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Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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May 27, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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May 27, 2004
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HGME NEWS LISPS 620-040 JOHN KUYKI~NDALL PUBLISt IER]EI)ITOR LAURIE L~ws ADVERTISING D1REC_TD.)R GLINT C~+AYBROOK A.~ X:IA't'E EDr|X)R ROB RICHARDSON ASSIST~,NT EDrlX)R A (6rimt~ ~ublh:ati~n Millard B. Grimes, President Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2~ P. O. I:~x 426 Hogansvflle, Georgia 30230 It's West Nile Virus And Protection ane Several mosquito-borne viruses circulate in Georgia each year and are capable of causing disease in humans and other animals. The most common mosquito-borne viruses in Georgia include West Nile virus, Eastern Equine encephalitis virus, and LaCrosse virus. Saint Louis encephalitis virus has also been detected in Georgia in the past. Mosquito-borne viruses are most active late spring through early fall in. 80 percent of people (about 4 Georgia. Local health officials are warning everyone, as the warmer weather approach- es, to be sure and take pre- ventive measures to protect themselves against such dis- eases. Mosquitoes carry mos- qOito-borne viruses such as LaCrosse Encephalitis (LAC), West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEE). Those carrying such viruses often breed around homes where standing water col- lects in items such as flower- pots, wheelbarrows and gut- ters. Mosquitoes also com- monly breed in water that stays in discarded tires. Last year, Georgia report- ed 55 people infected with WNV, as well as two with EEE infection and one with LAC infection. Preventive meas- ures can help prevent those numbers this year. West Nile virus (WNV) is a potentially serious illness. Experts believe WNV is established as a seasonal epi- demic in North America that flares up in the summer and continues into the fall. Symptoms of WNV? WNV affects the central nervous system. Symptoms vary. Serious Symptoms in a Few People. About one in 150 people infected with WNV will develop severe ill- ness. The severe symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stu- even healthy people have been sick for several weeks. No Symptoms in Most People. Approximately out of 5) who are infected with WNV will not show any symp- toms at all. PREVENTION IS always important to fighting dis- eases, but in the case of WNV, it is the only weapon we have. In order to help prevent large populations of mosqui- toes breeding near homes, people should conduct a weekly clean-up of their properties to get rid of any standing water. Don't forget to check screens on windows and doors to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home. The Division of Public Health conduct surveillance year-round for mosquito- borne viruses. Recently, pub- lic health officials identified increasing numbers of some niosquito species in southern and coastal Georgia. Large numbers of mosquitoes increase the likelihood of peo- ple catching mosquito-borne diseases. When outside, it is impor- tant to remember to wear DEET-based repellent and long sleeve shirts and pants. Adults should use an insect repellent containing up to 35% DEET. Children over the age of two should be sprayed with a product con- taining 19% DEET or less. When using repellents, be sure to read and follow the manufacturers directions for use printed on the product. Pregnant women, nurs- ing mothers, and parents of children under:the age of two pot, disorientation, c0gm, years old should contact their tremors, convulsions, tousle health department or health- weakness, vision loss, num~ care provider before using ness and paralysis. These~ products containing DEET. symptoms may last several \~+ ' Birds in the area have weeks, and neurological ~already been found and test- ed for WNV already this sea- son. Some of them have test- ed positive for the virus. So, it is important that everyone try to help keep the commu- nity as free of mosquitoes as possible. If you would like to know mo .reabout V~V you may visit the state's website at http J/www.health.state. ga.us. or contact you health depart- ment+ effects may be permanent. Milder Symptoms in Some People. Up to 20 per- cent of the people who become infected will display symptoms which can include fever, headache, and body aches, nausea, vomiting,'~d sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. Symptoms can last for as short as a few days, though THE I't(K;ANSVILLE HOME NEWS iS published weekly by the Star-Mercury PuNishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 305 ] Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Tr(mp, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes~ Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230,Single copy 50. FOR St B."iCRilq'tO~ call' (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426. Manchester, Ge~ia 31816. I~SqT+tASTI,:R: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Editor ............................................................................ John Kukyendall Advertising Director ................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Asstnfiate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Cla3 brook Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Ric~son Staff Writers .......................................................................... B~an Geter. Billy Bryant Com~x~sition .............................. l~ayne Flowers, Robert Weems. Gaff Youngblood Circulation Manager. ................ : ......................................................... Ttacy Lynn W5 art P~ss Manager ................................................................................. Wax ne Grocho~ skl Plx_~ssrt~m~ Assistants ................... Zaddie Dixon,l)arnell McCaule3 Mait~)m Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs COP.PORATE OFFiCerS Pt~,'~ident ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Excx'utive Vice President and Secreta~~. ....................................... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Coun~l and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVIIA2E HOME NEWS - THURSDAY, I~IAY 27, 2004 Pain of Mother's New From Lewis Grizzard's coUec~on "lf Love Were Off, I'd Be About a Quart Lo~' Written in 1979 The next day H.B. was all they could talk about. 