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Manchester, Georgia
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June 17, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
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June 17, 1999
 

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THE HOGANSVILLE HERALD o tfime ublicali Millard B. Grimes, Prmddeflt USPS 620-O4O MIKE HALE PUBIJSHER/ADING DIRECTOR JOHN KArL AS3CTATE PUBIJSHER/EDITOR MARION (TED) SMrm INAGING EDrIDRCAL DIRECIR WUEgr BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogae, cor 3oz3o Official I.'gal O.on. CiO' of Hogansvilk" H.B. 489 For most of our history no one has looked very carefully at the services delivered to cit- izens by local governments. 1hxpayers who lived in the cities paid their city taxes and their county taxes also and no one paid much attention to what they were getting for this dou- ble taxation. Year before last the Georgia legislature decided that each county and the cities within that county needed to sit down and examine what services are pro- vided by each one. They are not to just look at them. They are to make adjust- ments according to what serv- ice is being delivered by whom. The basic services to be exam- ined include fire protection, police protection, road mainte- nance, water and sewer servic- es, recreation, zoning, code enforcement, building inspec- tion and similar items. House Bill 489 set out to accomplish several things. One is to change the situation where a taxpayer is paying both the city and the county for a serv- ice but is only getting that serv- ice delivered by one of them. Another is to prevent the dupli- cation of services by both the county and the city.--Another is to provide a plan for the future delivery of services. In order to accomplish these goals House Bill 489 requires the county commissioners and the city council members sit down together. They have to determine which local government is going to deliver which service to which taxpayers, what area will be covered, what it will cost, and where the money will come from. All these understandings have to be included in a docu- ment called the Service Delivery Strategy (SDS). This SDS document for Meriwether has to be approved by the coun- ty commissioners, by the mayor and council of Greenville (as county seat), and by the mayor and council of two of our four cities with population over 500 (Greenville, Luthersville, Manchester, and Woodbury). Finally, this document must be approved by the Department of Community Affairs. These requirements have been in place for over a year now and should be adopted by the deadline of July 1, 1999, The legislature decided to put some teeth into House Bill 489. The penalty for failing to have the SDS adopted on time is the loss of state funding, state permits, state grants, and so on. In short, any county failing to adopt a SDS is crippled. This is not optional. We have to do this whether we like it or Tyron Elliott not. The 1999 legislature did give counties a chance to opt for a 120-day extension if the July 1, 1999 deadline was not met. Meriwether County has had to ask for the extension. Counties and cities all over the state are doing the same. Very few counties have their plans in on time. With one year to get ready it might be puzzling to wonder why this is taking so long. An examination of the impact of any SDS plan done the way it should be shows, how- ever, why the county govern- ments just wish this would go away. In the coming weeks this col- umn will examine some of the issues involved in the various services covered by HB 489 and how they have been treated by the various proposals for the SDS plan to be adopted here. The county recently pre- pared a proposed plan.The plan has been approved by Greenville and Luthersville. Manchester and Woodbury, in a remarkable show of unity, have common serious reserva- tions about the proposal. The county could pass a plan without the approval of Manchester and Woodbury but it might not pass muster at the Department of Community Affairs so discussions are underway. (First in a series.) THE HOGANSVILLE HERALD is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-O40. Subscription rates by mail: $15 in Meriwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansvil]e, Georgia 30230. FOR SUBSCRWTmNS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury. Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. PCa-MA.S'InR: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansvi]]e, Georgia 30230. STJF Publisher and Advertising Director .......................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ..................................................... John Kuykendall Managing Editor and Technical Director ................ . ............... Marion fred) Smith Business Manager ............................................................................. LeeAnn W'dbert .sociate Editors .............. Billy Bryantfralbotton, Michael Snider/Harris County Dan Stout/Hogansvil]e, Caroline Yeager/Greenvil]e Advertising Sales ............................................................. Laurie Lewis, Linch l.ester Photography ......................................................................................... Michael Snider Features ...................................................................................................... Lani A. Pike Composing .................................................................... Valinda Ivery, Melissa Pierce Legals ....................................................................................................... Valinda Ivery Receptionist and Classifieds .................................................................... Cleta Young Pressroom .............................................................. David Boggs, Wayne Grochowski COnPORATF. OFnCERS President ............................................................................................... Millatd Grimes Vice President ............................................................................... Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ....................................................................................... Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .......................................... James S. Grimes OPINION PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - JUNE 17, 1999 If I Can't Be a Hammer, Let Me Be a "If God can't find a hammer el, hard to forget. I thanked him He'll use a shoe to drive His cos- for the complimenet and a lit- mic nail," one of my most spiri- tle later he asked me to dance. tually-lead friends says, the While we were dancing, he said, point being, He gets the job "You don't remember me, do done. you.. 2" I like that analogy. It makes "No," I replied. a lot of sense. Some of us are "You used to work in the hammers. Some of us are shoes, courthouse, in the DA's office," ...... Lorirl . Sinn- Clark : Columnist They are kids are doing all right. "I would have brought with me tonight, but she tired from working all day told me to go on Tomorrow is Saturday, that usually her night." they nice place to live, he said, The point is, the work gets done. And, sometimes, if we are truly blessed, He reminds us of that. . .The other night I was blessed with just such a reminder, while I was (of all things) listening to a Zydego band. Feeling like a worn-out shoe that night (rather than a hammer), I thought the music might cheer me up. I got a drink and listened for awhile; but, I was only pretend- ing to have a good time. The music was hot, but my spirits were not. So I headed outside for some fresh air. On my way a dark, bearded, Cajun-looking man, dressed as if he were "in the trades" stopped me. He said he reads my column every week and loves it every time. "On Mother's Day I called my mother-collect-just because of you and that piece you wrote," he said. "She's in Louisiana and was glad to get the call." His accent was thick and so Louisiana-sounding, I had a hard time understanding him. He sounded almost foreign-unusu- he said. "Yes," I said, wondering if I was beginning to smell a rat. For awhile I had done the Victims' Assistance Program, which involved dealing with people who weren't in the best times of their lives. I hoped this man wasn't a defendant I'd been harsh with during a family violence case. I hoped he wasn't about to seek revenge, blaming me for trash- ing his life... Then it hit me--the accent! I had dealt wit him and his wife- and it was a family violence case. I remembered that they both seemed young and scared, having just moved from Louisiana with two small kids. They were renting. She did- n't work. He was looking for a job. They were out of money and the wolves were howling at their door. I don't remember if there was drink involved, but she got hit. He got arrested, and a few days later they ended up talking with me because that was my job back then. Something in their story, told in those deep Louisiana accents, coupled with the way they looked at each other-clearly in love and filled with remorse, obviously having some real hard times-touched me. I remember fighting hard with my boss the DA for some lenience with this couple-I did- n't want him to go to jail or have to pay. (One of the reasons I left the DA's Office was, as the lawyers were fond of telling me, I got 'oo involved," but for that cou- ple, I was glad I did.) Shortly after dealing with them I chanl[ed jobs and never heard what happened to them. I thought of them occasionally and hoped their story was one of the few that actually turned out all right. And, now, here he was-that young wife's beloved, troubled man-dancing with me. I asked him how it was going; and, he told me that it had turned out okay. The counseling helped, he said. "I still go every week!" "the money, well, it comes The best part about it way you could see it in his when still in love," he told me. I look at her my bones melt!' He said he wanted to me for the role I'd ing that troubled time. helped give us a chance "You helped save us all And, you know what? I don't her no more. Not time. I broke the cycle, father hit my mother and brother hits his e. But boys, the a better life." We danced a while then he went home to his I had the impression they going to have a sweet, night. I left feeling like more successful from the Zydego music and I knowledge that I'd made a differnece in body' life. It'd be a nice to the er, but sometimes' also mighty fine just to be the shoe. FDR Discovers the Springs' Healing (Sixth in a series). Creek Indians discovered the healing properties in the warm mireral waters that gushed from the side of Pine Mountain in southwest Georgia. Their white supplanters found the waters and the mountain more suited to relaxation..than,, therapy. For nearly 100 years before' Franklin Roosevelt made his first visit to Warm Springs, the community had been a summer vacation resort. Its elevation (over 1,200 feet) and the thick pine forests that gave the mountain its name made for pleasant tempera- tures even in the dog days of deepest summer. A town grew up around the resort and was incorporated as Builochville in 1896 (named after Eleanor Roosevelt's father's mother's family). The hotel that Roosevelt would see (but never stay in) was the Meriwether Inn, built in 1889 to replace a hotel which had burned down. It was a three-story ram- bling green, yellow and white Victorian monstrosity, with eccontrm turrets and verandas. It had two tiny enclosed pools for men and women and an out- door pool 150 feet by 50 feet, large by the standards of the day. By the end of World War I, the resort had fallen on hard times. The owner, Charles Lamar Davis, seemed to have lost his grip on the enterprise. A newspaper editor from Columbus, Thomas W. Loyless, remembered the hotel at the turn of the century, and thought its grandeur could be restored. He leased the property from Davis, with an option to buy, in 1919 or 1920. He