, no reason to verses, and no hope to lost and dying world. May we never forget ! claim with the hymn God be the glory for things He hath done." Help Me Solve 'Pssst' Creature I don't have a clue what it was. All I know is he, she, or it just "Pssst, Pssst, Pssst," I wanted to scream. Try as I might, I am not a morn- ing person. By that, I mean I do not hit the floor pretending for one moment to be a Mary Sunshine of the morning. And hit- ting it at all before there is actu- ally a little sunshine showing is not my cup of tea no matter how strong its been brewed. At any rate, on a recent Saturday morning, I awoke at 5:30 and my body said get up. Most unusual. My body never says get up at 5:30 am. I am a 7 a.m. soul and not ashamed of it in light of the fact that I often work until well past midnight. Yet on this particular morn- ing, and a Saturday at that, when I could easily have snuggled until 8 or 8:30, I awoke and it was 5:30. It was one of those awakenings that told me there was no use to turn over and try to return to the dreamland from which I just been abruptly pulled. Reluctantly, but decidedly, I got up. Pulled on a robe. Took my thyroid pill. Poured a glass of tea - I prefer iced, 24/7 - and headed for the front porch to wait for the sun to come up. I was delighted by the hush that reigned. Most unlike the late evening when I sit out and listen to  soUndS of  nighL I real- ly do not like all that nighttime chatter which some claim is like a lullaby. But the early morning quiet was awesome. Then suddenly I heard that first "Pssst" Like when someone tries to get your attention in a hushed setting by saying, "Pssst, guess what" Same "Pssst." WELL, I ignored the first few sets of '1>sssts. " They seemed to come in sets of three. By early dawn I was really put out. The "Pssst" was no prelude to any- thing. No secret had been forth- coming. No urgent news had been whispered in my direction. The incessant "Psssts" were nothing but an interruption to the glori- ous silence that had greeted me when I first walked out onto the porch. Then suddenly, full dawn was upon me and the symphony began. Almost in unison the music filled the air. Mating doves seemed to have led, but I could not be sure because it was like all the sounds of the morning were competing to see who could sing the praises of this new day first. And the 'Psssf' was gone. I don't know that I have ever been more curious about the ori- gin of a sound. When Daniel got up and joined me on the porch, I asked him about the Pssst sound. He didn't know but that doesn't mean he doesn't really know. Its just that we are such opposites, the way I describe something is seldom the way he perceives it. Plus, he's deaf in one ear so he may never have heard my 'Pssst" sound before. At least not like I had heard it. SO, this is where you come in. If you have any idea what the creature is, v, Tite to me at PO Box 246, Gay, GA 30218. I have to know. I mean, what a job! What an awesome bility to be the one to "Pssst" as if to sm it comes!" every the glorious music of the unites all of nature in yeti er harmonious celebratioW more new day. One beginning. I figure the little ture that was irritatin end must have just get ready. It probably early every morning tion, and with such for the miracle of a new it just cant help who will listen "Pssst, here it comes again!" It is an awesome able to recognize the a new beginning. The knows its coming contain forgiving the next time 'Pssst" creature invades predawn silence. With your help I have a name for it when I whisper a silent to the Father of all new nings and acknowled anonymous creature of t he ing the absolute panies one more chance t again to get right it right. Value Conservat+ives, If You I have always admired Paul Harvey since he first began wit- ing his newspaper columns years ago. I enjoy hearing his radio broadcast today. The reasons I admire the man is he would write what he thought, he did not mind taking a contro- versial stand when he believed he was right, and he was and still is a conservative. Webster describes a conserv- ative as a person "favoring tradi- tional views and values; tending to oppose change; traditional in style; moderate; cautious." I think this pretty well fits Paul Harvey, and yes, it fits Bob Tribble as well. I most definitely favor tradition- al views and values, I tend to oppose changes until someone proves to me there is a better way, and I am a cautious person. .PAUL HARVEY gave us some- thing to think about recently when he penned the following: "We tried so hard to make things better for our kids that we made them worse. For my grandchildren, I'd like bet- ter. Fd really like for them to know about hand-me-down clothes and homemade ice cream and leftover meat sandwiches. "I hope they learn humility by and honesty by being cheated. "I hope they learntomake their own bed mad mow the lawn and wash the car. "I hope they have to share a bedroom with a younger sibling. It's all right if they have to draw a line down the middle of tl room, but when he wants to crawl under the covers because he is'sed, I hope they let him. "On rainy days when they have to catch a ride, I hope they don't ask to be dropped off two blocks away so they won't be seen riding with someone as uncool as their mom. "When they learn to use com- puters, I hope they also learn to add and subtract in their head. "And if a friend offers them dope or a joint, I hope they real- ize he's not their friend. "I sure hope they make time to sit on a porch with their grand- pa and go fishing with their uncle. 'hese things I wish for them - tough times and disappointments, hard work and happiness. To me it's the only way to appreciate life." THOUGHT provoking words from a conservative Paul Harvey, aman who favors traditional views and values, tends tooppose change just for the sake of change, and "I tend to oppose changes until proves to me there is a better way, and I am a cautio00 persor00 " who is a cautious man. My guess is that traditional views and values played a large part in the lives of the following two men as they faced tough times and disappointments . before becoming successful. He grew up in a shack in Munford, Texas,! of 150 people. He shared the had no toilet, ers and his mother. cleared spot on the floor. His prowess in enabled him to get out of 1 and attend Texas A&I. in himself enabled le John Randle to si lion deal with the Vikings. His father died 15, leaving him sole his family. By the time he he owned a store. was president of the Then bank failed and his ed a museum with ing animals and stranger! people. People flocked the world to place and it became tion for his later wealth and Bailey Circus. Failures, but not than likely the were raised by and values, please.