"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
May 25, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
May 25, 2000
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A Grnes lbliathm Millsrd B. Gdme=, PrNIclent MIKE HAIZ PUB LISHI'R/ADVERTISING DntECR JOHN KAI ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR BRYAN GETER ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSmF_,SS MANAGE Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230 Chocolate (?+ hs/s Looming Aht aa? Oh, N-O-O-O-OI A fungi is threatening the world's supply of cocoa beans. You know what that means, less chocolate! If the fungi threatening the crop is not stopped there could be a serious chocolate shortage by the year 2003, according to Hank Beeker, a spokesman for the U.S. government's Agricultural Research Center. However, help is on the way. The researchers have developed a good fungi that has helped reduce the spread of the bad fungi. Unfortunately, the bad fungi produces faster than the good guys. Isn't that always the way? BRAZIL, where most of our chocolate comes from, has been one of the hardest hit producing areas. In 1985, the United States purchased 430,000 tons of the beans used to produce chocolate. Last year, the fungi cut the yield to 130,000 tons. The latest har- vest was only 80,000 tons, the worst in 30 years. ..... The chocolate producers turned to West Africa when they learned of South America's prob- lems. However, it is feared that political unrest, drought and new infections could assault the African crops. THIS IS a chocolate lover's night mare. Imagining the world without chocolate is an impossi- ble task. Chocolate is another one of those things we all take for granted. After all, it's been around since the 1500's. We not only take it for granted, we're almost addicted to it. Anyway, if this trend contin- ues the price of chocolate will sky rocket. Not only will high prices be a problem, according to the "This is a chocolate lover's night mare. Imagining the world without chocolate is an impossible task." experts, it will be extremely scarce. HOWEVER, as Americans we can take some satisfaction in knowing that we rank low, when compared to most nations, in chocolate sales. In Switzerland, the average person consumes about 22.4 pounds of chocolate per year. In the U.S., the average person consumes about half that, or 12.2 pounds per year. At least seven other countries consume more chocolate than Americans. Americans only spent $12.8 billion on chocolate during 1998. I find this to be very interest- ing. Just think fellows, a couple of years from nowthose Valentine chocolates will actually be appre- ciated. TI HOGANSVna HOME Ngws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Tronp, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR ,.rIUPONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. R: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFW Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Business Manager ....................................................................................... laDae Goldston Staff Writers ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, Lanren King Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager. ........................................................................................ Roland Foiles Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COOTE OmcE President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Ttv, asumr .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Gatrett Legal Counsel and Assistant  .................................................... James S. OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - MAY 25, 2000 Consider All Smokers'A" My friend Rigsby, the entre- preneur, currently is hatching another of his get-rich-quick schemes. He sounded excited when he told me about his idea over lunch. "You heard smoking is now banned on all commercial flights in California, didn't you?" he asked. I said I had. There was a near riot aboard a TWA jet when smok- ers rebelled against the new anti- smoking law. "And things are just going to get worse," Rigsby went on."After April, smokers will not be allowed to light up on any flight anywhere in the country of two hours or less. There are going to be a lot of uncomfortable smokers flying around up there." I agreed, but I wanted to know where all this fits in with Rigsby's new idea. "An all-smokers' airline," he beamed. "I don't understand," I said. some airplanes and start a new airline for smokers only. You can smoke all you want on my airline. In fact, I will encourage smoking. Fligh*_ attendants will carry ciga- rettes up and down the aisle like the girls in Vegas. I'll charge five bucks a pack. A smoker who runs out of cigarettes on an airplane is a desperate individual who will pay anything for another pack." I admitted the idea had some promise. "What are you going to call your airline?" I asked Rigsby. "I've got my marketing staff on that now," he said. "We're think- hag of something that will really catch the smoking public's atten- tion. 'Black Lung Airlines' was one thought." "I don't think so," I said. "Then how: about 'Air Emphysema'?" "Keep trying." "Okay," said Rigsby, "but let me tell you what else I'm going to offer on my all-smokers' airline. "IT'S SIMPLE," Rigsby "FIRST WE'RE GOING to explained. "I'm going to lease make certain no nonsmokers "A smoker who runs out of ciga- rettes on an air- plane is a desper- ate individual..." come aboard and make life mis- erable for our customers. We will check each passenger's teeth and fingers. If they aren't yellow from smoking, they don't get a board- ing pass. "We're not going enough to need cabin tion, so our to worry about those able to smoke, willi "Our flight crew smokers, as well as our! attendants, mechanics, tionists, and boarding "But," I smoking make it on the plane?" "OF COURSE Rigsb3 we're going to issue a with passengers can find the ries regardless of how smoke is in the cabin." "When will your ad begin?" I asked my frien& "Shortly," he said. "What's your hook?" "It's a great just in the nick of teen."' am I to scoff? They Seldom Wrote He Was Cripp (Another in a series) The press had little to say about President Roosevelt's lame- ness thereafter. During his 12 years as President, there was a conspiracy engaged in by the President, the White House staff, the Secret Service and the jour- nalists