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Manchester, Georgia
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May 26, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILIAS HERALD - MAY 27, 1999 THE HOGANSVILLE HERALD USPS 62O-O4O :. MIKE HAl : ,  PtIJSHER/AI)*vT, RTISING DIRF'qDR JoffN KtWKENDAI J, ASS(K:IATE PUBIJSHI.:R/EDfI'( )R M,,mON fI'JO SMmt : MNAGING EDrrOR/X:HNIC.M, DIRFk'IOR I.ANN WmaErr Busm-Ess MANAGER 2k (6rin6 ttblkatign Phone {7o6) 846-3188- Fax (706) 846-2206 Mlllard B. Grimes, President P.O. Box 426 Oi'iul Ieg, l thwart. ( "i'o! thamvdh. Chalybeate Springs For those who enjoy the :dea of an obscure event we are about to celebrate the cen- tennial of the first and pre- sumably the only serious effort to mine iron ore in Meriwether County. The Meriwether Vindi- cator, in its issue Of June 3, 1899, reported that shafts were" being sunk for the iron mine at Chalybeate and it was expected that the mine would yield over 160,000 tons of iron ore with a 60% iron content. We do not know exactly what happened but apparent- ly the mine did not turn out to be as lucrative as expected and disappeared into the pages of obscurity. The existence of iron ore and its related deposits must have been well known in that area for some years. Chalybeate was one of the earliest settlements in Meriwether County and someone who named the set- tlement must have been con- versant with geology and ancient history. The word "Chalybeate" has come to mean impregnat- ed with iron salts when refer- ring to water and thus Chalybeate Springs was water that had a large iron content. The name is derived from the Chalybes, an ancient peo- ple of Pontus in Asia Minor, now a part of Turkey. The Chalybes were skilled as workers in iron. At one time the word "Chalybean" meant metal of a superior quality. Also from Pontus were the Amazons. From the time Chalybeate Springs was settled around 1831 until the mine shafts were dug almost seventy years later, the residents had always tried to use the natu- ral treasure of the iron deposits. The first way was to get people to come and take the water as a tonic. They called it lithia water and it was adver- tised as having the highest iron content as any spa in the world. Chalybeate Springs was a spa community. From 1870 until 1924 the resort there was in operation although its glory days declined after the turn of the century. In its heyday the Grant House could accommodate 500 guests in the hotel or in guest cottages. There was a skating rink, constant band music at a pavil- ion; carriage rides on top of Columni00 the mountain and extensive swimming pools. A Chalybeate Springs was established in Texas in the 1840s and there is a Chalybeate, Mississippi but ours seems to have been the first. In 1908, Chalybeate Springs was doing so well they had the town incorporated. That beat Manchester by one year. The date when the town charter was surrendered may be known to some but it is dif- ficult to find in the records. If they had reflected on the future as they began to dig their iron mine one hundred years ago, those enterprising men doubtless would have been disturbed to know that one hundred years later their mine would be gone and for- gotten as well a the bustling spa and all its activities. Not only gone but vanished without almost a trace. The dream of developing this region for tourism never disappeared, however, and there are still those who think of all of the wealth of advert ture which still awaits in the water and beneath the ground. Still there waiting on the next pioneers with vision to make something of it. If nothing else there are still those carriage rides on the mountain, there is unpar- alleled beauty, and there is community--items which are more difficult to find than iron ore in our day and age. THE HtmASSWU.E HEta is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $15m Meriwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxgs. Second class postage paid at HogansviUe, Georgia 30230. Fen strascmPnoNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansvine, Georgia 30230. Publisher and Advertising Director ................... . ...................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ...................................................... John Kuykendall Managing Editor and Technical Director ........................ ;....:..Marion (Ted) Smith Business Manager ............................................................................. Lee.Ann W'flbert Assodate Editors .............. Billy Bryantfralbotton, Michael Snider/Harris County Dan Stout/Hogansville, Caroline Yeager/Greenville Advertising Sales ..................................................................................... Linda l.ester Photography i ........................................................................................ Michael Snider Features ...................................................................................................... Lani A. Pike Composing .................................................................... Valinda Ivery, Melissa Pierce Legals ....................................................................................................... Valinda lvery Receptionist and Classifieds .................................................................... Cleta Young Pressroom .............................................................. David Boggs, Wayne Grochowski Com, oaw Ovcv.ns President ............................................................................................... Millard Grimes Vice President ............................