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Manchester, Georgia
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June 8, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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June 8, 2000
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A Gnme liun Millard B Gdm, Imfldent MIKE HALE PUBLISHFaADVERTISIN G DIRF&YFOR JOHN KALL ASSOCIATE ]:JBLISHERfEDITOR BRYAN GEmS AssocxA EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. x 426 Hogansville, Georgia 302,30 Encounter A Snake? Use Common Sense A week or so ago, while cut- ting my grass, I stumbled onto a pretty good-sized Timber rattler. I guess the sound of the lawn- !mower and the yell that I gave out was enough to scare the snake and he high-tailed it toward the : woods behind my home. Last week, The Talbotton New ! Era reported a snake being found :at the Courthouse in Talbotton. i The snake was captured and released back into the wild. While I don't have a love for :snakes, I'm not one of those peo- n. ple to run to get a gun and start- ! ing blasting away at it. Usually, a snake is just as afraid of you as : you are of it and will quickly take fits leave. However, if you intimi- : date it, you're asking for trouble. With the mild winter we enjoyed this past winter, and rain- fall low, we'll probably see more of the slithering creatures this summer. It is important to know how to deal with a snake and how to care for snakebite. The United States records between 7,000 and 8,000 snakebites annually. Most of those come during the summer season. It is important to remem- i ber that it usually takes several hours to die from snakebite and only about a dozen or so each year ! result in death. The first thing to remember about snakes is that they are try- ing to get away from you. If you allow them to do so, they will gen- erally move away and you won't see them again. If you don't that is when dealing with a snake can become dangerous. Use of good common sense can help prevent you from receiv- ing a bite. Here are a few point- ers: If you are walking or hiking in an area known to have snakes, wear long pants and boots if pos- sible; Do not thrush hands or feet into any areas if you cannot see into the area; Tap ahead of you with a walk- ing stick before entering an area with an obscured view of your feet. Snakes will attempt to avoid you if given adequate warning; Last, but most important, even though most snakes are not poisonous, avoid picking up or playing with any snake unless you have been properly trained to do so. If you are bitten, the first . thing you should do is call for emergency help. Here are a few don'ts involved with snakebites: Do not allow a snake bite victim to exercise by walking, etc. If possible, carry the victim to safety; Do not apply a tourniquet; Do not apply cold com- presses to snakebite; Do not give the victim stim- ulants or pain medication unless instructed by a doctor to do so; Do not raise the site of the bite above the victim's heart; Do not give the victim any- thing by mouth; Do not try to suction the venom- doing so may cause more harm than good. Here are a few first aid tips for dealing with snakebites: Keep the victim calm, restrict movement, and keep the affected area below the heart level to reduce the flow of venom; Wash the bite with soap and water; Remove any rings or con- stricting items; the affected area may swell; If the area of the bite begins to swell and change color, the snake was probably poisonous; Cover the bite with a clean, cool compress or a clean, moist dressing to reduce swelling and discomfort; Monitor the vital signs of the victim. If there are signs of shock lay the victim flat, raise the feet about a foot, and cover the victim with a blanket; Get medical help immedi- ately; Bring the dead snake, ff this can be done without risk of fur- ther injury to anyone else. OF COURSE, these are sim- ple CPR procedures and should not be considered as life saving techniques for snakebites Just remember, snakes will most likely be plentiful this year, so be careful and watch where you are putting your hands and feet. We welcome your ideas... THE HtmAmvn HOM NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 318 ! 6. USPS 6204M0. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hosamvilie, Georgia 30230. FOR  call (706) 846-3188 or .write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. : Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan G-eter Business Manager ........................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Staff Writers .........................  Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith. Lauren King Legals ................................................... ; ............................................................. Valinda lvery Receptionist and Classifieds ........... : .................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager .........................................................................  ............... Roland Foiles Pressroom .............................................. . .................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski CoaroaAr Oncegs President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Sectary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes GarreU Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ..................................................... James S. Grimes OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JUNE 8, 2000 Braving Breakfi00st oj'Death My friend Rigsby, the health nut, had that look in his eye. "I did it," he said. "Did what?" I asked him. "I had breakfast." "So did I," I said. "What's the big deal?" "I had a real breakfast," Rigsby answered. "For ten years all I've had for breakfast are things that are supposed to be good for me." "I've eaten enough oat bran to qualify for the Kentucky Derby. I've eaten more yogurt than a hun- dred-and-twelve-year-old Russian. I"ve eaten so many bananas on my grandola, I'm growing hair on my back and twice a day have a serious urge to go hang upside down on a tree limb." "But breakfast is our most important meal," I said. "You should be eating healthy in the morning." "I don't care," said Rigsby. "Man can't Live on fiber alone. He must also have an occasional scrambled egg." "You ate an egg?"I asked him in disbeLief. "Four," Rigsby answered. I don't remember the last time I had an egg. I think it was dur- ing the Eisenhower administra- tion. "Aren't you afraid of getting too much cholesterol?" I asked Rigsby. "I',e got to die of something, and if an egg doesn't get me, some- thing else will." "What else did you have?" "A Belgian waffle," said Rigsby. "With butter and syrup all over it." "That's a lot of sugar. What about hypoglycemia?" "What about it?" "Well," I attempted to explain, "you could become faint, disori- ented, and develop diabetes." "Yeah," said Rigsby. "I could also get run over by a beer truck, but I'm still going to cross the street." "Did you eat anything else?" "I had some bacon." "Bacon, studies show, can cause cancer." "And I ate some white toast." "No nutritional value there You should have eaten whole wheat." "And some pancakes." "On top of the Belgian waffle? Are your affairs in order?" "And some hash brown pota- toes." "All that grease. Who's the executor of your will?" "And three chocolate dough- nuts." "I don't remem- ber the last time I had an egg. I think it was dur- ing the Eisen- hower adminis- tratiog " "You won't live until Christmas." "And some leftover pizza from the night before." "Our Father, who are..." "And a Little Debbie Snack Cake." "But I drink diet soft drinks, to cut down on my s6gar intake," I said. "Yeah," my blood said. "You and all those dead laboratory rats." Just then my in the conversation. "Since eating cancer, when an I going some more fish?" ach. I'm afraid to eat fish,"I sak vision saying to be eating fish because the ment wasn,t doing inspecting it and I could tis." "Big deal. You want cancer?" my stomach ask After that, I sions. sort of coffee anymore, cereals made ouly of oat cut out all sugars-both artificial - I'd call in ernment inspectors to any fish I was about to eat, would never, under stances, get Ul could cause me to have attack. (If my house catches at midnight, I'll cross when I come to it.) Then I thought, what if: that and radon gas house and kills me? I went to the pulled out had myself a good cry. Warm Springs Expense A.cc (Another in a series) An example of the relaxed and friendly relationship of President and press then, and of their mutu- al affection for Warm Springs, is this exchange of poems. In 1943, the press association reporters heard a rumor that a long trip somewhere was in the offing. Alluding to a favorite Roosevelt topic for sniping at them -- their inflated Warm Springs expense accounts -- the corre- spondents typed up this: Ode to the Spring or Expense Account, Oh;How I Miss You As we wish for sectors vernal warm aike hope) Springs eter- nal. There we'd bask in liquidplea- sure While piling up a modest trea- sure. The problem's simple, answer s Let's jump to Georgia once again. Roosevelt was handed the poem by Marvin McInWre. He got a piece of scratch paper from Grace Tully and dashed off a reply: Your touching deep desire Arouses in me fire To send a hasty wire To Warm Springs in the mire To scape the roads Break out the corn The gals is waiting Sho's you born To the 3 Press