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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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June 17, 2004     The Hogansville Herald
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June 17, 2004
 

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i Opinions Ideas PAGE 4-A - HOGANSVIIJ~ HOME NEWS - THURSDAY, JUNE 17, 2004 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62O-O4O JOHN K~DALL PUBIJSHER~DITOR I.~URm l.,m~s ADVERTISING D IRF/,-'q~R Ct~'T CLAYBROOK As,~c lATE EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR h B. Gctm~ I~lmt Phone (706) 846-3188 - Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hog~tnsville, GeoPgia 30230 ff I'm Remembered, i Let it be for Kindness " In the last two weeks I've been shocked by the death of two people that I knew pret- ty well. The first was Mike MeKay. Mike and I were i friends in high school and to i hear of his passing alarmed ,~ me some. It is hard to believe i that people of our age, late !i 40s, die from things like heart ! diseases. ; The other was Mr. Joe ! Durham. "Mr. Joe" as he was called by almost everyone, i was an inspiration to many. iI want to share with my readers a couple of things about beth of these men. Mike was always fun to : be around. He had a sharp wit and he could crack a joke at : any second. The last time I : spent any real time with Mike ' was during high school on a i trip to Atlanta. We had lots of i fun on that trip. We laughed, we talked about serious mat- leers (mostly about girls) and we became better friends. Somehow, over the years, ~ we just lost contact with each other and when I heard of his I guess he could see the pride in my eyes when I talked about Red. The point is, Mr. Joe and Mike were both good people. They really cared about oth- ers and were import_ant to so many lives. They both will be missed. After a while it dawned on me that both left goodtes- timonies behind. I Wish we all could be that fortunate. THE WORLD today is a busy place. We don't take time for friends and family much any more. It's allabout making money and continu- ing to survive. We sometimes lose sight of what is really important. I was reminded of that only a few weeks ago by my passing that Atlanta trip just !thatlongpopp ed into my mind. I five year-old grandson. We thought, "Man, has it been were talking on the phone and ?~' he said to me, '~wpaw, you ~n I h~ar-d~mt Mr never ~me byand play ~ercwererna0y mem- games with me any more. ories I have of him over the ~ years, and one that I will never forget. : I've always loved horses i and after my father passed away, horses seemed to help take my mind off his being ' gone. I had a couple of ponies, but decided I wanted a horse. :: In Harris County during that : time, if you wanted to know i something about a horse, you went to Mr. Joe. : I spokewithhimaboutmy : desire to have a horse. After ! we talked about it for a while, : he agreed to sell me a quar- ter horse. He was stud, had :~ spirit, but Mr. Joe felt I could handle him. I bought "Red" from Mr. IJoe and it was one of the greatest experiences in my ~lffe. That was one,smart horse. Even though he'~as a : stud, he learned quicklpand handled like a dream. \ The only problem wit~ Red was after a while, I wa~ : about the only person who : could ride him. He didnl like strangers on his back and would let them know it imme- diately. A COUPLE YEARS passed and Red and I bond- When are you going to come by?" In that brief moment I realized that while the busy adult Life is extremely impor- tant to me, and is my liveli- hood, there are more impor- tant things in life. Both Mike and Mr. Joe were easy-going people. They had an outlook on life that most of us have forgot- ten. That life is meant to be fun and cherished. So are family and friends. We should all strive to be like that. We should leave behind our own testimony when we part from this earth. The highest compliment to any man or woman should always be, "He (or she) was a good friend, cared about people, always ~tried to do what was right and always had time for a person that needed them."