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Manchester, Georgia
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June 6, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
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June 6, 2002
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLW HOME NEWS'JUNE 6, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs s2o.o, lO A (rtwz b[katu MIIlard B. Grimes, Presiclent MII thtz PUADVERTISING DIRF_L'TOR JOHN KUVZmAUL Assoctaax PumasrroR RoB RIN AsslsTatcr EDrrOR JAYNE GOILISrON BusrNEss ILMqAG ER me Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogmaswille, Georgia 30230 Don't Be Afraid to Make a Mistake... Much has been said about the possible "missed clues" by the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) prior to the September 11 terroristic acts. While much has been said, nothing can be done to change what has happened. If you are a weekly read- er of my column, you will remember that last year I stated in one of my columns there were problems inside the FBI. As a matter of fact, a local reader took exception to it. As a former FBI agent, I can see how he would. Having said all of that, let me tell you where I stand today on this particular issue. If the FBI did miss clues that could have prevented the September 11 tragedy, then those that overlooked those clues will have to live with that mistake. I personally find it hard to believe that any FBI agent would pur- posely look the other way if they found clues. I think it was simply a mistake, unless corruption was involved, and I don't believe that for one minute. On Wednesday, May 29, FBI Director Robert Mueller admitted there could have been missed clues. So, we (Joe public) will have to assume there probably were some. It's unfortunate if that is true, but if it is, it's not going to change what happened. One thing is for sure, there is not a soul in this great nation that would not give anything to change what hap- pened on September 11. Now, even months after the fact, we stillmourn those that lost their lives, still shudder when we think of the tragedy, and pray that nothing like this will ever happen on our soil again. WHILETHEFBIISUnder scrutiny right now, and I'm one of their worst critics, I'll have to say this has done some good, as far as theFBI is concerned. For starters, it has caused the FBI and the United States government to consider how improvements can be made in our national security efforts. Security in interna- tional airports has been improved since the hijack- hags as well. So, we are now a little safer. Mueller also announced a broad reorganization of the nation's premier law enforce- ment agency after making the statement that had inves- tigators recognized the importance of the data they were collecting, the September 11th hijackings 'The trick to being successful in any- thing is not being o#aia to a mis- take, but to learn from your mistake." might have been detected. Mueller said he will be moving hundreds of agents, mostly from drug investiga- tions, to focus on terrorism and the prevention of future attacks. THE FBI IS not the blame for what happened on September 11. If they missed clues, that is unfortunate, but even if the clues had been found, followed up on and every T crossed and every I dotted, that is not guarantee this would not have hap- pened. We can begin to think about what ifs, we need to concentrate on what now. As I said, the only thing good that has come from this, is hopefully we have learned a valuable lesson in the war on terrorism, and that is to never let our guard dowrL We must constantly be on the look out for future attacks and put a tremendous amount of energy and efforts into preventing those attacks. While I can be critical of the FBI at timds, I realize what a difficult job they have. They are charged with the total security of our nation, that some pretty big shoes to f: We mu give them cred- it where credit is due. The Bureau has done a tremendous amount of good for this nation over the years and, while they have made mistakes a long the way, their win ratio is pretty good. After all, everyone makes mistakes. I've made a few myself, and am pretty sure . I'll make a few more before "I leave God's green earth. However, when I make a mis- take, I learn from it. The trick to being suc- cessful in anything is not being afraid to make a mis- take, the trick is, when you do make one, learn from it. THE HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing C(nnpany, a division of Grimes ons. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Peritxtical ix-stage paid at Hogansville,  30"2_30. FOR suBscRivrl( call (7) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manage, Staff Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. Pl-rr: Send aMdress changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 302..30. * STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .............................................................. .Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuylndall Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Aistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Ridamdson Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Gete*, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .... ................................................................................... Linda [,ester Coming ................................................................. IX*wayne Flowers, Valinda Iv Legals ................................................................................................... .. Jaym Cranston Pre,woom Manager. ....................................................................... Wayne Pressroom .......................................................................... David Boggs, I.an'y Colleges Com, ogATt OmcxRs President ............................................................................................ .Millard B. Vice President .................................................................................. Citarlte S. Grimes Secretary .......................  ................................................................. .Lama Grimes Corer Treatsurer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Caimes Gant Legal Cotmsel and Assis "tant Secretary. ............................................. James S. Grimes Fondly Recalling My School A young woman was expelled from a Goldsboro, North Carolina, high school recently because she mod- eled a bathing suit in a shop- ping mall. A judge later ruled the student, seventeen-year-old Michelle Outlaw, could return to school, however, and justice certainly was served. High school kids are walk- ing around with green hair, so what's the big deal about modeling a bathing suit? Kathy Sue Loudermilk, hallowed be her name, entered a Miss Collard Festival beauty pageant back home one year and wore a bathing suit that was much too small to hold everything Kathy Sue had attempted to stuff into it. During the talent portion of the contest, Kathy Sue was doing her famous "Dueling Kazoos" number, and her suit gave way and split right down the front. Parents attempted to cover their children's eyes, and the Baptist minister had to be rexdved with cold water. Said my boyhood friend and idol, Weyman C. Wannamaker, Jr., a great American, who witnessed the incident, "What Kazoos!" I CAN'T imagine a stu- dent being expelled from school for simply modeling a swimsuit. Students were expelled from school back when I was in high school for sure, but you had to do some heavy-duty rotten stuff to get the gate. Weyman was expelled for one of the classics of teenage vandalism. He put cherry bombs down each of the three commodes in the boys' room and then flushed. By some method I'm not certain of, cherry bombs will explOde under water. Not only was the boys' room com- pletely flooded, but they found pieces of broken com- mode all the way down at the tether-ball pole on the play- ground. Weyman's father, Mr. Wannamaker, of Wannamaker Plumbing, gave the school a 10 percent dis- count on what he charged for cleaning up the mess. It was considered a fine gesture. FRANKIE GARFIELD, the School bully, usually was expelled once a week. Among other things, he once set fire to the school library in an effort to get out of having to read Les Miserables. The book was damaged, however. And rumor had it Frankie actually read four pages before his dog, Killer, at the book. Frankie also stole a pit and brought it to school in a sack. He set the pig free in the home ec. Lab where the students were learning to fry Three of the girls, the pig was bent on fainted. Frankie, got he pig fared even ate a sponge cake thel ec. Class had sick and died. Back to Kathy fared a lot better was she left of Kathy Sue's was placed on dis local feed store, sored the Miss Festival pageant. I guess we were more BY wrrH HIS HOME NEWS I El) COLUMNS BY THE GRIZTARD, BY MORELAND. A EDITING LAB TO HIS THEUNIVERSITY OF STILL AVAILABLE FOg THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, RO. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-12(16 Honesty Is Always a Good The story is told about a man who wrote to the Internal Revenue Service. In his let- ter he said, "I haven't been able to sleep for the past few weeks since I mailed in my tax form. Therefore, I am sending you $5,000 more in taxes. If I can't sleep after I send this, then I will send the other $5,000 1 owe you." There are people in our nation today who have drift- ed away from the values our country was founded on. They seem to think it is all right to better themselves financially at the expense of others. They think it's all right to not be totally honest and truthful with those with whom they deal. And yes, they think it is all right to be dishonest when paying their income taxes. Integrity is not longer a part of some folk's vocabu- lary. Webster says that integrity is "completeness, wholeness, honesty and sin- cerity." We need more men and women in this country today with integrity...com- plete, whole, honest and sin- cere people. In the business world, complete trust between employers and their associ- ates is the most important sin- gle ingredient. It is that way in the relationship with our friends as well. Donald Dunn tells a true story about an incident that occurred a while back with his father. It exemplifies the point I am trying to make today. A man entered my father's diesel repair shop, said he was a driver for a trucking company and sug- gested, "How about adding a few extra parts to the bill? We'll let the company pay for it, and you and I can split the difference." Dad refused, but the cus- tomer was insistent. "I come through here a lot," the matt continued. "We could make quite a bit of money."Dad said that wasn't how he operated. "Everyone does it!" the man yelled. "Are you some kind of a fool?" Burning mad, Dad asked the man to leave his shop. Suddenly the man smiled and extended his hand for a handshake. "I own a trucking company," he said. "I have been looking for a mechanic I can trust, and I've finally found one." So you see, honesty pays off and it is always a good rule to follow. Check over these other ten good rules I want to share with you today. You should not worry, for worry is the most unproduc- tive of all human activities. *You should not be fear- ful, for most of the things we fear never come to pass. You should not bridges before one them, for no one yet You should face problem as only handle way. You; lems to bed with you, *You should not other peoples' They than you can. *You should no relive for ill, it is Concentrate on what pening in your life happy now! *You should be a tener, when ten do you hard to learn when you are some people do than you do. *You should blessings, never the small ones, add up to one big one. 50 rs Ago... Hogans100v0000 pmaanmor to Um Hogans .Clarke Sing Sr. died after a lingering illness. He the son of the late Henry and Martha Singleterry, bom 1878 at Cooper Heights, =Mrs. be a winner of some as a result of an audience tk00pat00 = next Thursday. IE.W. Fleming, the city of LaGrange, attorney of Hogansville, tured the local Kiwanis here Tuesday on what termed, 'q'he ShameS Chambers County" He thatin( were bought for gallon of whiskey." A front depicted Mary and herpet00 ing that the two be old timers in hood." 'The Darling Brats' i ior class play was 'Howling revolved around the the Darling family, four being raised by an older and all of them had ests which confounded confusion and added to gayety..." *Mrs. W,L Martin duced a "delightful tasy which pleased the audience."