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................. : ..................................................... Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer ................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .......................................... James S. Grimes Strikes Should Stop for Everyone's After over two months of NATO air strikes in Yugoslavia, it seems that allied and con- gressional support for the air war is ending, partly because of an increasing number of bombing blunders on hospitals, embassies, ethnic refugees and rebel fighters. Where the fault lies for these mistakes is not clear. Senate Majority Leader I?ent Lott says the air war's mis- lakes are unfairly blemishing the U.S. military which has been ent on a mission that air power alone cannot win. Pres. Bill Clinton says NATO s more unified now than when the bombing began on March 24, although not without differ- ences. He says that while there may be differences in domestic cir- cumstances, cultural ties to the Balkans and ideas on tactics, there is no question about unity on goals and the will to prevail. Secretary of State Madeline Albright says that the air strikes would eventually force Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic to agree to NATO's peace terms. Still, allies and some con- gressional leaders have clearly become edgy in recent weeks as incidents causing civilian casualties through mistaken attacks continue to pile up. Thirteen incidents have been claimed thus far by Yugoslavia or admitted by NATO. Seven were in May with as many as 312 people being killed, including ethnic Albanian civil- ians and members of the rebel Kosovo Liberation Army. NATO says there have been over 26,000 flights over Yugoslavia with over 15,000 bombs dropped or missiles fired, and that its mistake rate is less than one percent. Air Force Maj. Gen. Charles Wald says that NATO will do verything it can to make sure e targets identified are valid military targets. The big question being tossed around now between the leaders of NATO countries con- ceres the use of ground troops. Sen Lott says Congress should Bob Tribble Former Publ00 continue to ,support the air strike decision since it has been made, but he is not in support of sending in ground troops to "fight their way in there. The president has repeated- ly told the American people that we would not use ground troops in a combat mode there," he said. A German Foreign Ministry official Ludger Volmer says ground troops are not a topic for discussion but British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook indicated that bombing was not enough saying that NATO must prepare to deploy troops, with or without resistance from Yugoslav security forces. So, here we are involved in a militar that we might should gotten involved in that resulted in the deaths of dreds of innocent people. Military minds things are going to happen, we must accept when we become such actions. Let me assure you mind is anything itary, but I haw if we had any business ing involved in the air in the first place. No doubt the air worked in Desert Storm, thus far we haven't had thatl cess, it seems, in Yul Maybe the two are entirely different. My prayers are that we bring this air war to a ( sure for the benefit of all cerned, and that will not be a topic for discussion. If you feel led, I invite i to join me in this endeavor. Polio Can't Stop Roosevelt's Career (Part three in a series) Poliomyelitis is an age-old disease. Scientists have found that it existed in the pre- Christian era. But the first written records of this disease that leaves between half and three-quar- ters of its victims with some degree of leg, arm or trunk paralysis appeared in 1835 in Great Britain. Several epidemics occur- red there, and in the United States in the 19th century. The disease is caused by a virus so small that its discovery td'  come until the first decade o( this century, when it was also first proved in a laboratory that the disease is infectious. In 1916 the disease broke into the American public's con- sciousness and became a dread- ed scourge. In that year, the 20 states that kept records of infec- tious diseases reported 27,367 cases and 7,179 deaths. In New York City alone there were 9,023 cases and 2,448 deaths. One student of that epidem- ic estimates that, when unre- ported very mild cases of polio are taken into account, it is like- ly that almost every New York family was affected by the 1916 outbreak. Polio was, in the first part of the 20th century, mostly a dis- ease of the middle classes. The virus is found in untreated sewage, and the infection comes from unclean food or water, introduced into the body through the nose or mouth. The very poor commonly came into contact with the virus as infants in their unsanitary slums. At that stage of muscular development, the virus' assault on the brain and nervous sys- tem did no damage. It did, however, give the infant a lifetime immunity to polio. Franklin Roosevelt, even more than the average member of his class, was shielded from the infectious diseases of infan- cy and early childhood. His childhood diseases came late. He had scarlet fever at 14, mumps and measles at 16, prob- ably because he didn't start school until late. Roosevelt was the sort of individual for whom a crippling disease represent- ed a special tragedy. Although he was never