who wrote about, broad- east about and took still and mov- ing pictures of Roosevelt. He was never -- well, hardly ever -- described as crippled, as unable to walk except with extreme effort and braces and other assistance. Photographers were informed on arriving at the White House that no pictures +of the President being carried by a bodyguard or in any other posture that showed him helpless or undig- nified were allowed. That includ- ed shots of Roosevelt in his wheel- chair. "You were requested, not ordered, to refrain from taking pictures of this type," Murray Alvey of Pathe, a newsreel outfit, said. So did Frank Cancallare of Acme, a service that provided still pictures for newspapers. But it was still more than a request. The first day he was assigned to the White House, Cancallare said, Steve Early, the President's press secretary, asked him not to take such pictures. "It's an unwrit- ten rule," he said. The photogra- pher asked his colleagues and found this was true. And it went beyond that, real- ly. Hugo Johnson, of Paramount News, said he was told by a Secret Service agent never to turn his movie camera on while the President was in motion. The agent said he would take his film away ffhe did. RARELY WOULD a photog- rapher assigned to the White House, or-- less rarely-- one cov- ering a presidential event for the first time, train his camera on the President in a forbidden pose. A staff aide or a Secret Service agent spotting that would say, "No pic- tures." On at least one oCcaSion, Cancallare recalled, a still photog- rapher ignored the agent and took a picture. The standard press cam- era then was the Speed Graphic, which had holders for individual film plates rather than spools of film. On that occasion when this command was ignored, the agent walked over to the photographer and yanked the plate from the hold- er. One picture of Roosevelt being pushed in his wheelchair did appear in Life magazine in 1937, but he and his attendants are in the deep background of the pho- tograph, a mere half-inch tall, and the picture conveys no sense of disability. Murray Alvey once took a -very long shot of Roosevelt being wheeled into the Waldorf Astoria for a campaign appearance. I4e was shooting the entry of other "/'here was never a public figure who was so 00ssible to the press..." ,  ....  7. notables and was surprised to see Roosevelt appear. No agents noticed, or at least none made an effort to take his film. He sent it in to his editors. It was never used. On occasion, photos showing FDR's braces were touched up by editors to eliminate the braces. According to several friends of the President, an attempt was made in 1936 by an unfriendly newspaper publisher to compile a portfolio of harmful pictures, to be published before the election. According to this story, the President's friends in the White House press corps thwarted efforts by the photographer sent to do the job. ALMOST ALL THE WHITE HOUSE regulars liked the President and were protective of him on the fact, it went beyond that. Roosevelt quoted Samm3 nalists obeyed "...He treated us well, so ed him well. ''here was never a ure who was so accessible press, who was so them and easy with treated them as equals joke with them...Then remember that he Depression days and into the war. These times and he was our hope.' done anIJaing 9_t,g,  ' the eyes of the been unthinkable." the memoirs and of White House regularS' era. "It was a condition times," said Hu wanted him to succeed." (Next week: It was a J Time.) 'THE OF WARM SPRINGS IS ATTHEGIFT: TLE WHITE HOUSE. TAINS ALL REPRINTED IN PER DURING THE pAST SALE ALL GO TO SEVELT CENTER. Memorial Day Important for A Monday, Americans will observe Memorial Day. This is a very important day for all Americans to remember. As a boy growing up in the South,.I didn't hear much about Memorial Day. I guess young- sters at this time of year have their minds on one thing -- get- ting out of school for the summer. As I grew older, this day became more important to me. cities claiming to be the birth- place of Memorial Day. President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y. as the birthplace in May 1966. But before then, Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on May 5, 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic and was first observed on May 30, 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. The south refused to acknowl- edge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I. It was then the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War I LEARNED the Northerners celebrated this day in a big way, with parades, fireworks and pic- nics to name a few. Many of the "old timers" called this special day, Decoration Day, which was its original name. There are more than a dozen to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war. CONGRESS passed into law in 1968 for the holiday to be on the last Monday in May, which will allow a three day weekend for Federal employees, several southern states have an addition- al, separate day honoring the Confederate war dead: January 19 in Texas; April 26 in Alabama, Georgia, Florida and Mississippi; May 10i0. South Carolina and June 3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee. In 1865, a druggist named Henry C. Welles of Waterloo, N.Y. Mentioned the idea at a social gathering that honor of the patri- otic dead of the Civil War should be shown by decorating their graves. In 1866, the townspeople wholeheartedly adopted the idea and placed, wreaths, crosses and bouquets on each veteran's grave. The town was decorated with flags at half mast and draped with evergreen boughs and mourning black streamers. The civic societies joined the procession as veterans way marching to to each of the town's teries. They repeated monies again 5, joined the nation in ebrated on May 30. YOU MAY ENJOY have a barbecue, or or you can visit a placed flags or flowers graves of our a memorial, fly the Flag mass until noon "National Moment Remembrance" at 3 p.m.1 and think upon the true of the day or renew aid widows, aid our More Americans lives in the Civil War War claimed the lives cent of the nation's From 1861-1865 in War, 558,052 Americans lives. From 1939-1945, Americans died in World In 1914-1918 durig War 1, 116,708 Ameriet' battle. 33,651 died in Conflict, 58,168 in Conflict and 293 in the in 1991. Let us not forget veterans, living or