- I have tried in the past couple of years to be more like that. I hope that I have been. So, I guess what I'm try- ing to say in this column is something that I've heard the President and CEO of Grimes Publications, Inc. say more times that I can count: "We ed very wen. At that time, Mr." must be kind to each other." Joe was the supervisor at the R is important to treat others Harris CoUnty Bus Shop. I as you would like for them to : saw him often and he would treat you, but what is more i always ask me, "Boy, how's important is to let them know that horse of yours doin'?" that you care about them. THE HOGANSVlI~E HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR SUBSCCU, rlONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications. P. O~ Box 426. Manchester. CJeo~a 31816. ~: Send address changes to P, O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230. ST~F Publisher and Editor .......................................................................... John Kukyendall Advmising Director ................................................................................. Laurie Lewis ~tate Ed|tor ................................................................................... Chnt Claybrook Assistant Edite .......................................................................... : .......... Rob ~.hard_son StaffWritexs .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Composition .............................. Dewayne Flowers. Robert Weems. Gad Youngblood Circulation Manager ........................................................................... Tracy Lynn Wyatt Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Cnochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................................... Zaddie Dixon.Darnell McCauley Mailroom Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs COm, ORAT~ Orru~a~s President. ............................................................................................ Millard B. Grimes Vice President. ................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Executive V'~e President and Secretary. ...................................... &aura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Ganeu Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ....................................... :....,.James S. Grimes Stop One of the best health pro- grams I am aware of is the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and it's fight against smoking. Smoking was first linked to cancer some 40 years ago by the US Surgeon General, but recently reports have added smoking for causes of cancer on the stomach, kid- ney, pancreas, leukemia and several other diseases. Surgeon General Richard Carmona's latest report says that smoking damages near- ly every cell in the body. Makes you wonder why any- body smokes. The early surgeon gener- al's report in 1964 against smoking has led to a decline in smoking by mature adults. Recent reports show that 42.6 percent of adults smoked in 1966 and this percentage fig- ure had dropped to 22.5 per- cent in 2002. It appears that the less education adults have and nearer the poverty level one Before It Kills lives, the more likely one is to smoke. To make matters even worse, Medicare does not pay for cessation pro- grams in some states and pro- vides only limited care in oth- ers. When I was a child grow- ing up in rural Clarke County I began smoking at an early age. My father was a tobac- co salesman for a wholesale warehouse and also seemed to be a chain smoker. Most all of the adults I knew were smokers and women were just beginning to take up the habit. TOBACCO AND ciga- rettes were easily accessible for me and my brothers. At times we were caught smok- ing out behind the barn we were warned that we would set the barn on fire and smok- ing would "stunt your growth." By the time I was 15 years old I was already six feet tall, so I discounted this as an old wives tale. "This time I did- n't say I'd quit smoking, only I hadn't smoked one today.~ Although I never drank alcohol I continued to smoke until I was 37 years old. I tried to stop several years earlier in 1958 when my boss and a person I admired very died of lung pletely changed my life ! led to our Manchester. I tried to smoking, but could not. Finally on March 7, a log buying triI haven't smoked one This time I didn~ say I'd~ smoking, only I smoked one today. Even Mary didn't until a month later noticed our bed smell of nicotine As one who was hooked on nicotine let me: it wasn't easy, but has to be the best thing health in my life. My advice to is don't ever take that cigarette and you will have to experience drawal I did to quit To young adults I Ican( smoking before it kills Let's Beware the Evils of Gam J. E. Bedenbaugh related this stow. My grandmother, a staunch Southern Baptist, had marched me off to Sunday school and church regularly. So when I switched to the Episcopal church after marriage, she challenged me: "vVhat's wrong with the Baptist Church, son?" 