"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
June 13, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 13, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVnJ.v. HOME NEWS - J13, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-04O Jk (6rimes llublicatimt MIIII B.  Ilmialmt Mine HALE PUBI JSHFR/ADVERTIS IN G DIRECTOR JOHN KUYKI,4DALL ASSOCIATE PUBIJSI IER/EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSIbI'ANT EI)ITOR JAYN; GOIJXIX)N BUSINES, MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 I togansville, Georgm 31}2,30 Davis: A Good Man, Player, Politician While reading my Columbus Ledger-Enquirer last week, a stow about Glenn Davis entering the political arena caught my eye. Since Davis is one of my all time favorite baseball players, and people, I just had to stop and read the stow. While the stow contained a lot of infor- mation about Davis, it did not reflect some of his finer qual- ities. The story pointed out that Davis spent most of his career with the Houston Astros, that he was a two time All-Star player (1986 & 1989) and that he was founder of Carpenter's Way Ranch, a home for troubled boys which is located in southern Harris County. Davis, now 41, is origi- nally from Jacksonville, Florida. He's lived in Columbus since 1981. Davis fell in love with Columbus and the surrounding areas when he was playing semi- pro ball with the Columbus Astros. That is where I got to know him. , It was during that time that I was coaching Little League baseball in Harris County. Between taking my son, Brannon, and my teams to the ball park to watch the Astros play, I got to know a lot of the players. Davis impressed me, not only because he was so good with a baseball bat, but because it was easy to tell that he loved the game, the fans and all people. DAVIS WAS THE only player that was never too busy after the game to talk with the Little League play- ers and sign autographs for them. If I'm not mistaken, I still have his Columbus Astro card with his signature, a baseball he got all the Astros to sign for Brannon, and his signed pro card. All the Columbus Astro fans loved, Glenn. It didn't matter how many times he came to the plate in a game, he would receive a loud round of applause from the crowd. Although he was aheaw hit- ter, it was not just his talent at the plate that drew that applause, it was the way he treated the fans. When Davis was pulled up and left Columbus, there was never another player that could rouse the crowd the way he did. There was also never another player that treated the fans the way he did. MY FAVORITE stow about Davis came when my son was an 11 year-old play- hag with the Waverly Hall Cubs. When he and I were not on the field practicing, we were either at the batting cage or at Team Sports Supply looking for baseball equipment. Brannon had one thing in common with Glenn, that love for the game. Before the season began that year, Brannon and I were spending a lot of time in the batting cage in Columbus. Like all kids, Brannon heard what I told him about batting, but he didn't listen to me that well. That is because I was Dad. You see, for something to make an impression on children, it has to come from someone of higher authority. It just happen so, that was 1989. There we were at the cage hitting baseballs. I was doing my usual talking about closing the stance, short steps, head on the 00asam, good level swing, turn with the hips to drive the ball, etc. Brannon was doing his usual thing, not listening. AS I'M TALKING, a voice comes out of nowhere say- hag, "He's telling you like it is. if you want to drive the baseball, you have to explode with the hips." The man opened the batting cage, walked in with Brannon, and started to show him how it was done. "I'm getting ready for the season myself," he told Brannon. "Who.are you," Brannon asked. Atthe 1989All-Star Major League All-Star game got underway, Brannon was cheering for Davis. By the way, Brannon opened that season with two homeruns in the first game. Davis has shown over and over how much he loves peo- ple and this area. Probably the two greatest qualities needed for a local politician. By loving people and the place you live, it give a politi- cian an added incentive to vote for the things that are in the best interest of the peo- ple. Of course, I'm not endors- ing Davis for office, because the newspaper will not allow usto. Tile HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Rtxvelt tlighway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Geocgia 30230. FOR slJlRilqlo call (706) 846-3188 or v, Tite tO Circulathm Manager. S'tar Mercury Publ, P. O. Box 426, Manclxter, Georgia 31816. IIM./IIZli: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogan., ille. GA .Wf230. STnr Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... _lobn Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayue Goldston Assistant tor ...................................................................................... Rob Rich'm Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy BDant Agsistam Advertising Manager ................................................................. laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ......................................... . .............................................. Lim]a Les" Composing ................................................................. Dewayne Flowers, Valinda lvery Circulation Manager .................................................................................... Judy Crews Legals ....................................................................................... ............... ]ayne Goldston Pressroom Manager ........................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressroom ............................ . ......... David Boggs, Larry Colleges; Shannon Atkin Com,oRn President ............................................................................................. Millm'd B. Grin Vice President. ................................................................................. Charlolte S. Grimes Secretary ........... . .............................................................................. Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................. .. ....... Kathy Grimes Camett Legal Counsel and Assistant Seorem .............. . ................................ James S. Grimes Teens Discover a New A lady, obviously dis- traught, wrote me a letter recently asking that I "write something about all these teenagers sitting on the hoods of their cars at the shopping mall. "They just sit there at night and play their ear radios loud when they should be home," the lady continued. The lady's name isn't important here. She was writ- ing from Tampa, Florida, but that's not important here. What is important is that I do, in fact, write something about teenagers sitting on the hoods of their cars at shop- ping malls, which occurs, I suppose, all over the country. I think it's a great idea, and I don't know why my gen- eration didn't think of it. What we did when I was a teenager was drive around the Dairy Queen. I don't mean we drove around the Dairy Queen once and then drove somewhere else. I mean we drove around and around and around the Dairy Queen, and I'm still not sure why. It wasn't to locate any of our friends so we could con- verse with them. They were driving around and around and around the Dairy Queen, tOO. IT SEEMS THAT once during all those years, some- body weould have had the good sense to ask, "Hey, guys. What are we doing driving aroudn the Dairy Queen? I'm getting nauseous." But nobody ever said that, so here we would go, burning up no telling how many gal- lons of gasoline. During the oil crunch of the 70s. I thought of all the gasoline we wasted as teenagers driving around the Dairy Queen and figured we probably were the ones who at least started the ball rolling toward an oil crisis. Teenagers are going to hang out somewhere. In bib- lical days, they probably hung out over where the goats were being watered. The problem there was all the flies. In the Old West, they hung out over at the livery stable. Me, I hate liver, but I didn't grow up in the Old West. OUR PARENTS hung out down at the comer store eat- ing penny candy on their six- mile walk home from school. I say, let today's teenagers hang out sitting on the hoods of their ears at shop- ping malls if they want to. Think of the precious gasoline that is be'mg pre- served, and as long as teenagers are sitting on the hoods of their cars, they aren't going to be out terror- izing the roads and highways. It is to terrorize on a highway while sitting hood of your car at a ping mall. I do admit young have a to the sound on as far as it will go. What I do when I fronted by a playing loud her car radio is drive as away from them as I cat Which is what the who wrote from should let the kids en so they won't grow up old goats like her. BY SPECIAL WiTH HIS HOME NEWS ED COLUMNS BY MORELAND. A WRITING EDmNG LAB IS BEING TO HIS MEMORY THEIVERSITY OF STILL AVAILABLE FOR THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1216 We Must Scratch a Little The economy has been in somewhat of a slump over the past year or so and in some ways we can blame ourselves for that happening. B.C. Forbes put it pretty well when he penned the following. When the worms are scarce, what does a hen do? Does she stop scratching? She does not. She scratches all the harder. A lot of business people have been showing less sense than a hen since orders be scarce. They have laid off sales people; they have stopped or reduced advertising; they have sim- ply resigned themselves to inaction and, of course, to pes- simism. If a hen knows enough to scratch all the harder when the worms are scarc e , sure- ly business people ought to have gumption enough to scratch all the harder for business. Lou Holtz once said that the person who complains about the way the ball bounces is likely the one who dropped it. Some of us busi- ness folks have probably dropped the ball over the past year, but not the following person I want to tell you about. He was fired from three successive jobs, but had no doubt he would one day be successful. He received only a mea- ger rural education in his hometown in Nova Scotia, Canada, but he was deter- mined to make it in the sales world. After a year of selling brushes, he quit and set up his own shop. With a total investment of $375.00, he established his own brush company. From the start he ran his company according to three basic rules: Make it work, make it last and guarantee it. Within a month he had 260 salespeople, each of whom had paid $17.00 for the priv- liege of selling his brushes. Within a decade his com- pany's revenue had ballooned to $15 million, a fortune in 1916. By believing in himself and insisting on the best, Alfred Fuller created the leg- endary Fuller Brush Man, one of our country's first door-to- door salesmen. Fuller was a winner who had his sales people "scratch" harder for business when things slowed down. I would bet he also instilled the following win- ning traits in 1 A winner says, find out." A loser "Nobody knows." ,When a mistake, he "I wrong." When a a mistake, he says, "It my fault." A winner problem. A loser it, and never gets past it A winner makes mitments. A loser promises. A winner says,"i'ha i but not as be." A loser says, "I'm bad as a lot of other A winner tries to from those who are A loser tries to tear *A winner says, ought to be it." A loser says, "That'S way it's always ner in whatever you do, scratch a tittle business slows down. 50Years Ago IIIM Inthe Hogansville  to the ne  l.t Gladney, husband and fall'mr, year-old Rosalie Kent both their lives to R.L. 3, Hogansville. A week ago Sunday Louise Kent, his eight children and his son-in-law klg the day at New all of a sudden "1 dove in alter thorn," said, "but couldn't do with my clothes on so I come back out and take off. Then I went in again I saw Rosie's hair close to surface of the water, and her ouL" .Graham famous Negro concert play in Grantvilie, Georgia efit of the Luthefsville Church Building Fund. His gram has been indude classical, religious, and some particular appeal to Admission will be $1.25 adults "Ttm greatest sale in more than 20 sibly the greatest has ever seen." That's the/re calling clarion sale of the chandise .... Breed restaurant, which the per said would be for tourists J others who commited thad fangled activW course, in quotation "Eating Out."