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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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May 31, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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May 31, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas t ,( t.; 4 - HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS - MAY 31, 2001 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620040 A (6nsz Julflicathut Millerd El. Grimes, Ptsidtmt MIKE HAlk PLrBI.1SI WIoAl)\\;q 3lTIStN( ; D!R), )i: JOHN KUYKENI)M I. A%%(K)IATE PUB/1SI tl,2L ] )ll }} BRYAN GE'I;R AS'L\\;Jt l)lit }I'{ JAW; Gou)swox BI SINFZ% I \\;NAGKR |)bone (706) Fdr-3188 Eax (7t5) S4t ;!2t, P (). Box 426 Ilogmasville. (;(ngia 502.40 How To Know If You're Now Older This past weekend I realized .just how old I'm getting. My rid- ing mower went on the fritz and I had to cut my very large yard with a push mower. Man, was I ever tired when I finished. It seems like only a few years ago I was a young boy growing up on a farm in Harris County. Every summer I spent my day working in the garden or pitch- ing hay bails onto a truck or into the hay loft of our barn. I could tote feed bags with the best of them If I had to do those things today, I'm not sure I would sur- vive. Either I've gotten lazy and weak over the years, or age is catching up to me. I'm pretty sure it's the latter. As reality set in from push- hag that moweL I started to thank about how getting older had changed my life. While I know that's dangerous (thinking) for a person like me, I chanced it any- way. After all, too much thinking and I could easily die from brain shock. However, I determined there are ten sure fire signs that you're getting older and I would like to share them with my read- Jolm Another thing I've noticed that seems to come.with age is all the money you save on haircuts. I don't seem to need haircuts as often today as I did a couple of years ago. My hairdresser has been very nice about the way she tells me things about taldng care of my hair now For example, "You know John, if you were to wear your part a little different no one would notice you're thiniling a lit - tie here." You know why it cost more to live when you get older? It's because of all the money you spend on doctors. When I was in my 20s and 30s I was lucky to see a doctor once a year for a check- up. Now he calls if he doesn't hear from me every two weeks. He ers. just wants to make sure I'm still S"S alive. One of the most vivid , StmaldngOfthat, anbthertdgn that you're getting older is is toting medicine in yore" pock you begin to read the newspaper at arms length or drop the glass- es to the end of your nose. Of course hearing becomes a little more difficult. Well, I'm not sure that's entirely true. You see, I'm accused by my better half all the time of having selective hear- ing. So, it could be that or it could be that we just don't understand things as well as we used to. Could it be that the brain associates things a little slower when we get older? There could be something to that. You see, when I was a young man I didn't forget anything. Today, I have trouble remember- ing my home phone number. Another sure fire sign of get- ting older is that your clothes seem to shrink more each da: it seems now that each and every time my clothes are washed they draw a little. Or is it that clothes are just made smaller today? IWo years ago a 36 waist fit me fine, today it's a 42. I haven't gained that much weight, even though my family and my doctor think SO. et. I never even had a antacid in my pocket when I was a young marl. Conversation is different when you grow older. When m> friends and I got together when we were young, we talked about fast cars, fast women, and sports. Toda}; we talk about our ailments and if any time is left over we talk about the good old days. Speaking of cars, when I was a young man I couldn't pass a ser- vice station because my car was fast and was a gas hog. Today, I can't pass the service station, but it's because of the need to use the men's room. Believe me, I think they've changed cokes. There's more water in them. And finally, the tenth and most clear sign that you are getting old. Today, when I compliment a woman onher dress.:.. I'm real- ly looking at the dress. If you have any of the above signs, just relember... Never mind, because if,ou do have an of these signs, you,'ll probably fo> get hhis column in anatter of min- utes. . We welcome your letwrs. them to: The Hogansville Home News P O. Box 426 Ho" e, Georgia 30230 Please fax them to: 706-846-2206 THV H(R;ANSVRE HOME NEWS is blished weekly  fle Star-Melvin 3 Pubtiqhi.g Company. a diviskm of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Rooeveh Higtma>, Manchester, (keoia 31816. U SPS 621. Subriplieat rotes by mail: $16 in Troup. Heard or Menu ether Counties: $20 a year elwherc. Prices include all sales taxes, Periodical W,,qage paid m Hogansville, Ge2zia 30230, FOR suiis,ca!l [706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercu) Ndlicatkms, E O. Box 426. Manchest, GcxKgia 3 t816, POSTtqR: Send address chges to P. O. Box 420 Ftcgansxillc. G,\\; 30230, N'IAFV Piblisber and Advcnismg Director .................................................................. Mike [ lale Assoc'iale Ptthlisher and Editor ......... . ......................................  .............. John Ku3 kcndall Ass('ia|e |itor ............................................ : ...................... : .................... : ......... Bz 3 an Gewr Assistam b)Jitor ....................... :. .................................................................. Rob Richardson Business Manager ................. ................................................................... Jayne Goldston SmffWriter .................. . ................................................... MicNwl (. Snidm: Billy BDam Assistant Adverfising Manager ........................... : ............................................ Lamie icy. s Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. l,inda l,clcr Assist |itor ............ ] ............................................................................. Rob Richu'd,o. ( omtxing ..................................................... VaJinda lveu l)cbon Smith. Lauren King LcgMs ............ , ................. : ............................................................................ Jayne Cioldton RcceNionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Clcta 5img Pmssmm .........................  ..................................................................... Wa) ne (jl'.ho ski Pmssnxm ..................................... : .................................................................... Dakl Bo?g CO)RTE OFtct:ts President .................................................................................................... Millard B, Gdme Vice sident ...................................................................................... Cha'lotte S. Grimes ret-y ................................................................................................ Laura Grime. Cofi:r Treas ................................. : ............................................................. Kathy Grimes Gmret LegN Counl and Assismn! Secretary, .................................................... 1ames S. Grime Much Can Be-Learned by \\;\'e all iearn some things from prosperity but we learn many more things from adversiD: And oftentimes adversity will build character much faster than pros- perity. CNN founder Ted Tuyner, who has experienced much prosperi- ty during his lifetime, appears to be experiencing some adversity. After the breakup of his marriage to Jane Fonda and his loss of con- trol of "Ihrner Broadcasting in the AOL Time Warner reorganization, qhrner said in an interview that he was suicidal. The New Yorker magazine tuoted qhrner as saying that he "'felt 1Ne Job," when he was refer- ring to his despondency last year. The story gave no further details, but mentioned that Turner's father committed suicide when Ted was 24 years old. IN ADDITION to his business and marital problems, Turner broke his foot in a skiing accident and has experienced back prob- lems since last year. In the magazine interview, Turner said his marriage to Fonda broke up partly because of her decision to become a Christian. "'She just came home and said, 'I've become a ,Christian.' Before that she was not a religious person. That is a pretty big change for your wife of many years to tell you. That's a shock." TURNER has stated that he is a nonbeliever, having lost his faith after his sister, Mary Jane, passed away from a rare disease several years ago. "I was taught that God was love and God was powerful," he said. "And I could not under- stand how someone so innocent should be made, or allowed, to suf- fer so." Fonda told the magazine that her becoming a Christian had upset Ted very much and for good reason. "He was my husband and I chose not to discuss it with him because he would have talked me out of it. He's a debating champi- on," she said. Fonda alSO said that Turner knew that the birth of her grand- child would keep her away from home more. "He needs someone to be with him one hundred per- cent of the time. He thinks that's love. It is not love. It is baby-sit- ting, so we went in different direc- tions. I grew up," she said. Looking back on his upbring- ing, Turner describes himself as "He told The blew Yorker that his father was often drunk, beat him and sent him to m//itary schooL" iii I i, a super achiever. He told The hlev Yorker that his father was often drunk, beat him and sent him to military school. "He (his father) thought that people who were harder, and I bly true," Turner said. think I have ever met achiever who was not some degree. A super someone who is never WITHOUT a Turner is a most certainly has himself. He has heights of prosperity, where along the way ly turned loose of his his faith in Go& of my favorite people. difficult for me to of "treason" against uniform in Vietnam I rejoice at her  a Christian. A young bo; ready interrupted a family the living room. "I am now and say my want anything?" Yes, we all learn from prosperity, but many more things from pray that Ted Turner to God as he struggles adversities. Friendship Was Best Item on the After a recent late morning ineeting I drove over to the Culpepper House in Senoia where they serve such a wonderful lunch in that elegant, southern B&B style for which they are known far and wide. Upon entering the lovely old Victorian home, I asked for a quiet corner table for one. Maggie told me I was in luck, that it was a real- ly quiet day. It was I p.m. and the place had jusI cleared out. I was, m fact, now the only patron. That was a good thing. Unusual, but good. the kitchen. One course after another she served me with true southel grace and charm. }Yrst, there were the scones with jam mad cream..Then came the toma- to bisque garnished with fresh herbs. (She and her partner grow their own herbs, along with much of their produce.) The main course was a beautifully pre- sented assortment of quiche, sandwiches, pasta and fruit. Then followed the dessert, homemade cherry ice cream with a to-die- for slice of chocolate cake. SHE SAID the tea would soothe me. A special blend. A house secret. She gave me two little packs