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Manchester, Georgia
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June 15, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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June 15, 2000
 

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THE HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O4O Mllard B. Gdm, Pmeident Mine I-IAI PUBUSHEMADVERTLSING DmFR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCmTE PUBLrror BRYAN GEIXR ASSOClAaX EDrroR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 It's Really Just About Attitude John Rocker has made the :trip to Ohio and is seeing life through the eyes of a minor lea- guer for a change. Poor Rocker, having to carry his own hags, rid- ing a bus and having to sleep at a Holiday Inn rather than a Hilton. It must be a tough life. If Rocker has done nothing else, maybe he has impressed upon our Little Leaguers what attitude is all about. Rocker had 38 saves last sea- son, one shy of a team record. His teammates and the fans are unpressed with his ability to pitch. However, he has been referred to bY his teammates as a cancer in the clubhouse. In other words, he has an attitude prob- lem. One of the Braves said Rocker wants to do good things and when he doesn't he gets mad. AS A COACH for Harris County Youth Sports for many years, one thing I tried to impress upon my players was attitude has as much to dg-WR_5 3vinning as good, sotmd fundamentals. Those teams won their fair share of games. They knew the rules, if you didn't act right.., you rode the pine. Most often, professional play- ers forget they are men playing a child's game. It is suppose to be fun. Of course, you want to win and you want to be the best at what you do, but you must keep your attitude in check. Rocker is a good pitcher. Lately, he has experienced some problems with his control. Most likely the problem is stemming from the stress involved with the media and the boos of the fans. Rocker is a fan favorite in many ways. Unlike many play- ers, he is willing to sign auto- graphs. It's unclear to me if he likes the fans or ff he likes doing these things because it feeds his ego. AS FAR as his comments are concerned, he probably should- them publicly. However, any man that says he is not prejudice to some degree probably is not telling the truth. While most people feel being prejudice means feeling you are superior of another race, that is not true. Some men are prejudice to women simply because they feel they are superior to them. There are many ways some- one can be prejudice without race entering into it at all How many times have you heard someone referred to as %vhite trash?" THE DECISION by the Braves to send Rocker back to Triple A ball probably bad more to do with his attitude than his pitching skills. A story in the Atlanta Constitution Friday stated Rocker showed "frustration" dur- ing warm-ups his first day with the Triple A club. The Braves are certainly hop- ing Rocker will be a changed man if and when he returns to Atlanta. They would like to see his pitch- ing skills improve and his atti- tude as well. Unfortunately, Rocker will probably be the same man if he returns to Atlanta. He will always rather get three strikeouts than three groundouts to feed his ego. WOULDN'T it be nice for a change to find a professional ath- lete that cared more about the image he projects than padding his statistics? In other words, a true role model. Trig HopsvnL HOME NEWs is published weekly by the Star-Memury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansviil, Geoa 30230. FOR stscmFrloNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georg/a 31816. : Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAr Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................ . ....................... M Hale Associa Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykcndall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Gem" Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayne Gokiston Stdf Wrims ......................... Deborah Smith, Caroline Yeager, Lee Howell, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .............................................................................................. Linda Lester Photography .............................................................................................. Michael C. Snider Composing ..................................................... Valinda lvery, Deborah Smith, Laurcn King Legals ................................................................................................................. Valinda Ivefy Rex:eponist and Ctassifieds .............................................................................. Clefs Young Production Manager ........................................................................................ .Roland Foiles Pr,sroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Cm)chowsld CORPORATE Ornozes President .................................................................................................... Miilard B. Gfinw Vice President ........................................................................................ CharloO S. Grimes Secmu ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Crarr Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretory .................................................... James S. Grimes OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JUNE 15, 2000 How Father's Day Began... This Sunday will be a special day- Father's Day! The first Father's Day was oberved in Spokane, Washington, in 1910. Sonora Louise Smart Dodd, of Washington, first proposed the idea of a "father's day" in 1909. She wanted a special day to honor her father, William Smart, who was widowed when when his wife died in childbirth with their sixth child. Mr. Smart was left to raise the newborn and his other five chil- dren by himself. Mrs. Dodd wanted Father's Day to be celebrated on the first Sunday in June, her father's birth- day. However, the Spokane coun- cil couldn't get the resolution through the first reading until the third Sunday in June. Over the next decade, cities across America began celebrat- ing a day for fathers and in 1924 President Calvin Coolidge sup- ported the idea of a national Father's Day. It wasn't until 1966 that President Lyndon Johnson signed a presidential proclamation declaring the third SundayofJune as Father's Day. In 1972, President Richard Nixon established a permanent national observance of Father's Day to be held on the third Sunday of June. This came almost sixty years after Mother's Day had been pro- claimed a National day of obser- vance. The white or red rose is the official flower for Father's Day. Mrs. Dodd suggested people wear a white rose'to honor a father who was deceased and a red rose for a father who was living. FATHER'S DAY is special to me. Even though my dad has been deceased since 1994, I still miss him very much. He was my friend and hero. When I needed a whipping, believe me, he knew how to use a hickory. When ! needed a hug, he knew how to put his arms around and squeeze real tight. He always joked, but it was just about the truth when he said "I carried you futher than you'd ever walked." We worked in the fields /l "He taught me right from wrong. He