'Well," I explained, "Carole and I flipped a coin to see if we would go to her church or mine, and I lost." "Serves you right," said my grandmother. "Good Baptists don't gamble." Every week folks flock into the local convenience stores to by lottery tickets :hopin~ to,win the great prize. The great prize being what seems to them to be the answer'to all their problems, a ear load of money. The buy- hag of lottew tickets isn't the only problem, but also just plain old fashioned gambling. Even in the south, there are opportunities for folk to test 'q_,ady Luck" in casinos within an easy days drive of our fair city make big city gambling more accessible. Ever since the state of Georgia introduced the Iot- tew, there have be~n debates over whether it is right or wrong. The only way a matter of right and wrong can be set- tled is to examine the Word of God. But, before we do that, allow me to share a few facts with you. 'q'he Sword of the Lord" reported on November 20, 1992, that some researchers believe that gambling is the fastest grow- ing addiction among teenagers. The director of the Maryland Council on Compulsive Gambling blamed the lottery for the sharp increase of gambling among women and teenagers. Ever since the tottery reached a fever pitch, it has also increased the use of the casino. In 1996, there were 500 casinos in America and casino gambling was allowed in 23 states. According to Newsday, December 3, 1995, in 1994 in Misais~ippi more money was gambled in casi' nos than was spent on all tax- able goods. THE RESULTS of such a fever are not hard to see. The number of Gamblers Anonymous groups has dou- bled and in the state of Connecticut compulsive gamblers were costing the state $200 million more than they took in. Studies have shown that gamblers have committed other crimes to pay for their habit, have lost Jobs because of their habit and many wanted to commit suicide. Admittedly some of these statistics have some age on them, but one can clearly see the detrimental effects that gambling and the tottew of gambling, a sin that placed in the as immorality. David said, "In fact, it (covetousness) because it puts this world in the in one's heart." David Cloud also "The philosophy behind haveonsociety.Evennowand bling and lotteries is again I see on TV a newsman degreescontrar~ from Atlanta telling how licalinjunctions. much tottew players won the ies encourage day before, an obvious They create a lust for attempt not to give news but riches." to create an interest. It would Consider with me be interesting to know how following much lottew players lost the Proverbs day before. It would also be not to be rich: cease interesting to know the truth thine-own-wisdom. about how many Children thou set frth~tiiJ~ went hungry because a par- which is ent spent the paycheck on tot- tainly make tew tickets (an incident that wings: they fly away as I had knowledge of). eagle toward heaven." There are articles of Also Proverbsl3:ll debate on both sides of the "Wealth issue, but can anything be be diminished: but he done to settle the debate. Is gathereth by labour there a standard that will increase." reveal the truth about gam- In my opinion and bling? To some, the not so the clear teaching 0f obvious answer is yes. The ture it is bad answer can be found in the Christians to put Word of God. Granted I can- "Lady Luck." The i not find in the Bible a verse that says thou shalt not gain- is sin. (Romans 14) ble, but God's Word is very It is my clear on the matter of trust- ing God and the attempt to in a God who loves us gain easy wealth, desires the best for t Also, wecan find that cov- etousness is a log for the fire ex~~t. 50 Years Ago.., Inthe Hogansville Herald Predecee~tothe~ tiome t~ BIG BUSINESS - The June 17, 1954 HogansviUe Herald carded a front page story about a new auto dealership ing in town. The story noted, "Friday will be a big day at the handsome new home of the- Plymouth-Chrysler agency this area on North Highway to be known as Motor Sales Company." There just happer,~l to be paid ad irtside the paper, too. *THEME PARTY - Back in 1954, before the days food restaurants and convenience stores, items we take granted were still a cause for celebration. An inside story was headlined, ~/isitors entertained at Coca-Cola to the stow, ~lm. John Spratling and her sister, Bumett of Spartanburg, S.C., party given by Mrs. Hugh Spratling and Mm. Along list of attendees was included, all apparently partake of the carbonated treat. *SHOW TIME- A variety of non-memorable films n at ao rt am, u with Bob Hope and Joan Fontaine; "Jivaro - the Amazon" with Femando Lamas, "Ghost Ship,- Walt Disney's lesser-known epics, BARGAINS OF THE 50S - Getting your car sounds like it was a bargain back then, even a~wing for irdla- tion. Rails M~tor Co. offered an engine tuneup for $3.50, a radiator flush for $1.50 and a grease job for $1.50. WANT AO WONDERS - "Learn to play the Hawaiian and eowtx~ 0u~ar. If k~erest~, send namo and addre~ to..." GOING COSMOPOLITAN - An "/~ the Town" mus- inO ~ lhat Wou c~m actually boy a coOy of tho Allanta doumai or ~ on tho streat the same day the papem are published." This was apparently the first time the Atlant~ Newspapers had begun same-day service of newsrack Iocao Hogans .