paid Davis $9,000 aye He was seldom able to fill the 46-room hotel and its 1S small cabins for the summer season. In a 1937 talk to patients at Warm Springs, Roosevelt put it this way: "The old place had fall- en on rather thin days and when I came down here in the fall of 1924, they had a very poor sea- son, and the man who ran the hotel -- well, he was in the red and most of his knives and forks had disappeared and most of the crockery had been broken." In 1923 Loyless met George . Foster Peabody who was also from Columbus. Loyless had gone to New York to augment his summer income from the hotel. He told Peabody about his efforts and about a young man who claimed to have been "cured" of polio by swimming in the waters at Warm Pine Mountain. Peabody expressed interest have swum his way bacg in joining Loyless in the enter- The health. prise. He had Loyless ask the Roosevelt questioned young man, Louis Joseph, to Squ|re closely about his lameness write a letter to Roosevelt, Of Warm progress, his exercises describing his experiences, much he attributed his Peabody conveyed the letter to SDlng$ to Warm Springs. Joseph's Roosevelt, invited him down to By Theo . cess was what the resort. . .... :b  - n,,nr alwayshopedŁorhimsetŁ He gave Loyless money,to . Upl.. al=T Joseph could paint the inn and spruce up the ........ assistance, and grounds a little, home, but he Roosevelt, Eleanor, Mar- one cane. guerte (Missy) LeHand, his per- of a robust man with legs "like After a chat with sonal secretary, and Irwin spaghetti." McDuffie, his valet, took a train His wheelchair was loaded valet to the down from New York, arriving in with the other baggage, and a private dressing room at Bullochville's small station off the party went to the Hart drapes of canvas in the on October 3. cottage, murmuring proper house. The "season" was over, but appreciative remarks about the Roosevelt may have a small staff remained at the clean air and handsome pines, with Joseph that mornin hotel, including Louis Joseph. ignoring the signs of rural did, either that day or the The pool was still open. southern poverty in the town and discussed the When the train arrived at and on the clay road to the resort effects with Joseph's doctoJ dusk, Tom Loyless was there to area, several hundred yards James Johnson of the greet Roosevelt. So was Miss away. textile town of Manchester. Georgia Wflkins, Davis's niece. The Roosevelts settled in at FDR's first dip, solo Theyhad a direct interest in the the Hart cottage. Years later, accompanied, was on visitor. Roosevelt's fame as a reminiscing about that first 4, 1923, and brought leading Democratic party night, FDR said he was kept mation that he had never leader attracted also the mayor, awake by tle sounds of squir- any water so pleasant. E.B. Doyle,.a farmer; the town's rels running across the roof. he was able to lift his one physician, Dr. Neal The next morning, he wait- the stronger one. Kitchens; the Columbus couple ed at the cottage for Louis Roosevelt could whose cottage Roosevelt would Joseph. Joseph was a 26-year- stay in, the Harts; and a num- old engineer who had been feet of water. Perhaps he ber of others, over 50in all. Most stricken in much the same fash- have done that in any water. were just curious, ion Roosevelt had in 1920. He the Warm Springs water Roosevelt was lifted from had been paralyzed from the have the Pullman platform by waist down. - double molecules of McDuffie and a young black When ke had recovered sium and calcium- that man Loyless had brought with enough to travel, he left his New a higher specific gravity him. The celebrity's braces had York home for his father's cot- most spring water. It been locked so that he could rage on Pine Mountain in 1921. according to the therapists' walk to the piatform from inside He stayed two years there and came there to work in the Pullman car. in Columbus. lowing years, the most Once aground, he walked on He spent a lot of time swim- freshwater they had crutches again to a waiting car. ruing in the warm waters. He encountered. One observer, Ruth Stevens, could not walk when he first (Next week: later recorded her impression came down, but he seemed to name change.) Summer Reading Club ChiUin' The accumulation ................................................................................... Ellison, Potomac fever snowflakes at Hogansville :,.. _. Henry Horrock, The right Public Library did not slow the uuraly news of evil by John Saul. activity at the CHILL OUT . to our large print WITH BOOKS Summer include: fiction - A cat Reading Club programs on own by Lydia Adamson, Thursday June 10. The Arctic Jane Cheatham Gottshall, by Joe Gores scene mural in the lobby has Branch Manager of night by accumulated ninety-seven Addition,, snowflakes. Each snowflake Bulfinch's Mythology displays the name of a child who , Thomas Bulfinch, has registered in the Summer assisted Ms. Powell in the craft haunts form the Reading Club. activity, foothills stories and Yvonne Bledsoe, our Youth Registrations for this year's (edited by) James V. Librarian, presented the story Summer Reading Club will be How is my first grader "Blood on the Ice" by Jim accepted through the end of school? by Jennifer Kjelgaard from Boys' Life June. Introduction to Treasury to the children aged Arctic and. Antarctic anf- Ronald Pearsall, The end 12andup. mals is the t0piat our next pro, dream by Ann Rule, Frankie Neighbors Wiggins gram on June 24. Jean Crocker, build your own delighted the forty-five chip retired teacher, presents the home by Ray G. Scott, dren attending the morning pri- PrimaryProgram foragesthree Shakespeare •the mary program, to seven at 10:30 a.m. works and American Trish Powell, a new member Additions to our adult col: ment by James Q. Wilson. to our library, demonstrated lection in[lude: fiction reference books include: how to make a snowman's face Dangerous kiss by Jackie fabulous century by the on a paper plate. Dana Austin Collins, Juneteenth by Ralph of Time-Life. t