'Tour mother met herself a boyfriend last night," chid- ed my Uncle John. 'They have a date tonight, too," said my Aunt Una. "Isn't that exciting?" About as exciting as danc- ing with Alice McTavish, I thought. The pangs of fear and jeal- ousy were fierce. Who was this H.B. person, and what was he doing messing around my mother? This was my first episode of jealousy. (Unfortunately, it would not be my last.) It was an odd feel- ing, a terrible feeling. It made my stomach hurt and it made me dizzy. I wanted to cry. I wanted to lash out at some-. one. I thought of calling my father. He would put a stop to this nonsense. But the last I heard of him, he was in Mississippi someplace with a carnival that was heading west. I confronted my mother. "He's anice man," she said. "I don't care," I replied, fighting back the tears. My mother had a way of explaining things to me. She would kneel down, look me squarely in the face, look into my eyes and smile, and when she was finished talking to me, she would draw me near her and I would understand. But not this time. +tell him I hate him," I said. "I can't do that," said my mother. "You'll like him. I want you to meet him tonight when he comes to get me." Two nights in a row! Two nights in a row I would be left at home without my mother. When the dreaded H.B. arrived, I hid under the bed. I likely would still be there, had my grandmother not taken a broom and flushed me out as if I were a dog. I wouldn't shake H.B's hand when he offered it to me. I wouldn't speak, and I buried my face in my hands so that I wouldn't have to look at him. For once in my life, I wished mymother dipped snuff. That would keep him away from her. THEY M.4J{RIED at the Moreland Methodist Church five days after my 10th birth- day. My grandfather would- n't go to the ceremonies, so they asked me to give the bride away. That likely was my grandmother's idea, what with her fiendish insistence that when somebody was going to get punished,1 take an integral arrangements. I said my albeit sotto voce. week's honeymoon, came back to my ent's house, where we, live until a new home be built a few hundred away on acreage ously had served as a field. ...to be BY SPFA::IAL WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, HOME EI) COLUMNS BY THE BY MO~, MOST WIDELY READ WRrmR OF ms rv~ PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC STORES WIDE. What Lies Beyond Death's I remember watching a religious news broadcast, in which a reporter walked the streets of a major U.S. city. This reporter approached several young men and women, appearing to range from 20 -30 years old, and asked this question, "What do you think will happen after you die?" The answers varied from I don't know, to I don't care, to nothing, to reincarnation. The portion of the reporter's survey I watched did not show anyone with a scriptur- al view of life after death. THAT SUBJECT has f8s- cirtated a~d+ pt~zl~d people f0~ |ffe'z~'J~t]~/+hundreds+ of years. The oldest book in the Bible is probably the book of Job, and in that book the ques- tion is asked, "If a man die shall he live again?" (Job 14:14) Is it possible to know the truth about what happens beyond death's door? Can we know What will happen to us once we depart this life? One of the most impor- tant things a person needs to know about death is the mean- ing, contrary to the thinking of some, death is not a cessa- tion of existence. The bibhcal idea of death is separation. Although when we see a person die and the physical life is removed from the body, that person has not ceased to exist. Physical death is a sepa- ration of the spirit from the body. Our physical body is simply a dwelling place for the spirit of life. When death occurs,+that spirit~f life just , ~ .... changes dwelling~s. BUt, not only does the Bible speak ..... of physical death, but it also speaks of spiritual death. Just like physical death, spiritual death is also a separation. This separation is the soul from the presence of God. The most important thing a person needs to know about death is not when they will die, but how. There are only 'q'o follow you, I am not content, until I know which Way yOU Went." a person can die in Christ or they can die without Christ. Matthew 2S:46 says, "And these shall go aWay into ever- lasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal." To die in Christ is to find Heaven your dwelling place, and die without Christ is to find Hell your dwelling place. TO ANSWER the tion Job asked years ago, we that when this body itslife, where. It is reported that Indiana cemetery there tombstone over a years old this taph: "Pause, you pass me by, as you I now, so once was I. As now, so you will be, pare for death, and mef Someone that and etched this reply These words are Dr. James Merritt said most important thing death is not death itself, what follows death." May we open the God and take a peek at is really behind and make the preparations. rsAgo Inthe Hogansville Herald ~tothe ttogan~vM~ Home New~ MODERN MARVELS- salk vaccine for polio was being tes~ ed. The May 27, 1954 Hogansville Herakt reported that, "School childr~ by the thousands have lined up in number of states to receive the tions and in a few months the will probably know whether this va~" cine will fulfill the promise expected from iL" ENDING OF AN ERA - An inside story reported that M.E. campaigning for governor, that, 'Segregation will continue in the state." Thompson cited unattnbuted sources that claimed that 95 percent of the blacks wanted to segregated, and that 100 whites did, too. CINEMA TIME- The Theatre apparently Hogansville residents could either watch westerns or exotic-adventure movies that week. Offerings were "Gypsy Colt," featuring "MGM's amaz- ing animal star who (X~luers of the wast," Whunderhoof," (starring a horse of the same narne), "The Man From Sundown" and "The Charge at Feather River." Folks who wanted action without oowboys could choose either "Fort Algiers" or "Appointment in Honduras." DISH IS A GOOD DEAL - Belk- Gallant had 12,500 dishes to sell. Cups were 19 cents, saucers were seven for $1, soup bowls four for $1 and plates were four for $1. *WANT AD WONDERS " =rlouses fo rent with rnodem conven- iences: water, lights, baths."