Associations ONLY None others need apply. That year and again in 1944, the White House Correspondents Association personally gave Roosevelt a $1,000 check for the fight against infantile paralysis. The money was raised through the association's annual dinners. IN ACCEPTING the 1944 check at a regular White House press briefing (Roosevelt met with reporters twice a week through- out his administration), the President engaged in some brief banter, then turned serious. "That's perfectly grand," he said, "perfectly fine. Well, the dinner -- the dinner was certainly worth it. It was all right." He seemed genuinely moved. HAD THERE NOT been such Memories differ on whether agents would actually interfere. a good relationship, perhaps there would have been occasional pic- tures of Roosevelt in an aide's arms, or crawling, or struggling in or out of a car, or wobbling on braces and crutches. Perhaps there would have been word description of his problems. And perhaps not. Steve Early had a set speech for newcomers. "Why write about it (or photograph him)?" he would ask. "What's the point? Everybody knows he's crip- pled. It's just' not news." Even journalists who did not like Roosevelt would probably agree with that. If they didn't, there: always the Secret noted above, memories whether agents would interfere. Secret dealing with still restricted. A request to the Library ing with Secret Service tions or memoranda photographers brought response that orders or memos. So if there were agents, the viduals acting on their the "unwritten rule" for ists was also an unwritten agents. (Next week: Secret Service) 'THE SQUIRE OF WARM SPRINGS IS ON TLE WHITE HOUSE. IT TAINS ALL OF THE REPRINTED IN PER DURING THE PAST' PROCEEDS SALE ALL GO TO THI SEVELT CENTEIL Just Over in the (00loryla In 1906, James W. Acuff and Emmett S. Dean put together the old favorite, "Just Over in the Gloryland." This song has long been the favorite of many Christians because it speaks of their blessed hope, the coming of the lord Jesus, alld their home in heaven. Once Jesus comes and the church is removed, while the seven years tribulation is unfold- ing in the Earth, the saints will be at home in Heaven. The first phrase of each of the four verses of that old song gives a good description about the child of God's hope of Heaven. The phrases say, "I've a home where the saints abide, I am on my way to those mansions fair, what a joy- ful tho't my lord I'll see, with the blood washed throng I will shout and sing." While the Earthis expe- riencing the wrath of God, those saved by the grace of Go d will be busy with other things. WHILE REVELATION chap- ters four and five describe the scene of the saints in Heaven, there are two other events that we must concern ourselves with. These two events are the Judgement seat of Christ and the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. Both of these times include only those who have by faith received Jesus as their Savior. Once the church is raptured, (caught away) all will stand before the Judgement Seat of Christ. This judgement is not to deter- mine whether one is saved or lost, but to determine rewards. Contrary to the belief of many, the Bible teaches that one can know now where he will spend eternity. (I John 5:13) This judge- ment is presided over by the lord Jesus Christ where he will put to test the quality of every work of every believer. If the work withstands the test, then a reward will be given, if the work does not survive the test, then a loss will be suffered. (I Corinthians 3:12-15 and 2 Corinthians 5:10) WHILE LIVING in this world below, every child of God must realize that one day an account will be given. Every preacher will account for every sermon preached, every teacher will account for every lesson given, every singer will account for every song sung, and every church member will account for every service rendered for the cause of Christ. Although God does reward faithful service, there will also be loss for service of the wrong qual- ity. According to the Bible, rewards will be in the form of crowns for different areas of ser- vice. There will be the incorrupt- ible crown (I Corinthians 9:25-27), the crown of life (James 1:2, Revelation 2:10), the crown of righteousness (2 Timothy 4:8), the crown of glory (I Peter 5:2-4) and the crown of rejoicing (I 9j Thessalonians the judgement seat of loss while for others a time of reward. The crowns will be ful, but even more than hag the erowas will be when the saints will the feet of Jesus. Rev. 4:1( "The four and down before him that sat throne, and worship liveth for ever and ever, their crowns before the saying," When the day comes to 1 Jesus' feet our. gifts will we have to lay at scarred feet?