set the exam- ple for me to live by. 9 together--plowed corn, fertilized and hoed the garden. We milked the cows and slopped the hogs and wrung the chicken's necks togeth- er. He taught me right from wrong. He set the example for me to live by. 7  AFTER THE WORK was done, he didn't go to the "beer joint" or out with the "boys" but got his fishing pole and we: ed to the creek or lake. During always cut a load of Saturday afternoons course, we would take gles and shotguns to do a ' hunting so we could favorite dish, rabbit, on the Mother and Daddy Christian values. We blessing before people say "who will grace." Really there is no ence in how, take time to thank the our food and blessings. By the way, Daddy and went to church with sure we behaved during the1 ship hour. He wasn't much in church, but as I older and God called me and I became his knew when Daddy the doors for I could I'll never forget loved my my myself and his Hopefully one day we can J together in Heaven. A Problem for the Secret Service (Another in a series) There is a filmstrip in the Roosevelt Library that shows the President walking with difficulty and awkwardness. The movie was taken by an amateur photograph- er as RooseveR entered a recep- t.ion at Vassar College in August 1933. An unidentified man, pre- sumably a Secret Service agent, suddenly walks between the cam- eraman and the President. ..... A Maryland movie hobbyist has told the author that in 1938 he tried to take a movie of President Roosevelt as he was getting out of the car to ascend some stairs to an outdoor speaking platform. A Secret Service agent cupped his hand over the movie camera lens and kept it there till the President was in place to speak, the Maryland man said. It should be said that Roosevelt's nearly useless legs posed a special problem for the Secret Service. He could not jump hack, crouch or duck from a stand- ing position. He was an especial- ly vulnerable target for an assas- sin. The agents on the White House detail knew this. They also knew that Roosevelt had been shot at after he was elected but before he had taken office. BOTH THE ABOVE incidents dealing with movie cameras, and others like them, could be explained by agents, wariness of unfamiliar persons pointing gad- gets at the President. In this regard, the Secret Service procedure in the event of a suspected assassination attempt was to shove the President down. The other big fear of the Secret Service, and the big fear of Roosevelt, himself, was fire. The White House of the 1930s and early 1940s was viewed by the Secret Service as "the biggest firetrap in America," in Mike ReiUy's words. In the event of fire anywhere in the White House, the plan called for two agents to go immediately to the room the President was in, enter without knocking and carry him out of the building. Two can- vas fire chutes were carried by the Secret Service wherever Roosevelt traveled. A THREATENING crowd sit- uation occurred once. That was in the 1940 campaign when Roosevelt came into the New York metropolitan area. Jersey City Mayor Frank CI Am the Law") Hague, the Democratic leader of the state of New Jersey, had sent out 30,000 invitations to meet the President when he got off of the i ill Roosevelt's nearly use/ess/egs posed a special problem for the Secret Sender. train in Newark to be wheeled to a waiting car. The station was so jammed that an alarmed ReiUy asked the local police inspector if he could- n clear people out. The reply was that Hague's invitation took the matter out of the police's hands. The people in the back who could- n't see were pushing and shoving in the sman station. "The President could get killed," Reilly said. He had agents surround the wheelchair, ordered the hand- leader to play the national anthem, and rushed the President to a small office dttring the respectful pause. the crowd was still a threat l the entourage got away station area. It devise a number of unique facts because the President United States could in a normal way. Ramps speaking engagements for and speaking working with the agent in E.W. Starling. One stand with the President, the ahead to be set Ul; And during World White House wheelchairs fall.) 'THE SQUIRE OF OF WARM SPRINGS IS ON ATTHEGIFF TIE WHITE HOUSE. IT TAINS ALL OF THE SALE ALL GO TO TI-I SEVELT CENTER. Winning the Battle for the In our modem day America, there is a battle raging, that if lost, will change our nation in a way that we do not want to see. The battle referred to is the hat- tle for the family. There are those who identify it as the traditional family, while still others refer to it as old fashioned. The best term to describe the family that is under attack is the biblical fami- ly. As we look around, the family that is described in the Bible is being attacked with all kinds of hellish missiles. For those fami- lies who are scripturally put together, Satan had launched the missile of divorce. For those who have yet to begin their own faro- fly, we can see the missile of devi- ation. In order to keep us from forming biblically based families, Satan tries to entice folks to devi- ate from the Word of God. One way people deviate from the Bible is living together out of wedlock. GOd established the family by the marriage union and it is only in that union there can be a right and proper family. Still another way Satan has drawn people away from the biblical concept of mar- riage is the homosexual relation- ship. God created a man and a woman to form the family. Before someone labels me a homophobe or a hatemonger, let me go on record by saying this. Just because a man stands against sin, whether it be the sin of homosexuality, adultery, gam- bling or whatever, it doesn't mean that that man has hatred in his heart for the person involved. "God created a man and a woman to form the family." Although there are some with such attitudes, there are those who truly care for the people involved in those Satan perpe- trated lies. It is true you can hate the sin and love the person. If one would closely examine the Bible, this fact can easily be seen. John 3:16 says, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begot- ten son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Romans 5:8 says, "But GOd commendeth his love toward us in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." The point is there is a battle for the family. AS WE LOOK around and see all the violence of children and young people, there are those who wonder why and what can be done. It is my opinion that the vio- lence and delinquency of a symptom revealing th( down of the biblically family. May this pastor that if we are to see a among our nation's the fight for the won. The first way tle is to stren that are already Father's Day there be a revival of GOd has placed man as the of the home and in the the family, the his rightful place. The living leader of his home. to take the responsibility that his family ctro of, itually. As a result of the taking his responsibility, end way to win family will automatically into play. It is the of the parents, fathers, to see to it their are educated in the truths  Bible. ITHANK( derful families beautiful little town. But, families are under today may all the fathers up to the challenge and their wives and childrerb the future we can see oaf turn back to God.