to take with me. She said each pack would make three cups. I felt a little like the guy (or girl) in the movies who lingers long at the deserted bar and tells the barkeeper all his problems. Maggie picked up right away on the fact that I was not having a good day. Although I did not have lots of problems, the one big one that haunted me haunted hard. After my meeting, I had fig- ured I could treat myself to a real- ly special lunch or just go home and have a pity party. Seemed like a no-brainer, to me so the lunch won out. MAGGIE AND I got to talk- ing about two really wonderful folk art prints that are displayed over the tea ff ervice buffet. One depicts what it must have been like at a quilting bee a hundred or so years ago. The other is an old fashioned dinner on the grounds at a beautiful lit- tle country church of yesteryear. I like the prints. We talked about how both of our clads had been Baptist preach- ers - of the sort that pastored such country churches. We miss our fathers. We wondered if any real old-fashioned baptisms ever took place anymore in America. (If you know of any area congrega- tions who still" gather by the river" write to me at PO Box 246, Gay, GA 30218.) Like I said, it really was not a good day. For me. And Maggie didn't give up until she bad cheered me up. I owe her. Just in case you are not real pleased with your present circumstances or with the way this present day is : ? ') "Although I did not have lots of problems, the one big one that haunted me haunted hard." unfolding let me share with you a copy of something Maggie gave me to take with me as I left that day. She called it something else to think about. It worked. I regret that neither she nor I know the author. I always hesi- tate to print such as this without giving credit to whom credit is due But some things are just too good to pass up. If you are ever over Senoia way, check out thefollowing list that Maggie and taped to their back door if you measure up. Things that a knows: The difference hissie fit and a Pretty much how make up a mess; What wumpus is; How long "directly" "going to town, be That "gimme mean pass the sugar; How to handle likker" When "by and by  is; near" and" a right neck, a good or boy and tras00 Never to go snipe twice; Never to assume other car with the is actually going to The best a neighbor who's got plate of cold tater salad. There was no cold: on the "tour" menu that I: that day, so much better. A withatruly served up what was with a real generous friendship on the side. Church Starts Summer With Busy As you pray; remember Bob Tillman, Louise Wilson, Press Miller, Howard Willis, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Neighbors, Pauline Powers, Evelyn Arnold, Freda Kelley, Don=ny Faulkner, David Shearouse, Rev. Ron Howard, Marcellite Broussard, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Moore, Wendy Irvin, Eddie Shell, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cottingham, Logan Wilson, Mozelle Dial, Jearinette Johnson and Angela Barley. Also pray for the Southern Baptist Convention as it meets in June at New Orleans. Worship with the Word was by Latisha Mitchem (Deuteronomy 6: 6-7). The Children's Sermon was by Beth Maxwell. Special music Sunday morn- ing was a solo "God Forbid" ren- dered by Sondra Lee. Rev. Willis' sermon Sunday morning was "As For Me and My House" (Joshua 24: 14-16). Rev. A1 Patterson spoke on his mission trips to Jamaica and showed slides Sunday night at our church. He is Associational Missionary for Copper Basin Baptist , . Association in Copp'erhill, Tennessee. Our pas: tot has made six trips to Jamaica with them. Another trip is planned for July 27-August 3 mad ff you are interested in going and teaching VBS or preaching at the crusade, start praying about it now. Congratulations m Chris Cross upon his graduation June 1 from Arlington Christian School. City Employee Recognition Day is June 3 at our church at 11:00 a.m. They will be honored during this service. A church- wide covered-dish lunch will immediately follow in the church fellowship hall. All city employees are cordially invit- ed. This includes the Mayor, City Council, City Manager, Police Department and all city work- ers with their families. A benefit singing for Michael Bailey, a 16-year-old Muscular Dystrophy patient, will be at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Purgason on Sunday afternoon, June 3 at 3:00 p.m. Michael is a patient at Egleston Children's Hospital and has been for quite some time. He is able to come home, but needs a respirator in order to do so. Proceeds from this ben- efit singing will be used to pur- chase one. If you cannot attend the benefit, but would like to make a donation, you may do so by contacting Corinth Baptist Church in the Corinth commu- nity. Any help would be great- ly appreciated for this worthy cause. Family night supper (cov- ered-dish) and the monthly organizational meetings will be at our church Wednesday Right, June The Betty Canter Circle meets at the church Monday, June 11. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Campbell and their grandson, Drew Campbell spent Memorial Day weekend with relatives in Mr. and Mrs. Tom attended the Tntt reunion at Dadeville, on Sunday, May 27. Mr. and Mrs. Winkles and Mrs. all of Sulphur, Ring a few days with Mrs. Joel.ee returned home after Daytona and Orlando, Our pleted the Baptist Study, Amazing Initiative, Our night during the ing. Needed for School are: potato chips, drinks .and an during Please bring items church. Any church office. The views expressed on the Opinion Page of the Hogansville Home are the expressions and ideas of each writer and do not neoessar, reqect the opinions of the