an outstanding athlete -- he was cut from the freshman football team at Harvard -- he was an enormously energetic and phys- ically active individual. He liked to swim, ice boat, sail, fish, ride, play tennis and golf. He even liked calisthenics. Even more to the point, in his professional life he liked to go, to see firsthand and close up the people and problems he had to deal with. His whole personality 'seemed to depend on that move- ment, that energy. It was cen- tral to what is now called 'image'. "He would leap over a rail rather than open a gate," one of his sons said of him. There is a picture of him in the National Archives as Assistant Secretary of the Navy that shows as well as anything what polio claimed. FDR is shown, dapper and slim, aloft in the rigging of a ship on an inspection tour. You look at that picture and think that to take away that man's legs would be an ironic punishment of Greek, almost Biblical, inten- sity. Yet he overcame that blow, denied it, actually, and con- vinced the world to do the same. The story of the attack is a well-known bit of American lore. It took place at the family retreat on Campobello Island off the coast of Maine, where Franklin Roosevelt had spent The Squire of Warm Spflngs summers since 1883, the year after he was born. As an adult, his stays were often brief. The family had gone without him in 1916, during the polio scare. Franklin, Jr. had been born there ".In 1914, ..... In 1921, pfter eight busy years in Washington, Roosevelt was able to get away for an extended vacation at Campobello for the first time in nearly a decade. His aide and political adviser, Louis Howe, was also going to vacation here. Roosevelt thought he would run for governor of New York in 1922. He had become a nationally known Democratic leader in 1920, when he was his party's vice presidential nominee onthe losing James M. Cox ticket. He could even reasonably dream and plan on a presiden- tial nomination in 1924, though he would be only 42 years old, and though no wealthy aristo- crat had won the Democratic party's presidential nomination in modem times. Roosevelt joined his family at Campobello at the beginning of August after a yacht trip up with the Baltimore financier and publisher Van Lear Black. He threw himself into the vigors of a Rooseveltian vaca- tion, though he said once he could not shake the feeling of tiredness he had brought with him. On August 19 he spent a par- ticularly wearying day, sailing, fighting a brush fire, taking two swims. The next morning he had trouble getting out of bed. n ess and paralysis in legs. DrEben Bennett, the clan from nearby Lubec had delivered Franklin, thought it was j on the following day, could not stand, Eleanor Louis Howe and Dr. find a specialist in one of many nearby They found Dr. W.W. of Philadelphia. He Roosevelt, diagnosed his dy as 'a blOOd "Cl0t'i spinal cord., ...... ' ....... massage, wrong treatment for affected muscles at stage. Later, he sent a bill $600, a shock often expressed outrage Not satisfied with diagnosis, the family down another renowned eialist, Dr. Robert Boston orthopedist. He Campobello on August 25, immediately diagnosed Both he and Dr. Bennett t Roosevelt i Dr. Lovett's prognosis in retrospect, a the effect that ff Roosevelt's to be active was he should legs. To the Roosevelts, at time, the words: must seemed more optimistic the doctor intended. Dr. Bennett mistic still " " ily and Roosevelt that', "be all right." Dr. Lovett that Roosevelt go tO a for further merit. On September 13 after he was stricken York City's Hospital. (Continued next week). 'Chill Out With Books' at Hogansville "Chill Out With Books" is the theme of Hogansville Public Library's Summer Reading Club for 1999. "Primary pro- grams are scheduled for chil, dren ages three to seven. Intermediate for children ages eight to eleven. Special incentivesprograms are planned for young adults ages twelve and older. Ages for the programs are recommend- ed; anyone is welcome any time. Everyone who signs up receives a certificate. June 3 is COOL TREAT sign- up day. Come in and sign up between 10:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. and get a cool treat. On June 10, stories from snow and ice coun- tries are featured. Frankie Wiggins presents the Primary Program at 10:30 a.m. and Yvonne Bledsoe pres- ents the Intermediate Program at 1:30 p.m. Magician David Ginn, pres- ents his program of "Frozen Magic" on June 17 at 1:30 p.m. in the Senior Center. The com- munity is invited to a program for all ages. Arctic Animals is the topic on June 24. Jean Crocker pres- ents the Primary Program at 10:30 a.m. and Carol Cain pres- ents the Intermediate Program at 1:30 p.m. On July 1, Pat Gay, story- teller from LaGrange Memorial Library, invites the community to a program for all ages at the Library news Jane tham GottshL Brarch Manager Senior Center at 1:30 p.m. Yvonne Bledsoe presents: Chilling Stories about Famous Americans on July 8. The Primary Program is at 10:30 a.m. and the Intermediate Program is at 1:30 p.m. On July 15, storytener Akbar Imhopet, returns this year per- forming a program for all ages at 1:30 p.m. at the Senior Center. The community is invitetL July 19 is the last in completed book list awards. Recognition and programs are scheduled July 22 including door and refreshments. The Primary. scheduled at 10:30 a.m. and p.m. ' ' All to attend our Summer Club = July. Our "Pre-School for ages three to five Hogansville Public scheduled to begin agailt August.